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The Hunter 33 Sailboat Specs & Key Performance Indicators

The Hunter 33 is a popular American sailboat that was designed by John Cherubini and first built in 1977 by Hunter Marine. It has a masthead sloop rig, a fixed fin keel, an inboard motor, and is known for its spacious interior, easy handling and good performance.

The boat has undergone several revisions and updates over the years, and has been compared to other sailboats in its class such as the Catalina 34, the Beneteau Oceanis 331, and the Tartan 3400.

A hunter 33e sailboat in a dock

Published Specification for the Hunter 33

Underwater Profile:  Fin with bulb keel and Spade Rudder

Hull Material : GRP (Fibreglass)

Length Overall : 33'6" (10.21m)

Waterline Length : 29'5" (8.97m)

Beam : 11'8" (3.51m)

Draft : 5'6" (1.7m) * 

Rig Type :  B&R

Displacement : 12,400lb (5,625kg)

Designer :  Hunter Marine

Builder :  Hunter Marine (USA)

Year First Built : 2012

* Shoal Draft version:  4'6" (1.4m)

Published Design Ratios for the Hunter 33

1. Sail Area/Displacement Ratio:  18.7

  • Less than 16 would be considered under-powered;
  • 16 to 20 would indicate reasonably good performance;
  • Over 20 suggests relatively high performance.

2. Ballast/Displacement Ratio:  27.9

  • Under 40: less stiff, less powerful
  • Over 40: stiffer, more powerful

3. Displacement/Length Ratio:  217

  • Under 100: Ultralight
  • 100 to 200: Light
  • 200 to 275: Moderate
  • 275 to 350: Heavy
  • Over 350: Ultraheavy

4. Comfort Ratio:  24.2

  • Under 20 indicates a lightweight racing boat
  • 20 to 30 indicates a coastal cruiser
  • 30 to 40 indicates a moderate offshore cruising boat
  • 40 to 50 indicates a heavy offshore boat
  • Over 50 indicates an extremely heavy offshore boat

5. Capsize Screening Formula:   2.0

  • Under 2.0 (the lower the better): Better suited for ocean passages
  • Over 2.0: Less suited for ocean passages

read more about these all-revealing numbers...

A Few FAQs...

Is the Hunter 33 still in production and, if not, when did production end and how many of these sailboats were built?

  • The original Hunter 33 was produced from 1977 to 1984 by Hunter Marine in Alachua, Florida. A total of 1,124 hulls were built during this period.
  • The second generation Hunter 33 was introduced in 2005 as an updated version of the previous model with some design changes and improvements. It was produced until 2011 by Hunter Marine in Alachua, Florida. A total of 623 hulls were built during this period.
  • The third generation Hunter 33 was launched in 2012 as a completely new design with a different hull shape, deck plan, rig configuration, interior layout, and features. It was produced until 2016 by Marlow-Hunter (formerly Hunter Marine) in Alachua, Florida.
  • The current generation Hunter E33 (also known as Marlow-Hunter E33) was introduced in 2017 as an electric hybrid version of the previous model with an Elco electric motor instead of a diesel engine. It is still in production by Marlow-Hunter in Alachua, Florida.

What, if any, alternative versions of the Hunter 33 were built and what are the differences between them?

The original Hunter 33:

  • was offered with two keel options - a standard fin keel with a draft of 5.25 feet, and a shoal draft keel with a draft of 4.0 feet.
  • had a masthead sloop rig with a single spreader and no backstay.
  • had a traditional transom with a small swim platform and ladder.
  • had an interior layout that featured a V-berth forward, a head to port, a hanging locker to starboard, a U-shaped dinette to port, a settee to starboard, an L-shaped galley to port, and a quarter berth to starboard.

The second-generation Hunter 33:

  • was also offered with two keel options - a standard fin keel with a draft of 4.5 feet, and a shoal draft wing keel with a draft of 4.0 feet.
  • had a fractional sloop rig with a single spreader and no backstay, but with swept-back spreaders and shrouds that provided more support for the mast.
  •  had a reverse transom with a larger swim platform and ladder.
  • had an interior layout that featured a V-berth forward, a head to starboard, a hanging locker to port, a U-shaped dinette to starboard, a settee to port, an L-shaped galley to starboard, and an aft cabin to port.

The third-generation Hunter 33:

  • was only offered with one keel option - a fin keel with a draft of 4.5 feet.
  • had a fractional sloop rig with a double spreader and no backstay, but with swept-back spreaders and shrouds that provided even more support for the mast.
  • had a raised reverse transom with an even larger swim platform and ladder, as well as an arch that supported the mainsheet traveler and the optional bimini and dodger.
  • had an interior layout that featured an island berth forward, a head to port, a hanging locker to starboard, an L-shaped dinette to port, two seats and a table to starboard, an L-shaped galley to port, and an aft cabin to starboard.

The current generation Hunter E33:

  • has the same transom as the third-generation Hunter 33.
  • has the same rig as the third-generation Hunter 33.
  • has the same interior layout as the third-generation Hunter 33.
  • is also only offered with one keel option - a fin keel with a draft of 4.5 feet.

How many people can sleep on board a Hunter 33?

  • The original Hunter 33 could sleep up to five people: two in the V-berth, two in the dinette (converted into a double berth), and one in the quarter berth.
  • The second-generation Hunter 33 could sleep up to six people: two in the V-berth, two in the dinette (converted into a double berth), two in the aft cabin (in either one double berth or two single berths).
  • The third-generation Hunter 33 could sleep up to six people: two in the island berth forward, two in the dinette (converted into a double berth), two in the aft cabin (in one double berth).
  • The current generation Hunter E33 can sleep up to six people: two in the island berth forward, two in the dinette (converted into a double berth), two in the aft cabin (in one double berth).

What is the history of the builders of the Hunter 33 and is the company still in business?

The builders of the Hunter 33 are Hunter Marine, which was founded in 1973 by Warren Luhrs, a successful sailboat racer who wanted to create affordable and high-quality sailboats for the mass market. The company started with a 25-foot boat called the Hunter 25, which was an instant success and sold over 2,000 units in its first year. The company then expanded its product line to include various models ranging from 15 to 50 feet in length.

The Hunter 33 was one of the most popular models, selling over 1,700 units in its first generation alone. The company also pioneered some innovative features such as the B&R rig (a fractional sloop rig with no backstay), the arch (a stainless steel structure that supports the mainsheet traveler and other accessories), and the electric hybrid propulsion system.

The company is still in business today, but under a different name and ownership. In 2012, Hunter Marine was acquired by David Marlow, a veteran boat builder who also owns Marlow Yachts, a luxury powerboat manufacturer.

The new company was renamed Marlow-Hunter and continued to produce sailboats under the Hunter brand name, as well as introducing new models under the Marlow brand name. The current product line includes sailboats from 15 to 50 feet in length, as well as powerboats from 37 to 97 feet in length.

What is the average cost of a secondhand Hunter 33?

The average cost of a secondhand Hunter 33 depends on the condition, age, equipment, and location of the boat. According to some online sources, the average cost of a secondhand Hunter 33 ranges from $20,000 to $150,000, depending on the generation and model year of the boat. For example, a 1980 original Hunter 33 in fair condition may cost around $20,000, while a 2016 third-generation Hunter 33 in excellent condition may cost around $150,000.

How does the Hunter 33 compare to other sailboats in its class?

The Hunter 33 is comparable to other sailboats in its class, such as the Catalina 34, the Beneteau Oceanis 331, and the Tartan 3400. These boats are all similar in size, design, and performance, but have some differences in features, quality, and price. Some of the comparisons are:

  • The Catalina 34 is slightly larger than the Hunter 33, with a length of 34.5 feet and a beam of 11.75 feet. It has a masthead sloop rig with a single spreader and a backstay, and a fin or wing keel with a draft of either 5.67 or 3.83 feet. It has an interior layout that features a V-berth forward, a head to port, a hanging locker to starboard, a U-shaped dinette to starboard, a settee to port, an L-shaped galley to port, and an aft cabin to starboard. It has a traditional transom with a small swim platform and ladder. It was produced from 1986 to 1999 by Catalina Yachts in Woodland Hills, California. A total of 1,438 hulls were built during this period. The Catalina 34 is known for its spacious interior, solid construction, and good performance. It is also more affordable than the Hunter 33, with an average cost of around $40,000 for a secondhand boat.
  • The Beneteau Oceanis 331 is slightly smaller than the Hunter 33, with a length of 33.1 feet and a beam of 11.3 feet. It has a fractional sloop rig with a single spreader and no backstay, but with swept-back spreaders and shrouds that provide more support for the mast. It has a fin or bulb keel with a draft of either 5.58 or 4.25 feet. It has an interior layout that features an island berth forward or two single berths forward (depending on the version), a head to starboard or port (depending on the version), a hanging locker to port or starboard (depending on the version), an L-shaped dinette to starboard or port (depending on the version), two seats and a table to port or starboard (depending on the version), an L-shaped galley to starboard or port (depending on the version), and an aft cabin to port or starboard (depending on the version). It has a reverse transom with a large swim platform and ladder. It was produced from 1999 to 2006 by Beneteau in France and South Carolina. The Beneteau Oceanis 331 is known for its modern design, versatile layout, and good performance. It is also more expensive than the Hunter 33, with an average cost of around $60,000 for a secondhand boat.
  • The Tartan 3400 is slightly larger than the Hunter 33, with a length of 34.4 feet and a beam of 11.25 feet. It has a fractional sloop rig with a double spreader and a backstay, and a fin or beavertail keel with a draft of either 6.5 or 4.75 feet. It has an interior layout that features a V-berth forward, a head to port, a hanging locker to starboard, an L-shaped dinette to port, two seats and a table to starboard, an L-shaped galley to port, and an aft cabin to starboard. It has a traditional transom with a small swim platform and ladder. It was produced from 2005 to present by Tartan Yachts in Fairport Harbor, Ohio. The Tartan 3400 is known for its classic style, high quality, and excellent performance. It is also more premium than the Hunter 33, with an average cost of around $120,000 for a secondhand boat.

The above answers were drafted by sailboat-cruising.com using GPT-4 (OpenAI’s large-scale language-generation model) as a research assistant to develop source material; to the best of our knowledge,  we believe them to be accurate.

Other sailboats in the Hunter range include:

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  • By Alvah Simon
  • Updated: November 12, 2012

sailboat data hunter 33

The boatbuilders at Marlow-Hunter , formerly known as Hunter Marine, may have been too successful, if that’s possible, with their prodigious production run of more than 600 Hunter 33 s. They found that the boat’s secondhand market was so vibrant that, in essence, they were competing against themselves for new-boat sales. They decided that by offering a new family cruiser of the same size but with significant innovations and upgrades, they might lure customers back into the new-boat market, and if they made the price very attractive, they might also entice trailer-sailors to make the leap up into a manageable keelboat.

The innovations and improvements found in the new and completely revamped Hunter 33 aren’t mere window dressing; they’re genuine leaps forward in speed, handling, comfort, and value. Always lurking is the risk of trying to squeeze too much into a small hull, such as larger cockpits, more spacious decks, increased interior volume, and a plethora of modern gadgetry. But Glen Henderson and the Hunter Design Group have found a superb balance in this package of upgrades.

The new hull still maintains Henderson’s signature hollow bow but now sports a trendy hard chine. By placing it beneath the waterline, Henderson sacrificed the cosmetic flourish of an elevated chine but found the sweet spot in terms of form stability and lateral resistance while under way.

Small but ultimately significant adjustments to the deck design add up to notable ergonomic efficiency. The cockpit pedestal has been moved back a few inches to create a larger cockpit area. A clever drop-down/walk-through transom adds to the usable space, and because this is a relatively high-sided vessel, it will be the preferred boarding point. The offset boarding ladder will come in handy for swimmers. The Lewmar wheel, when folded in, opens the access forward. But even in its full open position, it offers 10 inches of clearance between the wheel and the cockpit seats, giving the helmsman quick access to the sailing controls forward on the cabin top.

Two seats sculpted into the impregnable aft pulpit add to the already spacious outdoor social area. The steering pedestal is stout and holds an array of engine and navigational instruments, and it acts as the base for a sizable folding cockpit table.

It wouldn’t be a Hunter without the forward sloping arch with overhead, dual-ended mainsail sheeting. The headsail sheet winches are adequately sized and placed handy to the helm. Sheet wells built into the companionway bulkheads tame the abundance of sheets, halyards, and furling lines led aft to the cabin top.

There are ample stowage lockers, and the twin-bottle LPG locker is particularly well designed. I don’t like the three-washboard arrangement on a tapered companionway hatch, but this was the only fault I found in an otherwise excellent cockpit plan.

The deck has been redesigned with larger deadlights that allow more light below. Also, the lower shrouds have been moved inboard, creating an unencumbered flow forward. The new seahood covers the many lines leading aft, leaving a cleaner and, therefore, safer deck. The foredeck workspace is well thought out, with a small but adequate rode locker, a single roller, a recessed Lewmar windlass, and a snubbing cleat. The twin lifelines are coated but stand a minimal 23 inches high. I’d like to see this figure raised across the industry.

Though not touted as a performance cruiser, I found the 33 to be quick and responsive. Even with the in-mast furling option (not the fastest of sail plans), in only 5 to 7 knots of breeze, we maintained an honest 5.5 knots to windward and just under 5 with the wind on the beam. The 33 tacked effortlessly and tracked well. All in all, this is a slippery yet well-behaved hull.

Under power—the boat we tested had a 29-horsepower Yanmar diesel with saildrive—the vessel showed a good turn of speed, touching 6.5 knots at a cruising rpm and 7.5 when flat-out. (A 21-horsepower engine is also available.) It backed with precision and, due to the highly efficient balanced spade rudder, turned nearly in its own length. With the 33’s small size and snappy responsiveness, the boat should prove quite manageable in tight quarters.

sailboat data hunter 33

Where it really shines, however, is below. The interior is surprisingly spacious, bright, and well ventilated. Good handholds and the rounded teak companionway steps lead one safely below. A single full-size head and shower lie to starboard, across from a well-executed galley to port. The countertops are an attractive and practical white speckled Corian. A stainless-steel rail acts as both fiddle and handhold. The two-burner stove/oven is well fiddled but could use a little more angle when gimbaled. There’s a single but deep sink. The galley is large enough to work in conveniently but enclosed enough for safe use at sea.

The main saloon sports a very clever central table that’s built around a liquor/stowage cabinet. The table drops to create an additional berth. Across to starboard, a bench seat can be folded up to create a central cocktail table that doubles as the navigation station. Other amenities include a flat-screen TV and even an iPod docking station. Not mere gimmickry, this is a commitment to bringing the company’s styling, amenities, and electrical/mechanical systems up to the most modern of standards.

The owners cabin forward is bright, spacious, and offers good stowage spaces. The athwartship guest double lies in the stern to starboard.

The fit and finish are fine, and the overall cherry color and styling is pleasing to the eye. But more important, it must be noted again that this is only a 33-foot sailboat, and yet it contains two private cabins, a full-service galley, a spacious central saloon area, a full-size head and shower, and a navigation station—while still offering easy engine access and room to spare for generous stowage of gear.

The Hunter 33 shows no incongruities in its core concept. This is a contemporary-looking, modern-feeling coastal or near-offshore cruiser designed to take an entire family to sea in ease, style, and comfort. The good news is that it can do this at an amazingly attractive price. With that combination of looks, performance, and value, Marlow-Hunter may find itself faced again, perhaps in just a few years, with the same fortunate problem that its new 33 was designed to solve.

Two-time circumnavigator Alvah Simon is a Cruising World Boat of the Year judge for 2013.

View a full photo gallery for the Hunter 33 here . Check out more boat reviews here .

  • More: 2011+ , 31 - 40 ft , Boat of the Year , Coastal Cruising , marlow-hunter , monohull , Sailboat Reviews , Sailboats
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  • Sailboat Reviews

New Boat Review: Hunter 33

Redesigned family cruising boat sports new transom and deck plan..

sailboat data hunter 33

Photos courtesy of Hunter Marine

The new Hunter 33 had the odds stacked against it from the get-go.

The 33-foot family cruiser debuted in the fall of 2011, when the domestic sailboat market was stuck in a ditch, marketing budgets were slashed, and the U.S. boating industry was grasping at threads of good news. Four months later, Hunter Marine’s parent group Luhrs Marine filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection.

Against all odds, however, the 33 is selling well. More than 60 have been ordered since the boat was introduced, and all but a few that have been built have been sold. It is one of Hunter’s best debuts since the 2008 downturn.

Looking ahead, the bankruptcy filing should be a boon for Hunter, as it will unshackle the sailboat side of the business from the struggling powerboat brands. Hunter, which converted to an employee-owned operation in 1996, expects to be out of the bankruptcy weeds by the end of July.

Seldén roller-furling drum

While new ownership appears in the offing for Hunter, co-founder Warren Luhrs will likely still have a stake. Luhrs—who’s 80-day sail from New York to San Francisco set a record in 1989—helped redefine Hunter in the 1990s. Under his leadership, design innovations by the late Swedish engineer Lars Bergstrom (the “B” in Hunter’s signature backstayless B&R rig) and faster hulls from designer Glen Henderson helped propel Hunter’s makeover through the last two decades.

“We have several very promising buyers interested, one in particular, but we can’t say anything right now,” said Greg Emerson, Hunter’s chief of public relations. The company has secured financing from Bank of America to help with the transition, allowing Hunter to continue full operations and provide warranty support without interruption.

Of the big three American boatbuilders (Catalina and Beneteau USA are the other two), Hunter reached the farthest outside the box as the traditional boat market sagged. The hybrid powerboat-sailboat Hunter Edge introduced in 2009 was a sharp departure from its usual fare. In 2010, it launched the Elco-powered electric hybrid e27. And last year, Hunter debuted the electric hybrid e36. The new Hunter 33, by comparison, is a case study in incremental changes. Below the waterline, it is virtually identical to the previous Hunter 33, of which 623 hulls were between 2005 and 2011.

Starting in the mid-1990s, Henderson began revamping the Hunter fleet, exploring ways to boost performance, make sailing easier, and create interior space for the creature comforts that Hunter owners expect. The new 33 bears Henderson’s signature changes—beam carried well aft to increase interior volume below, a concave hollow in the bow and shallow forefoot to reduce pitching motion, and a fractional rig to make maneuvering under sail easier. Trickling down from the ocean racing realm, hard chines are the new trend in the recreational market. Henderson located the new 33’s chine at the waterline, to aid in tracking when the boat is heeled.

One of three designers we spoke with in Practical Sailor’s 2005 designers conference, Henderson emphasized the importance of the rudder in providing lift. Like previous Henderson designs, the 33’s elliptical rudder is fairly large, and the keel is conservatively proportioned, allowing sufficient lead—the fore-and-aft distance between the center of effort and the center of lateral resistance—to make for a well-balanced sailer. (See PS, February 2009, “The Balancing Act.”) Hunter offers a 4-foot-6-inch shoal-draft version and 5-foot-6-inch deep draft of the new 33.

The boat’s excitement factor will depend a great deal on the sail plan. Henderson is a firm proponent of the fractional rig, with an easily tacked 110-percent furling jib. To up the fun-factor in light-air, a Code 0 asymmetrical sail will be a good investment.

For the mainsail, Hunter offers two options. Most buyers opt for the in-mast furling rig, an attractive choice for weekend cruisers who don’t want the hassles of setting and stowing a mainsail. Performance enthusiasts should opt for the standard rig. A full-battened, fat-head mainsail will significantly boost horsepower: The mast is shorter (by nearly 5 feet), lighter, and more aerodynamic than the furling mast.

Foregoing a furling main has trade-offs. Hunter’s overhead arch puts the aft end of the sail high above the cockpit, making setting and dousing a full-batten sail more of a chore, particularly if a full bimini is part of the picture. To simplify stowage, Hunter offers a self-stowing sailcover system with lazy jacks similar to those we looked at in our February 2008 article “Taming the Main.”

The clearest difference between the new 33 and the previous version is the new deck plan. The previous model had a walk-through transom that opened onto a stern boarding platform. The new model has a hinged transom cutout that folds down to create a swim platform that offers more area than the previous platform. As a result, the cockpit is larger, the main cabin can move aft, and the berth below the cockpit gains more space.

One big benefit of the larger cockpit, strictly from a cruising standpoint, is the bigger cockpit table. Featuring twin drop-down leaves hinged along the centerline, the 33’s table has a catch-all bin at its base—great for sunscreen, winch handles, and gloves—that doubles as a foot brace. There is plenty of room to move around the folded table, and older sailors will appreciate the extra handhold.

The previous model’s more secure—and unattractive, in our view—bathtub wrap-around coaming is gone. Instead, port and starboard lockers (starboard for propane tanks) are aft. The cockpit seats are technically too short for snoozing (4 feet, 9 inches by 1 foot, 6 inches), but seat cushions raise the seats up to the same level of the lazarettes, so you effectively have 5 feet, 7 inches to stretch out. Head clearance under the arch is 6 feet. A 4-inch bridgedeck keeps water from sloshing below. Lexan hatchboards stow in a dedicated storage bin in the port cockpit locker, ready as needed offshore.

Our test boat from Massey Marine in Palmetto, Fla., was equipped with the Mariner Package, which includes the overhead arch, an upgraded 29-horsepower Yanmar, Seldén in-mast mainsail furling with a rigid boom vang, a helm sheeting package for the jib, and the optional folding Lewmar steering wheel. It also had upgraded No. 30 Lewmar winches for reefing and furling lines; No. 16 winches are standard. A high-aspect canvas dodger and full-length cockpit canvas rounded out the package.

Sail control is easily managed from the cockpit. Halyards, reefing, and furling lines lead back to ganged Spinlock rope clutches at each side of the companionway. Molded line bins keep tails and toes from becoming ensnared. Mainsail control—both the traveler and mainsheet—can be reached from the helm, although the test boat’s full canvas awning made it hard to monitor the sheet tension and traveler car position, even with a cutout window over the helm. While mid-boom sheeting found on other boats doesn’t suffer this problem, Hunter sensibly prefers end-of-boom sheeting, which minimizes the loads on hardware and humans.

The 19-inch-high coaming offers security in a knock-down, but makes for a big step down to the sidedecks. While hardly expansive, the sidedecks allow easy passage fore and aft. Ample handholds and a low toerail offer security when moving forward. A reconfigured rig, with lower shrouds well inboard, also opens up the passage forward.

Six amply sized cleats (two at the bow, one on each stern quarter, and two amidship) handle docklines, but the stern cleats are vertically oriented, making them harder to access and poorly aligned with dock loads.

The self-draining anchor locker, single bow roller (two rollers are an option), and windlass gear meet the needs of a weekend sailor. This is a standard design on boats of this size, geared more toward aesthetics than midnight anchor drills on a pitching deck. (The more sensible hawse pipe is too much trouble for today’s sailors, it seems.) The anchor locker is relatively shallow, a poor match for someone who likes to pile on rode or carry two anchors. A locker divider is optional.

Most of the sailing hardware is Seldén gear, and this equipment has done very well in our previous tests. Seldén’s 200s Furlex, top rated in our August 2009 test, handles jib furling duties. Seldén’s in-mast furler and rigid vang help tame the mainsail, and Seldén’s top-rated bullet blocks (PS, June 2011) handle mainsheet loads. This is Hunter’s first big boat to feature Seldén’s mainsheet traveler.

The new 33 is the first Hunter model with a saildrive. The standard engine is the 21-horsepower Yanmar 3YM20, but our test boat featured the 29-horsepower 3YM30, which has a shaft output of 27 horsepower. The engine is mounted with the flywheel facing aft, so the gearbox and saildrive mounts and seals are easy to inspect and monitor. Access to the water pump, alternator, and drive belts is through a door in the aft cabin.

Yanmar recommends that this engine be hauled out, inspected, and serviced annually. Paint failure and corrosion on the aluminum lower unit are the chief concerns, so zincs need to be changed routinely, and the paint coating needs to be closely monitored. Copper-loaded bottom paints on the drive are a big no-no. If you live in a tropical climate and are trying to stretch your haulout intervals to three years, you may want to re-think the advantages of having a saildrive.

Saildrives simplify the builder’s job, and their only real advantages for the sailer are reduced underwater drag and some noise reduction. The standard prop is a bronze two-blade prop. Our test boat came with a folding two-blade prop. For long-term reliability and fewer maintenance headaches, we still prefer a conventional drive shaft system.

The boat’s standard systems are handled professionally and are adequate for daysailing, but most sailors will opt for a cruise-ready package, which includes some things we’d consider essential. There is also an iTech upgrade featuring additional HDMI and USB cabling and a cell-phone booster antenna for those who want to stay connected.

Bronze through-hulls have replaced the Marelon versions used on previous models. All seacocks are easily accessible and well labeled. Wiring and plumbing systems closely adhere to norms set by the American Boat and Yacht Council. The 25-gallon fuel tank is polyethylene. We prefer high-grade aluminum for fuel (PS, May 2007). The tank is well supported on all sides and small enough that the rotomolded tank’s biggest drawback—the difficulty of installing leak-free inspection ports—isn’t a major issue.

Hunter’s interior arrangements are among its strongest selling points. The computer-cut interior panels are assembled in modules outside the boat, significantly reducing labor cost. Joints, doors, and lockers that require skilled carpentry are pre-built and fitted in the workshop, where they can get the attention they deserve.

You won’t find finished edges on all plywood panels, but the warm cherry veneer, the creative use of space, and a few practical touches create an interior that is surprisingly roomy and comfortable for a boat of this size.

The extra space gained by pushing the cockpit aft allowed Hunter to angle the steps inboard, so one can walk down facing forward, with excellent handholds on either side of the companionway.

Headroom is 6 feet, 2 inches. White foam-backed material covers the overhead and sides. The material is held in place by grooved plastic track and can be removed and re-installed (with a special roller) to access deck hardware. This allows Hunter to through-bolt all hardware through a backing plate.

The main cabin and galley are well lit with big side windows, and two flush, frameless overhead hatches—one opening forward, the other opening aft—provide ventilation. The forward V-berth has its own hatch, and the aft cabin in the starboard quarter has a larger-than-queen-size bed, two ports and a fairly large hatch in the port settee. These hatches don’t get a whole lot of breeze in a still anchorage, but the space is much airier than that of previous models.

The galley is well-appointed, with a gimbaled, two-burner Force 10 stove and oven, and a single, deep sink. So long as you don’t need access to lockers or the ice-box (or optional freezer), there’s more than enough counter-space. Our test boat had a minimally insulated, front-opening fridge. These self-contained units work well for daysailing and dockside entertaining, but can be real energy hogs away from shore. A top-loading freezer/fridge with better insulation is an option.

The starboard head doubles as a shower, which has its own sump. The space’s snug fore-and-aft dimensions allow for a sleeping-length settee to starboard and the spacious aft cabin.

The dinette table has a slightly raised, fiddled catch-all for food, drinks, iPods, Barbie dolls, Legos, whatever. Beneath the vertical structure is a hand crank that raises and lowers the table, quickly converting it into a long 4-foot-4-inch-wide berth. This is a slick, one-person operation. Similarly, the center section of the starboard settee flips inboard to convert into a coffee table or small chart table.

Hunter’s small headsail

Photo courtesy of Hunter Marine

Performance

We tested the boat in protected waters on the Bradenton River, Fla., in 10 to 12 knots northwest wind. A quarter-knot incoming tide was nearly aligned with the wind, and the following data, recorded by the GPS on our Velocitek ProStart, compensates for this current.

At 2,600 rpm, the upgraded 29-horsepower engine with a 13-inch, two-bladed folding Gori prop pushed the boat at 6.5 knots. At wide-open throttle, 3,400 rpm, the average speed was 7.3 knots and the wake was clean. The boat easily spun 180 degrees in little more than a single boat length, and it maneuvered easily under power in both forward and reverse. The engine was quiet with very little vibration at either speed, only slightly noisier at the higher rpm, registering 77 decibels in the center of the main saloon and in the cockpit with the companionway open. (Conversation is about 60-70 decibels.)

Even with shoal-draft and an in-mast furling mainsail that had no vertical battens, the test boat climbed to windward well; we would expect much better performance with the deep keel version and the standard mainsail.

Tacking angles were between 90 and 94 degrees. Close-reaching with the wind 45 degrees true and a relative windspeed of 14 knots, the boat made 4.9 knots over ground. Cracking off to 50 degrees true wind angle, the speed jumped to 6.4 knots. The fastest sustained speed was 6.5 knots at 70 degrees true, in 14 knots apparent wind.

Reaching between 130 and 160 degrees off the wind, the boat averaged between 5 and 5.5 knots. Apparent windspeed off the wind was between 6 and 8 knots, perfect conditions for an asymmetrical, although our test boat was not equipped with one. Throughout the test sail, the helm was exceptionally well balanced, even off the wind, and the boat accelerated nicely in puffs.

For a new, entry-level family cruiser, the Hunter 33 has a lot going for it. The $160,000 sailaway price is attractive; the five-year warranty on the hull is transferrable. A one-year stem-to-stern warranty covers major components, including things like refrigerators and windlasses.

Our tester was impressed by the excellent use of space in a boat of this size, both belowdecks and in the cockpit. In this respect, it is a big improvement over the previous Hunter 33.

Second was its performance on the water. Even with a battenless mainsail, this was a fun boat to sail. We’d encourage a stickler for performance to opt for the full-batten main.

Two concerns, in our view, are the standard iron keel and the sail drive, but you can’t expect a company like Hunter, for which pricing is a key sales point, to fight against market trends. A lead keel is an option for the Hunter 33, and is well worth the extra $9,800, in our view.

If you are having the boat hauled annually to ensure that the keel coating remains intact and the sail drive maintenance regimen is followed, you will avoid the problems that can crop up down the road. Certainly, around-the-can racing sailors will appreciate the reduced drag of the sail drive.

Hunter has had many years to learn what its customers like, and the variety of options in this boat will appeal to a wide range of sailors. We expect it to continue to sell well in this size range, and consider it a good fit for a coastal cruising family.

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Hunter 33 2

The hunter 33 2 is a 33.5ft b&r designed by glenn henderson and built in fiberglass by hunter marine (usa) since 2004..

The Hunter 33 2 is a light sailboat which is a reasonably good performer. It is reasonably stable / stiff and has a low righting capability if capsized. It is best suited as a coastal cruiser. The fuel capacity is originally small. There is a short water supply range.

Hunter 33 2 sailboat under sail

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Hunter 33 - 2004 Shoal draft

Sailboat specifications.

  • Last update: 10th April 2020

Hunter 33 - 2004's main features

Hunter 33 - 2004's main dimensions, hunter 33 - 2004's rig and sails, hunter 33 - 2004's performances, hunter 33 - 2004's auxiliary engine, hunter 33 - 2004's accommodations and layout.

Marlow Hunter Hunter 33 - 2004  Picture extracted from the commercial documentation © Marlow Hunter

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Hunter 33-2

Hunter 33-2 is a 33 ′ 5 ″ / 10.2 m monohull sailboat designed by Glenn Henderson and built by Hunter Marine starting in 2004.

Rig and Sails

Auxilary power, accomodations, calculations.

The theoretical maximum speed that a displacement hull can move efficiently through the water is determined by it's waterline length and displacement. It may be unable to reach this speed if the boat is underpowered or heavily loaded, though it may exceed this speed given enough power. Read more.

Classic hull speed formula:

Hull Speed = 1.34 x √LWL

Max Speed/Length ratio = 8.26 ÷ Displacement/Length ratio .311 Hull Speed = Max Speed/Length ratio x √LWL

Sail Area / Displacement Ratio

A measure of the power of the sails relative to the weight of the boat. The higher the number, the higher the performance, but the harder the boat will be to handle. This ratio is a "non-dimensional" value that facilitates comparisons between boats of different types and sizes. Read more.

SA/D = SA ÷ (D ÷ 64) 2/3

  • SA : Sail area in square feet, derived by adding the mainsail area to 100% of the foretriangle area (the lateral area above the deck between the mast and the forestay).
  • D : Displacement in pounds.

Ballast / Displacement Ratio

A measure of the stability of a boat's hull that suggests how well a monohull will stand up to its sails. The ballast displacement ratio indicates how much of the weight of a boat is placed for maximum stability against capsizing and is an indicator of stiffness and resistance to capsize.

Ballast / Displacement * 100

Displacement / Length Ratio

A measure of the weight of the boat relative to it's length at the waterline. The higher a boat’s D/L ratio, the more easily it will carry a load and the more comfortable its motion will be. The lower a boat's ratio is, the less power it takes to drive the boat to its nominal hull speed or beyond. Read more.

D/L = (D ÷ 2240) ÷ (0.01 x LWL)³

  • D: Displacement of the boat in pounds.
  • LWL: Waterline length in feet

Comfort Ratio

This ratio assess how quickly and abruptly a boat’s hull reacts to waves in a significant seaway, these being the elements of a boat’s motion most likely to cause seasickness. Read more.

Comfort ratio = D ÷ (.65 x (.7 LWL + .3 LOA) x Beam 1.33 )

  • D: Displacement of the boat in pounds
  • LOA: Length overall in feet
  • Beam: Width of boat at the widest point in feet

Capsize Screening Formula

This formula attempts to indicate whether a given boat might be too wide and light to readily right itself after being overturned in extreme conditions. Read more.

CSV = Beam ÷ ³√(D / 64)

Dimensions above are with shoal draft and furling mast. Also available with deep draft keel: 5.5’/1.67m Deep draft ballast: 3455 lbs./ 1569 kg Standard rig… Mast height: 46.58’/ 14.20m SA: 625 sq ft / 58.1 sq m P = 36.42’ / 11.10m E = 13.83’ / 4.22m Optional 29hp engine

An updated version was introduced in 2012 Also referred to as the E33. Same hull and rig. Larger cockpit, deck layout changed plus a swim platform was added. Displacement = 12,400 lbs / 5624 kg

Thanks to Adam Hunt for the photo of the H33-2.

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Marlow-Hunter, LLC

The 33 – compact cruiser of the year.

Marlow Hunter The 33

360 Marlow-Hunter 33 Virtual Tour »

boat-of-the-year

The Award-Winning Marlow-Hunter 33 is a stunning sailing yacht. Keeping with the Hunter of yesterday’s signature window line gives this yacht the sleek feel of the latest Marlow-Hunters, but the improvements do not end there. The hull design has been improved, featuring a wider beam further aft as well as a more profound bow hollow. The result of this hull design is a longer dynamic waterline, which means more speed. The deck features a sleek, modern profile with large side windows allowing for increased interior light. The deck hatches are flush-mount, offering an enhanced look that complements the new profile. Lengthening the cockpit has allowed the Marlow-Hunter 33 to have a cockpit that is longer than its predecessor. The cockpit of the Marlow-Hunter 33 also features a fold-down swim platform that extends the already lengthy cockpit when folded down while the boat is docked or at anchor.

Extending the cockpit allows for a larger master aft cabin that features more headroom. Overall, the interior has been enhanced with a richer look and feel. Enhancements start at the sole of the interior which features a hardwood flooring look that accentuates the true beauty of the Marlow-Hunter 33’s interior. Corian galley countertops feature complementing stainless steel fiddles that not only keep items from falling off the countertops in a seaway but also serve as excellent hand holds when moving about below. The interior wood used for the bulkheads as well as cabinet doors has been rotated 90 degrees so that the wood grain runs horizontally instead of vertically. Not only does this add a crisp modern touch to the interior, it also gives the eye an impression of a larger interior space.

The salon features several intelligent enhancements. To starboard, the comfortable settee features a center section that easily flips up to create a convenient chart table. The beauty of this system is its robust design…and no moving parts to wear out! To port, the elegant dinette sports Marlow-Hunter’s unique Easy Lift system. With a few simple cranks, the dinette table lowers to form the base of a double sleeper sofa. Above, near the overhead, Marlow-Hunter has thoughtfully provided flat, fiddle-protected cabinet tops that supply even more storage space.

Sail away on a Marlow-Hunter 33 for $148,998.

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IMAGES

  1. 1980 Hunter 33 Sail Boat For Sale

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  2. Hunter 33

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  6. 1979 Hunter 33' Sailboat

COMMENTS

  1. HUNTER 33

    Comfort ratio = D ÷ (.65 x (.7 LWL + .3 LOA) x Beam^1.33), where displacement is expressed in pounds, and length is expressed in feet. Capsize Screening Formula (CSF): Designed to determine if a boat has blue water capability.

  2. The Hunter 33 sailboat

    The Hunter 33 is a popular American sailboat that was designed by John Cherubini and first built in 1977 by Hunter Marine. It has a masthead sloop rig, a fixed fin keel, an inboard motor, and is known for its spacious interior, easy handling and good performance. The boat has undergone several revisions and updates over the years, and has been ...

  3. Hunter 33

    DESIGNER Glenn Henderson/ Hunter Design Team. BUILDER Hunter Marine, Alachua, FL, 386-462-3077. Photos courtesy of Hunter Marine. The last iteration of the Hunter 33, introduced in 2005, was a big hit for the Alachua, Florida company. Its balance of value, volume and performance struck a chord with sailors.

  4. Hunter 33

    The Hunter 33 is a 32.67ft masthead sloop designed by Cherubini and built in fiberglass by Hunter Marine (USA) since 1977. ... The data on this page has been derived from different sources but a significant part is attributed to sailboatdata.com. We thank them for their encouragements and friendly collaboration.

  5. Hunter 33 Sailboat Review

    Hunter 33. Fine performance and vast amenities abound in this versatile, upgraded 33-footer. Boat Review from our November 2012 issue. The boatbuilders at Marlow-Hunter, formerly known as Hunter Marine, may have been too successful, if that's possible, with their prodigious production run of more than 600 Hunter 33 s.

  6. Hunter 33: A Stronger, Roomier Production Sailboat

    The interior finish adds to the richness with tongue-and-groove flooring and a high-gloss cherry veneer. The grain has been laid out on the bulkheads horizontally, which gives the salon a larger feel. The base price of the Hunter 33 with freight and commissioning is $120,000, and if you add the Mariner package, it goes up to $130,000.

  7. New Boat Review: Hunter 33

    Hunter offers a 4-foot-6-inch shoal-draft version and 5-foot-6-inch deep draft of the new 33. The boat's excitement factor will depend a great deal on the sail plan. Henderson is a firm proponent of the fractional rig, with an easily tacked 110-percent furling jib. To up the fun-factor in light-air, a Code 0 asymmetrical sail will be a good ...

  8. Hunter 33

    The Hunter 33 is an American sailboat that was designed by John Cherubini and first built in 1977. The design was originally marketed by the manufacturer as the Hunter 33, but is often confused with the 2004 Hunter 33-2004, which was also sold as the Hunter 33, and the 2012 Hunter E33, which is in production as the Marlow-Hunter 33. ...

  9. Hunter 33

    As with Henderson's previous designs, the new Hunter 33 carries its beam well aft to provide for considerable interior volume. The boat has a large aft master cabin, serious headroom, a long list of features, plenty of stowage, and—of course—a "comfortable" saloon. Hunter Marine, Alachua, FL; tel. 800-771-5556.

  10. Hunter 33

    Hunter 33 is a 32 ′ 8 ″ / 10 m ... Source: sailboatdata.com / CC BY. Embed Embed. View Demo. Embed this page on your own website by copying and pasting this code. For Sale View More . Midland, ON, CA 2004 Hunter 33 $74,025 USD. Annapolis, MD, US ...

  11. Hunter 33 2

    The Hunter 33 2 is a 33.5ft b&r designed by Glenn Henderson and built in fiberglass by Hunter Marine (USA) since 2004. The Hunter 33 2 is a light sailboat which is a reasonably good performer. It is reasonably stable / stiff and has a low righting capability if capsized. It is best suited as a coastal cruiser.

  12. Hunter 33-2

    The Hunter 33-2, also referred to as the Hunter 33-2004, is an American sailboat, that was designed by Glenn Henderson and first built in 2004.. The design was marketed as the Hunter 33, but is referred to as the Hunter 33-2004 or 33-2, to differentiate it from the other models that Hunter Marine has marketed under the same name, including the 1977 Hunter 33 and the 2012 Hunter E33, which ...

  13. Hunter 33

    The Hunter 33 - 2004 is a 33'1" (10.08m) cruising sailboat designed by Hunter Design (United States) and Glenn Henderson (United States). She was built between 2004 and 2012 by Marlow Hunter (United States). The Shoal draft version is offered with a short keel fitted with large winglets. This configuration provides an interesting draft / low center of gravity / upwind performance trade-off.

  14. Hunter 33

    What is surprising about the Hunter 33 is the level of fit and finish. The overall quality is impressive, especially for a boat that can be purchased for less than $100,000. From small but important standard features like all bronze through-hull fittings below the waterline, to construction techniques and materials that include lead keels and ...

  15. Hunter 33 boats for sale

    Find Hunter 33 boats for sale in your area & across the world on YachtWorld. Offering the best selection of Hunter boats to choose from.

  16. Hunter 33-2

    An updated version was introduced in 2012 Also referred to as the E33. Same hull and rig. Larger cockpit, deck layout changed plus a swim platform was added. Displacement = 12,400 lbs / 5624 kg. Thanks to Adam Hunt for the photo of the H33-2. Suggest Improvements. Source: sailboatdata.com / CC BY.

  17. Hunter 33 Sail Data

    Complete Sail Plan Data for the Hunter 33 Sail Data. Sailrite offers free rig and sail dimensions with featured products and canvas kits that fit the boat. ... Sailboat Data ; Hunter 33 Sail Data ; Hunter 33 Sail Data. Pinit. SKU: X-SD-6014 . Quantity discounts available . Quantity Price; Quantity -+ Add to Cart . You may also like. Anchor ...

  18. PDF -- Drawings on Below Pages for Cherubini Hunter 30 and 33 -- From the

    a_ Hunter 33 PLUMBING DIAGRAM SUBSYSTEMS: FRESH WATER wASTE DISPOSAL DRAINS HOSE COLD WATER) 5/8' WH HOSE (HOT WATER) 3/4" SHIELDVAC (W/CUFFS) 1-1/2" SHIELD/AC CW/CUFFS) 1-1/4" SHIELDFCEX (GREEN) 1-1/2" SHIELDFCEX GREEN) THRU HULL (PLASTIC) THRU HULL (BRONZE) DECK PLATE (WATER) DECK CWASTE) SALT WATER & WASTE VENTS GATE VALVE 9 HEAD DETAIL 3/4 ...

  19. The 33

    The Award-Winning Marlow-Hunter 33 is a stunning sailing yacht. Keeping with the Hunter of yesterday's signature window line gives this yacht the sleek feel of the latest Marlow-Hunters, but the improvements do not end there. The hull design has been improved, featuring a wider beam further aft as well as a more profound bow hollow.

  20. The Protesters and the President

    Featuring Jonathan Wolfe and Peter Baker. Produced by Diana Nguyen , Luke Vander Ploeg , Alexandra Leigh Young, Nina Feldman and Carlos Prieto. Edited by Lisa Chow and Michael Benoist. Original ...