Etymology

catamaran (n.)

East Indies log raft, 1670s, from Hindi or Malayalam, from Tamil (Dravidian) kattu-maram "tied wood," from kattu "tie, binding" + maram "wood, tree." It also was used in the West Indies and South America.

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updated on October 19, 2017

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Where Did Catamaran Originate? (A Look Into Its History)

catamaran meaning etymology

Catamarans have been around for centuries, but where did they come from? For those who are curious about the history and origins of catamarans, this article will explore the history of catamaran, from its beginnings to its current uses.

From the meaning of the word “catamaran” to its use in racing and cruising, this article will look into the history of catamarans and how it has shaped the sport today.

We will also look at how catamarans have been used for fishing, and how they are still used for this purpose today.

Finally, we will explore the ways in which catamarans are used for racing and cruising, and the ways in which they have become popular vessels for these activities.

Join us as we explore the fascinating history of catamarans!

Table of Contents

Short Answer

Catamarans are thought to have originated in the South Pacific region, likely in the islands of Polynesia.

The earliest catamarans are believed to have been constructed by the Austronesians around 1500 to 1000 BC.

These vessels were then spread to other cultures by trading and other means of communication.

Today, catamarans are used in various ways around the world, including for commercial and recreational purposes.

The Origins of Catamaran

Catamarans have a long and rich history that dates back to the Indian subcontinent.

The word catamaran is derived from the Tamil language of South India and literally means tied wood, referring to how two logs were tied together to form the original catamaran design.

This sturdy craft was originally used for transportation and fishing, but it eventually made its way to the West in the late 18th century as a recreational sailing vessel.

Today, catamarans are used for a variety of purposes, ranging from racing and cruising to fishing.

They are renowned for their stability, maneuverability, and speed, and they are popular with both recreational and professional sailors alike.

Catamarans are especially adept at handling choppy waters, as their design allows them to handle waves better than most other vessels.

This makes them an ideal choice for sailing in rough or windy conditions.

Catamarans are also praised for their spacious layout, with their two hulls providing more room than other types of vessels.

This makes them ideal for larger groups, as they can comfortably accommodate more people than a traditional sailboat.

Additionally, catamarans are renowned for their efficiency, as their design allows them to move through the water faster and more efficiently than other boats.

Overall, catamarans have come a long way from their humble origins in the Indian subcontinent.

Today, they are a versatile and popular choice for sailing enthusiasts of all levels, and their history is a testament to their durability and longevity.

The Meaning of the Word Catamaran

catamaran meaning etymology

The word catamaran is derived from the Tamil language of South India, where it literally means “tied wood”.

This refers to the traditional design of catamarans, which typically consists of two logs or planks of wood tied together with rope.

The original catamarans were used for transportation and fishing, and their widespread use in the Indian subcontinent has been documented since at least the 3rd century BCE.

Today, the term catamaran is often used to describe a wide range of multi-hulled vessels, from recreational sailing vessels to racing boats and even commercial vessels.

While all of these vessels share the same basic design, the modern catamaran has evolved over the centuries and now includes variations such as trimarans, trimarans, and even pontoon boats.

The development of the modern catamaran began in the late 18th century, when the first catamarans appeared in the West.

These vessels were developed for recreational sailing, and over time they have become increasingly popular for use in racing, cruising, and fishing.

Catamarans are well known for their stability and speed, and they are now used in a variety of applications, from leisure sailing to commercial shipping.

Ultimately, the word catamaran is derived from the Tamil language and it literally means “tied wood”.

Over the centuries, the catamaran has evolved and today it is used for everything from racing to cruising to fishing, and is renowned for its stability and speed.

Catamarans in the West

The first recorded appearance of catamarans in the Western world dates back to the late 18th century.

At the time, the vessels were brought to the Caribbean from the Indian subcontinent by traders and explorers.

They were quickly adopted by sailors for their speed and stability, as well as their ability to navigate shallow waters.

Catamarans were also popular among fishermen, as they could carry more cargo and could easily navigate shallow waters.

The vessels quickly spread across the globe, with catamarans becoming a popular recreational sailing vessel in the 19th century.

The vessels were a common sight in the Caribbean, and they eventually spread to other parts of the world, including the United States and Europe.

By the mid-20th century, catamarans had become a popular recreational sailing vessel, with many people using them for racing, cruising, and fishing.

Today, catamarans are used for a wide variety of activities, from recreational sailing to fishing and racing.

They are renowned for their stability and speed, and they are still popular among recreational sailors of all skill levels.

Catamarans continue to be used for transportation and fishing in the Indian subcontinent, where they originated, and they are still a popular sight in many parts of the world.

Uses of Catamarans

catamaran meaning etymology

Catamarans have long been used for transportation and fishing in the Indian subcontinent, where the word “catamaran” originates from the Tamil language, meaning “tied wood.” This origin refers to the traditional design of tying two logs together to form the original catamaran.

Today, catamarans are used for a variety of purposes, from recreational sailing to racing, cruising, and fishing.

Catamarans are renowned for their stability and speed, making them ideal for traversing large bodies of water quickly.

They provide a stable platform for activities, such as fishing and diving, and offer increased living space when compared to conventional sailboats.

The increased stability of a catamaran also makes them ideal for use in areas with high winds and choppy waters, as they can handle the conditions better than traditional sailboats.

In addition to transportation and fishing, catamarans are also used for a variety of recreational activities.

They are popular among sailors due to their speed and maneuverability, and can be used for racing, cruising, and day-sailing.

Catamarans are also popular among families and large groups, as they provide ample space for socializing and relaxing.

Catamarans have come a long way since their humble beginnings in the Indian subcontinent, and are now an integral part of the sailing world.

With their stability, speed, and ample living space, catamarans are a great choice for both recreational and commercial use.

Racing with Catamarans

Catamarans have become a popular choice for racing enthusiasts all over the world.

This is due to their remarkable stability and speed, which make them ideal for competitive sailing.

Catamarans are able to cut through the water more efficiently than traditional sailing vessels, and their light weight makes them easier to maneuver.

In addition, their dual-hulls provide more surface area, allowing them to catch more wind and push through the water faster.

This makes them perfect for racing, as they can easily navigate tight turns and sail upwind faster than any other type of boat.

Catamarans are also well-suited for long-distance sailing, as they typically have more space than traditional vessels.

This extra space allows for more storage and greater comfort, making it easier for a crew to stay out on the water for longer periods of time.

Catamarans also have a relatively flat bottom, which reduces drag and helps make them faster than traditional boats.

Today, catamarans are used in a variety of sailing competitions, including the Americas Cup and the Volvo Ocean Race.

These races typically involve multiple catamarans, making them exciting spectacles to watch.

Catamarans have also become popular in recreational sailing, and many people use them for pleasure cruises and fishing trips.

No matter how it’s used, the catamaran has become an icon in the sailing world.

Its unique advantages have made it a favorite of both racers and recreational sailors alike, and its history makes it an interesting topic to explore.

Cruising with Catamarans

catamaran meaning etymology

Catamarans are well-known for their stability and speed, making them a popular choice for recreational sailing.

Whether youre looking for a day of leisurely sailing or a thrilling race, catamarans offer an enjoyable experience that can be tailored to your individual needs.

Catamarans are especially suited to cruising, as they offer plenty of space for passengers and cargo, and their hulls dont require much maintenance.

Catamarans have a unique design that allows them to cruise efficiently and smoothly.

Their two hulls make them more stable than other boats, and their flat decks provide plenty of room for passengers to move around.

The spacious cabins provide plenty of space for sleeping, dining, and relaxing, and the cockpit is designed to make sailing easy and enjoyable.

Catamarans are also known for their speed and agility.

Their hulls are designed to cut through the water with minimal resistance, allowing them to reach speeds of up to 20 knots.

Their shallow draft also makes them ideal for shallow waters, allowing you to explore more areas than with a traditional monohull boat.

In addition to their speed and stability, catamarans are also known for their safety.

Their wide beam makes them less likely to capsize, and their two hulls help to spread the load, making them less susceptible to sinking than other vessels.

Catamarans also have a lower center of gravity, making them less likely to tip over in rough seas.

Whether youre looking for a leisurely day of sailing or a thrilling race, catamarans are an excellent choice for cruising.

With their stability, speed, and safety, they offer an enjoyable and accessible way to explore the open waters.

Fishing with Catamarans

The use of catamarans for fishing is nothing new, with the vessels first being used for the purpose in the Indian subcontinent thousands of years ago.

In the Tamil language of South India, the word catamaran comes from two words that literally mean tied wood, referring to how two logs were tied together to form the original catamaran design.

It was these vessels that were used for fishing, with two logs forming the base for the frame and a platform built on top for the fishermen to stand on.

These catamarans were incredibly versatile vessels, allowing fishermen to access shallow waters and maneuver quickly and easily to chase schools of fish.

They were also incredibly stable, and could carry a large amount of equipment and supplies, which made them ideal for long-distance fishing trips.

Today, modern catamarans are still used for fishing, with the vessels’ stable and maneuverable design still providing an ideal platform for fishermen.

Modern catamarans are made from a variety of materials, including fiberglass and aluminum, and are available in a range of sizes to suit different needs.

Catamarans are also popular for recreational fishing, with the vessels providing a great platform for anglers to enjoy their sport.

The popularity of catamarans for fishing is a testament to the versatility and effectiveness of these vessels.

With their stable and maneuverable design, their ability to access shallow waters, and their capacity to carry a large amount of equipment and supplies, they remain a popular choice for those looking to take to the water in pursuit of their catch.

Final Thoughts

Catamarans have come a long way since their humble beginnings in the Indian subcontinent.

From their simple design of two logs tied together, to today’s modern catamarans used for racing, cruising, and fishing, it’s amazing to think about all the ways these vessels have evolved.

Now that you know the history behind the word catamaran, why not take a sail and experience the thrill of these incredible vessels for yourself?

James Frami

At the age of 15, he and four other friends from his neighborhood constructed their first boat. He has been sailing for almost 30 years and has a wealth of knowledge that he wants to share with others.

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Definition of catamaran

Illustration of catamaran, examples of catamaran in a sentence.

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'catamaran.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Tamil kaṭṭumaram , from kaṭṭu to tie + maram tree, wood

1673, in the meaning defined above

Dictionary Entries Near catamaran

Cite this entry.

“Catamaran.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary , Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/catamaran. Accessed 19 Jun. 2024.

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  • 1.1 Etymology
  • 1.2 Pronunciation
  • 1.3.1 Synonyms
  • 1.3.2 Hypernyms
  • 1.3.3 Hyponyms
  • 1.3.4 Coordinate terms
  • 1.3.5 Derived terms
  • 1.3.6 Related terms
  • 1.3.7 Descendants
  • 1.3.8 Translations
  • 2.1 Etymology
  • 2.2 Pronunciation
  • 2.4 Further reading
  • 3.1 Etymology
  • 4.1 Etymology
  • 4.2.1 Declension

catamaran meaning etymology

From Tamil கட்டுமரம் ( kaṭṭumaram ) , from கட்டு ( kaṭṭu , “ to tie ” ) +‎ மரம் ( maram , “ tree, wood ” ) .

Pronunciation

  • ( UK ) IPA ( key ) : /ˌkæ.tə.məˈɹæn/ , /ˈkæ.tə.məˌɹæn/
  • ( Canada , US ) IPA ( key ) : /ˈkæ.tə.məˌɹæn/ , /ˌkæ.tə.məˈɹæn/
CA synth: ( )

catamaran ( plural catamarans )

  • 1838 , [Letitia Elizabeth] Landon (indicated as editor), chapter XV, in Duty and Inclination:   [ … ] , volume II, London: Henry Colburn ,   [ … ] , →OCLC , page 218 : Swift over the seas the vessel drives; Madras appears in sight. The first object catching the eye, upon the anchor being cast, was an Indian upon his catamaran , who, making a sudden motion, sprung to the side of the ship, grappled there for a moment, and the next was on the deck.
  • 1889 , William Makepeace Thackeray, Hobson's Choice : She meddles with my prescriptions for your wife; she doctors the infant in private: you'll never have a quiet house or a quiet wife as long as that old Catamaran is here.
  • 1808–10 , William Hickey , Memoirs of a Georgian Rake , Folio Society 1995, p. 90: Three or four strange-looking things now came close to our boat, which I understood were called ‘ catamarans ’, consisting of nothing more than two or three large trees, the trunk part only strongly lashed together, upon which sat two men nearly in a state of nature [ … ] .
  • ( obsolete ) An old kind of fireship .
  • ( twin-hulled ship or boat ) : twinhull , cat
  • ( twin-hulled ship or boat ) : multihull
  • ( twin-hulled ship or boat ) : AC45 , AC72

Coordinate terms

  • outrigger canoe

Derived terms

  • cat ( diminutive )

Related terms

Descendants.

  • → Portuguese: catamarã

Translations

  (shuāngtǐchuán)                     (katamarán),   (dígastro)     (katamaran)     (sōdōsen), (katamaran)   (ttenmok)             ,           (katamarán)       (kaṭṭumaram) (reua bai têe mee lam reua sŏng lam)       (katamarán)

From Tamil கட்டு ( kaṭṭu , “ to tie ” ) +‎ மரம் ( maram , “ tree, wood ” ) .

  • IPA ( key ) : /ka.ta.ma.ʁɑ̃/
Audio: ( )
Audio ( ): ( )
  • Homophone : catamarans

catamaran   m ( plural catamarans )

  • catamaran , a twinhulled ship or boat

Further reading

  • “ catamaran ”, in Trésor de la langue française informatisé [ Digitized Treasury of the French Language ] , 2012 .

Borrowed from English catamaran , from Tamil .

  • ( Jersey ) catamaran

Borrowed from French catamaran .

catamaran   n ( plural catamarane )

singular plural
indefinite articulation definite articulation indefinite articulation definite articulation
nominative/accusative (un) (niște)
genitive/dative (unui) (unor)
vocative

catamaran meaning etymology

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[ kat- uh -m uh - ran , kat - uh -m uh -ran ]

  • a vessel, usually propelled by sail, formed of two hulls or floats held side by side by a frame above them. Compare trimaran .
  • a float or sailing raft formed of a number of logs lashed together, used in certain parts of India, South America, etc.
  • Canadian Dialect. a wooden sled.

/ ˌkætəməˈræn /

  • a sailing, or sometimes motored, vessel with twin hulls held parallel by a rigid framework
  • a primitive raft made of logs lashed together
  • old-fashioned. a quarrelsome woman

Discover More

Word history and origins.

Origin of catamaran 1

Example Sentences

It involved a private island tour, catamaran cruise, visiting Rihanna’s childhood home and more.

We were about to sail back to Puerto Vallarta, but the catamaran barely moved.

I think the crew just didn’t know how to maneuver the catamaran very well, the sea was not very rough nor was it too windy.

I can paddle my catamaran against both wind and tide; why cannot you do the same?

They never tired, I think, of seeing me handle my giant “catamaran” and the (to them) mysterious harpoon.

We also started building a catamaran, with which to navigate the river when the floods had subsided.

She had easily forced a way for the catamaran through the branches, and once past, had drawn them together again.

Yamba cried out to me to lie flat on the catamaran, and hold on as tightly as I could until we reached smooth water again.

Related Words

Maritime Page

What Are Catamarans And Their History?

Catamarans are boats with two connected hulls that are joined by a bridge. Because they are faster, more stable, and capable of carrying larger cargo than their monohull counterparts, catamarans are growing in popularity.

As a result, designers and owners have greater freedom to accommodate space needs in terms of size and usefulness than they would with single-hulled vessels.

The name catamaran came from the Tamil word “kattumaram” which basically meant “logs which were bound together”. These traditional watercraft were basically used on the south coast of India and Srilanka. They were dated back to as early as the 5th century when they were used to transport troops from one island to another.

Let us get into more details to learn more about the different types of catamarans and their functions.

Sailing catamaran in harbor

What are the different types of catamarans?

Catamarans are mainly divided into two categories: sailing and power catamarans, however, both categories can be split into smaller groups by their size and use.

Sailing catamarans

These types of catamarans are mainly propelled with help of sails. The sails act as wings with which the vessel moves forward with the help of wind energy. The sailing catamarans have advanced significantly in recent years in terms of both design and performance attributes. Sailing catamarans are further subdivided based on their dimensions and functions and are classified into,

Small, mini, or sports catamarans

Depending on the size, these are also known as leisure catamarans and can carry a load of 6 persons on average. You’ve definitely seen some of them speeding through your local beach waters on hot, sunny weekends; some of them are made to be driven by one person. Those designed for use in sports have a trapeze that enables one to hike out and serve as a counterweight.

Small-day sailing cats are well-liked because they offer a secure and straightforward learning environment, and you can see fleets of them in resorts where guests with little to no sailing experience utilize them. These little cats are often made of roto-molded plastic or fiberglass, and as they frequently lack auxiliary motors, sails are their only means of propulsion

A trampoline that spans the two hulls of the sports catamarans acts as a bridge so that individuals can move from one to the other without falling into the water. They may be launched and landed from a beach as opposed to a dock because of their modest size. They have a rotating mast and a mainsail with full-length battens.

Cruising Catamarans

In the worlds of long-distance cruising and bareboat chartering, larger cruising cats have dominated. These are more stable than their monohull competitors, allowing them to securely transport people across continents. These are more stable than their monohull competitors, allowing them to securely transport people across continents.

For maneuverability, charter cats frequently have two engines—one in each hull—as well as a mast that holds a mainsail and at least one headsail.

Nowadays, cruising catamarans are more widely available than monohulls at bareboat charter firms with tropical bases, and those numbers are rising in places like the Mediterranean.

Power catamarans

Power catamarans, often known as “multi-hull powerboats” or “power cats,” are vessels without masts or sails but with larger and more powerful engines. They can be the most perfect choice for your first boat if you enjoy offshore fishing or other water sports. You get a great balance of performance, stability, and maneuverability with these powerboats. Power cats come in a range of different sizes and shapes. In terms of dimensions and functions, they are also divided into,

Center console fishing catamarans

The fishing industry is flooded with smaller power cat brands, while bareboat charter and cruise platforms are seeing the emergence of larger ones. The multi-hull performance boat frequently has a center console driver layout.  They can reach higher top speeds thanks to their higher horsepower, but these cats also need to be strengthened hulls to support the weight and power of these engines.

When used for fishing, normally lesser than 50 ft, there are several options available for live wells, rod holders, gear storage, and built-in coolers for both fish and beverages. Depending on the length and design elements of the boat, certain consoles may locate closer to the bow or aft of the vessel.

Offshore powerboat racing catamarans

Offshore powerboat racing is the aquatic equivalent of off-road auto racing. Since its inception in the late 1960s, offshore racing has changed drastically.

Though V-bottom powerboat classes still exist, twin-engine catamarans with top speeds of 170 MPH in the most powerful classes dominate the sport.

The offshore race course may be the most dynamic setting in all of the motorsports because of the constant fluctuations in a swell, wind, tide, current, and other factors. The track might abruptly change from being friendly to antagonistic.

These boats are designed and built such that they are both lightweight but extremely strong using the most advanced materials like carbon fiber and Kevlar . Manufacturing methods such as infusion are adopted to make sure the properties of the materials are not lost during the production stages.

Motor yachts and ferries

For their roominess and speed, catamaran designs have also become popular among motor yachts and commercial passenger ferries. These cruise-centric yachts offer homelike livability for avid travelers, are fuel efficient, and are fairly intuitive to run.

Motor yacht catamarans have been designed with larger living spaces in mind, as well as more outdoor recreation places. The huge fly bridges provide additional space for relaxing and socializing, and electric boat davits make lifting the dinghy simple. Daily tasks like cooking can be done with ease because catamarans don’t heel.

Why Is There A Shift In Trend From Monohulls To Catamarans?

Recently, more and more often you can find catamarans in the harbors of large cities and small resorts. It can be unequivocally argued that catamarans are gaining popularity among both beginners and experienced sailors and even celebrities. But what makes them gain this popularity?

Catamarans In Terms Of Function And Utility

The enormous interior space expansion can provide the owners considerably more freedom to select furnishings without regard to size limits and more room for additional appliances like washers and dryers, which can make life on board much easier.

Due to their broader decks and roomier interiors, catamarans are frequently employed as party boats. The deck can accommodate more people without giving them the impression of being crammed into a small space.

In terms of storage, catamarans offer more alternatives than monohulls because both hulls can serve a variety of purposes, increasing the vessel’s overall capacity as well.

Catamarans are typically utilized as party boats since they have bigger deck spaces and greater room for movement. The deck can also accommodate more people without giving them the impression of being confined in a small space.

If any equipment breaks down, there is always a backup. For instance, if one of the engines on the port hull fails, we can always use the starboard engine to re-enter landfall. Likewise, if a generator breaks down, there is always a second generator that can be utilized as a backup.

Catamarans In Terms Of Performance And Stability

Due to the narrow hulls of catamarans, which serve to reduce drag forces, they frequently outperform monohulls. On performance power catamarans, the area in between the two hulls known as the “Tunnel” is built in a similar way to an aerofoil so that it behaves like a wing, boosting the aerodynamic lift forces and enhancing the overall effectiveness and top-end speeds of the craft.

Due to their stronger lift forces and lower water friction than monohulls, catamarans typically have a better fuel economy. This is because the strain placed on the engines as a whole is reduced, resulting in less fuel being used.

In terms of roll stability, catamarans are often more stable than monohulls. This offers them an advantage in terms of comfort and the ability to carry out various activities onboard the vessel with ease, as well as lowering the possibility of passengers falling on board. Because they are less likely to make passengers seasick, catamarans are typically used as ferries or passenger ships.

Catamarans provide a more comfortable ride whether they are in shallow water, deep water, or at anchor; they have a decreased chance of keeling over or capsizing in heavy winds.

Also, catamarans have a much lower draft when compared to their mono hull counterpart’s allowing them to easily ply over shallower waters.

What Are The Potential Drawbacks Of Catamarans?

Catamarans have a few minor limitations, much like any other kind of boat:

Finding dock space is frequently challenging and expensive for catamarans because they take up more room.

Power and sailing cats can both smash into the bridge deck when heading to the weather because of the way that they are built.

Additionally, because they have two hulls instead of one, sailing cats can’t necessarily aim as high into the wind as monohulls can.

Overall, a catamaran allows for greater speeds, but at the expense of much-reduced vessel control. Knowing when to accelerate and when to slow down is difficult when sailing a catamaran. A catamaran can be readily overturned in sea conditions that a monohull can maneuver securely in.

Finally, while it may be alluring to add more weight in a catamaran due to the space it provides, doing so will almost certainly degrade the performance of either power or sailing cat—something that is less of an issue on their monohull counterparts.

Catamarans are a growing trend due to their better advantages over their monohull counterparts. Despite having an ancient fundamental design, catamarans are a modern boating alternative that can be used by any boater for both commercial and leisure uses.

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Definition of catamaran noun from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

catamaran meaning etymology

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Meaning of catamaran in English

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  • cabin cruiser
  • dragon boat
  • rubber dinghy
  • As soon as the boat anchored, a catamaran put out, and brought Charlie and his followers to shore.  
  • Next morning we were visited by a party of natives from the neighbouring island, consisting of six men in a canoe, and one on a catamaran or raft.  
  • Soon we were surrounded with catamarans and canoes, with three or four natives in each.  
  • The horses and cows were taken on a species of catamaran, or large raft, that is much used in those mild seas, and which sail reasonably well a little off the wind, and not very badly on.  
  • When we reached the lagoon, a catamaran with three natives on it came off to us.  

Examples of catamaran

Translations of catamaran.

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(especially of earth or crops) dried out because of too much heat and not enough rain

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catamaran meaning etymology

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Definition of 'catamaran'

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catamaran meaning etymology

Meaning of "catamaran" in the English dictionary

Etymology of the word catamaran, pronunciation of catamaran, grammatical category of catamaran, what does catamaran mean in english.

catamaran

Definition of catamaran in the English dictionary

The first definition of catamaran in the dictionary is a sailing, or sometimes motored, vessel with twin hulls held parallel by a rigid framework. Other definition of catamaran is a primitive raft made of logs lashed together. Catamaran is also a quarrelsome woman.

WORDS THAT RHYME WITH CATAMARAN

Words that begin like catamaran, words that end like catamaran, synonyms and antonyms of catamaran in the english dictionary of synonyms, words relating to «catamaran», translation of «catamaran» into 25 languages.

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catamaran verb

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What does the verb catamaran mean?

There is one meaning in OED's entry for the verb catamaran . See ‘Meaning & use’ for definition, usage, and quotation evidence.

Entry status

OED is undergoing a continuous programme of revision to modernize and improve definitions. This entry has not yet been fully revised.

How common is the verb catamaran ?

How is the verb catamaran pronounced?

British english, u.s. english, where does the verb catamaran come from.

Earliest known use

The earliest known use of the verb catamaran is in the 1820s.

OED's only evidence for catamaran is from 1820, in the writing of Henry Matthews, judge and traveller.

It is also recorded as a noun from the late 1600s.

catamaran is formed within English, by conversion.

Etymons: catamaran n.

Nearby entries

  • catalysor, n. 1901–
  • catalysotype, n. 1853–
  • catalyst, n. 1902–
  • catalytic, adj. & n. 1836–
  • catalytical, adj. 1889–
  • catalytically, adv. 1845–
  • catalytic converter, n. 1955–
  • catalytic cracker, n. 1951–
  • catalytic cracking, n. 1927–
  • catamaran, n. 1697–
  • catamaran, v. 1820–
  • catamenia, n. 1764–
  • catamenial, adj. 1851–
  • catamidiate, v. 1656
  • catamite, n. ?1552–
  • catamited, adj. 1697
  • catamiting, adj. a1641–
  • catamount, n. 1664–
  • catamountain | cat o' mountain, n. ?a1475–
  • catanadromous, adj. 1753
  • catananche, n. 1798–

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Meaning & use

Pronunciation, entry history for catamaran, v..

catamaran, v. was first published in 1889; not yet revised.

catamaran, v. was last modified in July 2023.

Revision of the OED is a long-term project. Entries in oed.com which have not been revised may include:

  • corrections and revisions to definitions, pronunciation, etymology, headwords, variant spellings, quotations, and dates;
  • new senses, phrases, and quotations which have been added in subsequent print and online updates.

Revisions and additions of this kind were last incorporated into catamaran, v. in July 2023.

Earlier versions of this entry were published in:

OED First Edition (1889)

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OED Second Edition (1989)

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Citation details

Factsheet for catamaran, v., browse entry.

Queensland Maroons State of Origin team list for Game II announced, Reece Walsh picked, Selwyn Cobbo misses out

Sport Queensland Maroons State of Origin team list for Game II announced, Reece Walsh picked, Selwyn Cobbo misses out

Selwyn Cobbo of the Maroons fends off Nicho Hynes of the Blues during State of Origin

Maroons coach Billy Slater has backed Reece Walsh to be his number 1 for Game II, while leaving Brisbane speedster Selwyn Cobbo out of the squad.

Walsh has not played since he was concussed in the seventh minute of Queensland's 38-10 win in Game I, but has received a full endorsement from Slater that he is the man to play fullback for the Maroons.

The 21-year-old has undergone all required protocols while back with club side Brisbane after his mandatory 11-day standdown, in which he missed NRL clashes with Cronulla and South Sydney.

As long as he passes final tests in camp, Walsh will take the field against NSW at the MCG on June 26.

"I have been talking to Reece over the last week and he has been ticking all the boxes and being really professional away from playing," Maroons coach Billy Slater told the Nine Network on Sunday.

Queensland State of Origin player Reece Walsh pumps his fist to a crowd in celebration during a football match

Dolphins forward Felise Kaufusi, 18th man in Game I, comes onto the bench while Warriors back-rower Kurt Capewell, who can also play centre, earns a Maroons recall on the bench.

Parramatta lock J'maine Hopgood, who made his Origin debut in Sydney, missed selection with a back injury after he was unavailable for the NRL match against Sydney Roosters on Saturday.

Brisbane outside back Selwyn Cobbo, who starred in Sydney, has been left out of the squad.

The 22-year-old played for the Broncos in the 22-12 loss to South Sydney on Friday night.

"Selwyn's just not quite 100 per cent at the moment. He's been playing with injections … we just thought it was best for Selwyn to have a rest," Slater said on Monday.

Capewell will fill the utility role which Cobbo had for Game I.

Slater was full of praise for the Warriors forward, who last played for the Maroons in 2022.

"He's got great versatility in his game, he's never let Queensland down," Slater said.

"He was playing extremely well before he hurt his calf a month ago."

Veteran Dane Gagai has been brought in as the 18th man.

The extended squad also includes young forwards Heilum Luki and Trent Loiero, who will join camp for the first time when the squad assembles in Brisbane today.

Full Maroons Origin II team list

Reece Walsh – Brisbane Broncos

Xavier Coates – Melbourne Storm

Valentine Holmes – North Qld Cowboys

Hamiso Tabuai-Fidow – The Dolphins

Murray Taulagi – North Qld Cowboys

Tom Dearden – North Qld Cowboys

Daly Cherry-Evans (c) – Manly Sea Eagles

Reuben Cotter – North Qld Cowboys

Ben Hunt – St George Illawarra Dragons

Lindsay Collins – Sydney Roosters

Jaydn Su'A – St George Illawarra Dragons

Jeremiah Nanai – North Qld Cowboys

Patrick Carrigan – Brisbane Broncos

Harry Grant – Melbourne Storm

Moeaki Fotuaika – Gold Coast Titans

Felise Kaufusi – The Dolphins

Kurt Capewell – New Zealand Warriors

Dane Gagai – Newcastle Knights

Heilum Luki – North Qld Cowboys

Trent Loiero – Melbourne Storm

The ABC of SPORT

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Latrell mitchell is back for nsw as coach maguire make several changes for game ii.

Latrell Mitchell of the Blues celebrates scoring a try

'Big call in a big game like this': Blues question debutant's dismissal early in Origin thumping

Joseph-Aukuso Sua'ali'i is sent off

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Playing with the big boys —

Blue origin joins spacex and ula in new round of military launch contracts, "lane 1 serves our commercial-like missions that can accept more risk.".

Stephen Clark - Jun 14, 2024 11:19 pm UTC

Blue Origin's New Glenn rocket on the launch pad for testing earlier this year.

After years of lobbying, protests, and bidding, Jeff Bezos's space company is now a military launch contractor.

The US Space Force announced Thursday that Blue Origin will compete with United Launch Alliance and SpaceX for at least 30 military launch contracts over the next five years. These launch contracts have a combined value of up to $5.6 billion.

This is the first of two major contract decisions the Space Force will make this year as the military seeks to foster more competition among its roster of launch providers and reduce its reliance on just one or two companies.

For more than a decade following its formation from the merger of Boeing and Lockheed Martin rocket programs, ULA was the sole company certified to launch the military's most critical satellites. This changed in 2018, when SpaceX started launching national security satellites for the military. In 2020, despite protests from Blue Origin seeking eligibility, the Pentagon selected ULA and SpaceX to continue sharing launch duties .

The National Security Space Launch (NSSL) program is in charge of selecting contractors to deliver military surveillance, navigation, and communications satellites into orbit.

Over the next five years, the Space Force wants to tap into new launch capabilities from emerging space companies. The procurement approach for this new round of contracts, known as NSSL Phase 3, is different from the way the military previously bought launch services. Instead of grouping all national security launches into one monolithic contract, the Space Force is dividing them into two classifications: Lane 1 and Lane 2.

The Space Force's contract announced Thursday was for Lane 1, which is for less demanding missions to low-Earth orbit. These missions include smaller tech demos, experiments, and launches for the military’s new constellation of missile-tracking and data-relay satellites, an effort that will eventually include hundreds or thousands of spacecraft managed by the Pentagon’s Space Development Agency.

This fall, the Space Force will award up to three contracts for Lane 2, which covers the government's most sensitive national security satellites, which require "complex security and integration requirements." These are often large, heavy spacecraft weighing many tons and sometimes needing to go to orbits thousands of miles from Earth. The Space Force will require Lane 2 contractors to go through a more extensive certification process than is required in Lane 1.

“Today marks the beginning of this innovative, dual-lane approach to launch service acquisition, whereby Lane 1 serves our commercial-like missions that can accept more risk and Lane 2 provides our traditional, full mission assurance for the most stressing heavy-lift launches of our most risk-averse missions," said Frank Calvelli, assistant secretary of the Air Force for space acquisition and integration.

Meeting the criteria

The Space Force received seven bids for Lane 1, but only three companies met the criteria to join the military's roster of launch providers. The basic requirement to win a Lane 1 contract was for a company to show its rocket can place at least 15,000 pounds of payload mass into low-Earth orbit, either on a single flight or over a series of flights within a 90-day period.

The bidders also had to substantiate their plan to launch the rocket they proposed to use for Lane 1 missions by December 15 of this year. A spokesperson for Space Systems Command said SpaceX proposed using their Falcon 9 and Falcon Heavy rockets, and ULA offered its Vulcan rocket. Those launchers are already flying. Blue Origin proposed its heavy-lift New Glenn rocket, slated for an inaugural test flight no earlier than September .

“As we anticipated, the pool of awardees is small this year because many companies are still maturing their launch capabilities,” said Brig. Gen. Kristin Panzenhagen, program executive officer for the Space Force's assured access to space division. “Our strategy accounted for this by allowing on-ramp opportunities every year, and we expect increasing competition and diversity as new providers and systems complete development."

A SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket lifts off from NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

The Space Force plans to open up the first on-ramp opportunity for Lane 1 as soon as the end of this year. Companies with medium-lift rockets in earlier stages of development, such as Rocket Lab, Relativity Space, Firefly Aerospace, and Stoke Space, will have the chance to join ULA, SpaceX, and Blue Origin in the Lane 1 pool at that time. The structure of the NSSL Phase 3 contracts allow the Pentagon to take advantage of emerging launch capabilities as soon as they become available, according to Calvelli.

In a statement, Panzenhagen said having additional launch providers will increase the Space Force's "resiliency" in a time of increasing competition between the US, Russia, and China in orbit. "Launching more risk-tolerant satellites on potentially less mature launch systems using tailored independent government mission assurance could yield substantial operational responsiveness, innovation, and savings,” Panzenhagen said.

More competition, theoretically, will also deliver lower launch prices to the Space Force. SpaceX and Blue Origin rockets are partially reusable, while ULA eventually plans to recover and reuse Vulcan main engines.

Over the next five years, Space Systems Command will dole out fixed-price "task orders" to ULA, SpaceX, and Blue Origin for groups of Lane 1 missions. The first batch of missions up for awards in Lane 1 include seven launches for the Space Development Agency's missile tracking mega-constellation, plus a task order for the National Reconnaissance Office, the government's spy satellite agency. However, military officials require a rocket to have completed at least one successful orbital launch to win a Lane 1 task order, and Blue Origin's New Glenn doesn't yet satisfy this requirement.

The Space Force will pay Blue Origin $5 million for an "initial capabilities assessment" for Lane 1. SpaceX and ULA, the military's incumbent launch contractors, will each receive $1.5 million for similar assessments.

ULA, SpaceX, and Blue Origin are also the top contenders to win Lane 2 contracts later this year . In order to compete in Lane 2, a launch provider must show it has a plan for its rockets to meet the Space Force's stringent certification requirements by October 1, 2026. SpaceX's Falcon 9 and Falcon Heavy are already certified, and ULA's Vulcan is on a path to achieve this milestone by the end of this year, pending a successful second test flight in the next few months. A successful debut of New Glenn by the end of this year would put the October 2026 deadline within reach of Blue Origin.

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IMAGES

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    catamaran meaning etymology

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    catamaran meaning etymology

  6. What is the meaning of the word CATAMARAN?

    catamaran meaning etymology

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COMMENTS

  1. catamaran

    catamaran (n.)East Indies log raft, 1670s, from Hindi or Malayalam, from Tamil (Dravidian) ... "damage, loss, failure; disaster, misfortune, adversity," a word of obscure origin. Early etymologists associat. master. late Old English mægester "a man having control or authority over a place; a teacher or tutor of children," from Latin magister ...

  2. Catamaran

    A catamaran (/ ˌ k æ t ə m ə ˈ r æ n / ... Etymology. The word "catamaran" is derived from the Tamil word, kattumaram (கட்டுமரம்), which means "logs bound together" and is a type of single-hulled raft made of three to seven tree trunks lashed together. The term has evolved in English usage to refer to unrelated twin ...

  3. Where Did Catamaran Originate? (A Look Into Its History)

    This origin refers to the traditional design of tying two logs together to form the original catamaran. Today, catamarans are used for a variety of purposes, from recreational sailing to racing, cruising, and fishing. Catamarans are renowned for their stability and speed, making them ideal for traversing large bodies of water quickly.

  4. Catamaran Definition & Meaning

    catamaran: [noun] a vessel (such as a sailboat) with twin hulls and usually a deck or superstructure connecting the hulls.

  5. Catamaran

    catamaran, twin-hulled sailing and powered boat developed for sport and recreation in the second half of the 20th century. Its design is based on a raft of two logs bridged by planks that had earlier been used by peoples in the Indonesian archipelago and throughout Polynesia and Micronesia. Early catamarans were up to 21.3 metres (70 feet) long, originally paddled by many men, and used for ...

  6. catamaran

    catamaran (plural catamarans) A twin - hulled ship or boat . Swift over the seas the vessel drives; Madras appears in sight. The first object catching the eye, upon the anchor being cast, was an Indian upon his catamaran, who, making a sudden motion, sprung to the side of the ship, grappled there for a moment, and the next was on the deck ...

  7. Catamaran

    A catamaran (from Tamil kattumaram) is a type of multihulled boat or ship consisting of two hulls, or Vakas, joined by a frame, formed of Akas. Catamarans can be sail- or engine-powered. ... ↑ Catamaran Online Etymology Dictionary. Retrieved June 17, 2008. ↑ 2.0 2.1 2.2 L. Francis Herreshoff, The Spirit of the Times, ...

  8. catamaran, n. meanings, etymology and more

    corrections and revisions to definitions, pronunciation, etymology, headwords, variant spellings, quotations, and dates; new senses, phrases, and quotations which have been added in subsequent print and online updates. Revisions and additions of this kind were last incorporated into catamaran, n. in July 2023.

  9. CATAMARAN Definition & Meaning

    Catamaran definition: a vessel, usually propelled by sail, formed of two hulls or floats held side by side by a frame above them.. See examples of CATAMARAN used in a sentence.

  10. What Are Catamarans And Their History?

    Sailing catamarans. These types of catamarans are mainly propelled with help of sails. The sails act as wings with which the vessel moves forward with the help of wind energy. The sailing catamarans have advanced significantly in recent years in terms of both design and performance attributes.

  11. catamaran

    • Thirty yards separated them from the catamaran. • Lightning played across the front almost continually, and thunder rolled over the catamaran. • The catamaran surged forward under the added power of the big sail. Origin catamaran (1600-1700) Tamil kattumaram, from kattu " to tie " + maram " tree "

  12. CATAMARAN

    CATAMARAN definition: 1. a sailing boat that has two parallel hulls (= floating parts) held together by a single deck…. Learn more.

  13. Catamaran

    catamaran: 1 n a sailboat with two parallel hulls held together by single deck Type of: sailboat , sailing boat a small sailing vessel; usually with a single mast

  14. r/etymology on Reddit: The word "Catamaran" (a vessel, usually

    The word "Catamaran" (a vessel, usually propelled by sail, formed of two hulls or floats held side by side by a frame above them), comes from the Tamil words "Kattu Maram", which means tied logs or tied trees.

  15. catamaran noun

    Definition of catamaran noun in Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary. Meaning, pronunciation, picture, example sentences, grammar, usage notes, synonyms and more.

  16. CATAMARAN

    CATAMARAN meaning: 1. a sailing boat that has two parallel hulls (= floating parts) held together by a single deck…. Learn more.

  17. Catamaran Definition & Meaning

    Catamaran definition: A boat with two parallel hulls or floats, especially a light sailboat with a mast mounted on a transverse frame joining the hulls.

  18. etymology

    Often it takes a lot of work. You can start with Online Etymology, good for basics. However, it won't list the second meaning of catamaran, as is also the case for many dictionaries, because it was a colloquilalism used around the turn of the last century. Dictionary.com defines it: 3. (old-fashioned) a quarrelsome woman, as does Collins, but ...

  19. CATAMARAN definition and meaning

    3 meanings: 1. a sailing, or sometimes motored, vessel with twin hulls held parallel by a rigid framework 2. a primitive raft.... Click for more definitions.

  20. Catamaran Definition & Meaning

    1 ENTRIES FOUND: catamaran (noun) catamaran /ˌkætəmə ˈ ræn/ noun. plural catamarans. Britannica Dictionary definition of CATAMARAN. [count] : a boat with two hulls — see picture at boat. CATAMARAN meaning: a boat with two hulls.

  21. Meaning of "catamaran" in the English dictionary

    Definition of catamaran in the English dictionary. The first definition of catamaran in the dictionary is a sailing, or sometimes motored, vessel with twin hulls held parallel by a rigid framework. Other definition of catamaran is a primitive raft made of logs lashed together.Catamaran is also a quarrelsome woman.

  22. catamaran, v. meanings, etymology and more

    corrections and revisions to definitions, pronunciation, etymology, headwords, variant spellings, quotations, and dates; new senses, phrases, and quotations which have been added in subsequent print and online updates. Revisions and additions of this kind were last incorporated into catamaran, v. in September 2023.

  23. Kattumaram

    Etymology. The English word "catamaran" is derived from the Tamil word, kattumaram (கட்டுமரம்), which means "logs bound together". However, the original kattumaram did not refer to double-hulled boats at all, but to a type of single-hulled raft of the Tamil people made of three to seven tree trunks lashed together. The term ...

  24. Apple stops offering buy now, pay later loans in U.S

    Apple said it would no longer issue loans that enabled customers to buy products online and pay in four interest-free installments, at prices up to $1,000.

  25. Queensland Maroons State of Origin team list for Game II announced

    Full Maroons Origin II team list. Reece Walsh - Brisbane Broncos. Xavier Coates - Melbourne Storm. Valentine Holmes - North Qld Cowboys. Hamiso Tabuai-Fidow - The Dolphins.

  26. Blue Origin joins SpaceX and ULA in new round of military launch

    The Space Force will pay Blue Origin $5 million for an "initial capabilities assessment" for Lane 1. SpaceX and ULA, the military's incumbent launch contractors, will each receive $1.5 million for ...