• More from M-W
  • To save this word, you'll need to log in. Log In

Definition of catamaran

Illustration of catamaran, examples of catamaran in a sentence.

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'catamaran.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Tamil kaṭṭumaram , from kaṭṭu to tie + maram tree, wood

1673, in the meaning defined above

Dictionary Entries Near catamaran

Cite this entry.

“Catamaran.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary , Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/catamaran. Accessed 19 Jun. 2024.

Kids Definition

Kids definition of catamaran, more from merriam-webster on catamaran.

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for catamaran

Nglish: Translation of catamaran for Spanish Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about catamaran

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!

Play Quordle: Guess all four words in a limited number of tries.  Each of your guesses must be a real 5-letter word.

Can you solve 4 words at once?

Word of the day.

See Definitions and Examples »

Get Word of the Day daily email!

Popular in Grammar & Usage

Plural and possessive names: a guide, more commonly misspelled words, your vs. you're: how to use them correctly, every letter is silent, sometimes: a-z list of examples, more commonly mispronounced words, popular in wordplay, 8 words for lesser-known musical instruments, birds say the darndest things, 10 words from taylor swift songs (merriam's version), 10 scrabble words without any vowels, 12 more bird names that sound like insults (and sometimes are), games & quizzes.

Play Blossom: Solve today's spelling word game by finding as many words as you can using just 7 letters. Longer words score more points.

  • Daily Crossword
  • Word Puzzle
  • Word Finder
  • Word of the Day
  • Synonym of the Day
  • Word of the Year
  • Language stories
  • All featured
  • Gender and sexuality
  • All pop culture
  • Writing hub
  • Grammar essentials
  • Commonly confused
  • All writing tips
  • Pop culture
  • Writing tips

Advertisement

[ kat- uh -m uh - ran , kat - uh -m uh -ran ]

  • a vessel, usually propelled by sail, formed of two hulls or floats held side by side by a frame above them. Compare trimaran .
  • a float or sailing raft formed of a number of logs lashed together, used in certain parts of India, South America, etc.
  • Canadian Dialect. a wooden sled.

/ ˌkætəməˈræn /

  • a sailing, or sometimes motored, vessel with twin hulls held parallel by a rigid framework
  • a primitive raft made of logs lashed together
  • old-fashioned. a quarrelsome woman

Discover More

Word history and origins.

Origin of catamaran 1

Example Sentences

It involved a private island tour, catamaran cruise, visiting Rihanna’s childhood home and more.

We were about to sail back to Puerto Vallarta, but the catamaran barely moved.

I think the crew just didn’t know how to maneuver the catamaran very well, the sea was not very rough nor was it too windy.

I can paddle my catamaran against both wind and tide; why cannot you do the same?

They never tired, I think, of seeing me handle my giant “catamaran” and the (to them) mysterious harpoon.

We also started building a catamaran, with which to navigate the river when the floods had subsided.

She had easily forced a way for the catamaran through the branches, and once past, had drawn them together again.

Yamba cried out to me to lie flat on the catamaran, and hold on as tightly as I could until we reached smooth water again.

Related Words

Cambridge Dictionary

  • Cambridge Dictionary +Plus

Meaning of catamaran in English

Your browser doesn't support HTML5 audio

  • cabin cruiser
  • dragon boat
  • rubber dinghy
  • As soon as the boat anchored, a catamaran put out, and brought Charlie and his followers to shore.  
  • Next morning we were visited by a party of natives from the neighbouring island, consisting of six men in a canoe, and one on a catamaran or raft.  
  • Soon we were surrounded with catamarans and canoes, with three or four natives in each.  
  • The horses and cows were taken on a species of catamaran, or large raft, that is much used in those mild seas, and which sail reasonably well a little off the wind, and not very badly on.  
  • When we reached the lagoon, a catamaran with three natives on it came off to us.  

Examples of catamaran

Translations of catamaran.

Get a quick, free translation!

{{randomImageQuizHook.quizId}}

Word of the Day

(especially of earth or crops) dried out because of too much heat and not enough rain

Fakes and forgeries (Things that are not what they seem to be)

Fakes and forgeries (Things that are not what they seem to be)

meaning of catamaran in english

Learn more with +Plus

  • Recent and Recommended {{#preferredDictionaries}} {{name}} {{/preferredDictionaries}}
  • Definitions Clear explanations of natural written and spoken English English Learner’s Dictionary Essential British English Essential American English
  • Grammar and thesaurus Usage explanations of natural written and spoken English Grammar Thesaurus
  • Pronunciation British and American pronunciations with audio English Pronunciation
  • English–Chinese (Simplified) Chinese (Simplified)–English
  • English–Chinese (Traditional) Chinese (Traditional)–English
  • English–Dutch Dutch–English
  • English–French French–English
  • English–German German–English
  • English–Indonesian Indonesian–English
  • English–Italian Italian–English
  • English–Japanese Japanese–English
  • English–Norwegian Norwegian–English
  • English–Polish Polish–English
  • English–Portuguese Portuguese–English
  • English–Spanish Spanish–English
  • English–Swedish Swedish–English
  • Dictionary +Plus Word Lists
  • English    Noun
  • Translations
  • All translations

To add catamaran to a word list please sign up or log in.

Add catamaran to one of your lists below, or create a new one.

{{message}}

Something went wrong.

There was a problem sending your report.

  • TheFreeDictionary
  • Word / Article
  • Starts with
  • Free toolbar & extensions
  • Word of the Day
  • Free content

cat·a·ma·ran

Cat•a•ma•ran.

- a sailboat with two parallel hulls held together by single deck , - a small sailing vessel; usually with a single mast
  • let the cat out of the bag
  • sailing boat
  • surface-effect ship
  • cataloged procedure
  • catalogue raisonné
  • cataloguize
  • Catalpa bignioides
  • Catalpa speciosa
  • catalytic attack
  • catalytic converter
  • catalytic cracker
  • catalytic cracking
  • Catalytic force
  • catalytic war
  • catalytically
  • catamountain
  • Catanadromous
  • Catananche caerulea
  • cat-and-dog
  • cat-and-mouse
  • Catapetalous
  • cataphatism
  • cataphonics
  • cataphoresis
  • catalytically cracked gasoline
  • catalytically-blown asphalt
  • Catalyzed Diesel Particulate Filter
  • Catalyzed Electrochemical Plutonium Oxide Dissolution/Dissolver
  • Catalyzed Signal Amplification
  • Catalyzing the Creation and Exchange of Local Content
  • Catamaran Association of Biscayne Bay
  • Catamaran History
  • Catamaran Racing Association of Wisconsin
  • catamenial epilepsy
  • catamenial hemothorax
  • Catamenial pneumothorax
  • catamenially
  • catamnestic
  • Facebook Share

All resources related to 'catamaran'

Definitions of 'catamaran', pronunciations of 'catamaran'.

IPA Pronunciation Guide

Examples of 'catamaran'  in a sentence

Translations of 'catamaran'.

Quick word challenge

Quiz Review

Score: 0 / 5

Image

Wordle Helper

Tile

Scrabble Tools

Image

  • 1.1 Etymology
  • 1.2 Pronunciation
  • 1.3.1 Synonyms
  • 1.3.2 Hypernyms
  • 1.3.3 Hyponyms
  • 1.3.4 Coordinate terms
  • 1.3.5 Derived terms
  • 1.3.6 Related terms
  • 1.3.7 Descendants
  • 1.3.8 Translations
  • 2.1 Etymology
  • 2.2 Pronunciation
  • 2.4 Further reading
  • 3.1 Etymology
  • 4.1 Etymology
  • 4.2.1 Declension

meaning of catamaran in english

From Tamil கட்டுமரம் ( kaṭṭumaram ) , from கட்டு ( kaṭṭu , “ to tie ” ) +‎ மரம் ( maram , “ tree, wood ” ) .

Pronunciation

  • ( UK ) IPA ( key ) : /ˌkæ.tə.məˈɹæn/ , /ˈkæ.tə.məˌɹæn/
  • ( Canada , US ) IPA ( key ) : /ˈkæ.tə.məˌɹæn/ , /ˌkæ.tə.məˈɹæn/
CA synth: ( )

catamaran ( plural catamarans )

  • 1838 , [Letitia Elizabeth] Landon (indicated as editor), chapter XV, in Duty and Inclination:   [ … ] , volume II, London: Henry Colburn ,   [ … ] , →OCLC , page 218 : Swift over the seas the vessel drives; Madras appears in sight. The first object catching the eye, upon the anchor being cast, was an Indian upon his catamaran , who, making a sudden motion, sprung to the side of the ship, grappled there for a moment, and the next was on the deck.
  • 1889 , William Makepeace Thackeray, Hobson's Choice : She meddles with my prescriptions for your wife; she doctors the infant in private: you'll never have a quiet house or a quiet wife as long as that old Catamaran is here.
  • 1808–10 , William Hickey , Memoirs of a Georgian Rake , Folio Society 1995, p. 90: Three or four strange-looking things now came close to our boat, which I understood were called ‘ catamarans ’, consisting of nothing more than two or three large trees, the trunk part only strongly lashed together, upon which sat two men nearly in a state of nature [ … ] .
  • ( obsolete ) An old kind of fireship .
  • ( twin-hulled ship or boat ) : twinhull , cat
  • ( twin-hulled ship or boat ) : multihull
  • ( twin-hulled ship or boat ) : AC45 , AC72

Coordinate terms

  • outrigger canoe

Derived terms

  • cat ( diminutive )

Related terms

Descendants.

  • → Portuguese: catamarã

Translations

  (shuāngtǐchuán)                     (katamarán),   (dígastro)     (katamaran)     (sōdōsen), (katamaran)   (ttenmok)             ,           (katamarán)       (kaṭṭumaram) (reua bai têe mee lam reua sŏng lam)       (katamarán)

From Tamil கட்டு ( kaṭṭu , “ to tie ” ) +‎ மரம் ( maram , “ tree, wood ” ) .

  • IPA ( key ) : /ka.ta.ma.ʁɑ̃/
Audio: ( )
Audio ( ): ( )
  • Homophone : catamarans

catamaran   m ( plural catamarans )

  • catamaran , a twinhulled ship or boat

Further reading

  • “ catamaran ”, in Trésor de la langue française informatisé [ Digitized Treasury of the French Language ] , 2012 .

Borrowed from English catamaran , from Tamil .

  • ( Jersey ) catamaran

Borrowed from French catamaran .

catamaran   n ( plural catamarane )

singular plural
indefinite articulation definite articulation indefinite articulation definite articulation
nominative/accusative (un) (niște)
genitive/dative (unui) (unor)
vocative

meaning of catamaran in english

  • English terms borrowed from Tamil
  • English terms derived from Tamil
  • English 4-syllable words
  • English terms with IPA pronunciation
  • English terms with audio links
  • English lemmas
  • English nouns
  • English countable nouns
  • English terms with quotations
  • English colloquialisms
  • English terms with rare senses
  • English terms with obsolete senses
  • en:Watercraft
  • French terms derived from Tamil
  • French 4-syllable words
  • French terms with IPA pronunciation
  • French terms with audio links
  • French terms with homophones
  • French lemmas
  • French nouns
  • French countable nouns
  • French masculine nouns
  • fr:Watercraft
  • Norman terms borrowed from English
  • Norman terms derived from English
  • Norman terms derived from Tamil
  • Norman lemmas
  • Norman nouns
  • Norman masculine nouns
  • Jersey Norman
  • nrf:Watercraft
  • Romanian terms borrowed from French
  • Romanian terms derived from French
  • Romanian lemmas
  • Romanian nouns
  • Romanian countable nouns
  • Romanian neuter nouns
  • English entries with topic categories using raw markup
  • Terms with Basque translations
  • Terms with Catalan translations
  • Mandarin terms with redundant transliterations
  • Terms with Mandarin translations
  • Terms with Czech translations
  • Terms with Danish translations
  • Terms with Faroese translations
  • Terms with Finnish translations
  • Terms with French translations
  • Terms with German translations
  • Terms with Greek translations
  • Terms with Hebrew translations
  • Terms with Italian translations
  • Japanese terms with redundant script codes
  • Terms with Japanese translations
  • Terms with Korean translations
  • Terms with Manx translations
  • Terms with Norman translations
  • Terms with Norwegian Bokmål translations
  • Terms with Norwegian Nynorsk translations
  • Terms with Occitan translations
  • Terms with Polish translations
  • Terms with Portuguese translations
  • Terms with Russian translations
  • Terms with Spanish translations
  • Terms with Tamil translations
  • Terms with Thai translations
  • Terms with Turkish translations
  • Terms with Ukrainian translations

Navigation menu

|
| | | | | |
My Wordlists
Legacy activities
 
 
  Wordsmyth
 
 
Standard
 
a boat, usu. a sailboat, with parallel twin hulls.
Subscriber feature
See
 
 
Subscribe for ad-free
Wordsmyth and more

Maritime Page

What Are Catamarans And Their History?

Catamarans are boats with two connected hulls that are joined by a bridge. Because they are faster, more stable, and capable of carrying larger cargo than their monohull counterparts, catamarans are growing in popularity.

As a result, designers and owners have greater freedom to accommodate space needs in terms of size and usefulness than they would with single-hulled vessels.

The name catamaran came from the Tamil word “kattumaram” which basically meant “logs which were bound together”. These traditional watercraft were basically used on the south coast of India and Srilanka. They were dated back to as early as the 5th century when they were used to transport troops from one island to another.

Let us get into more details to learn more about the different types of catamarans and their functions.

Sailing catamaran in harbor

What are the different types of catamarans?

Catamarans are mainly divided into two categories: sailing and power catamarans, however, both categories can be split into smaller groups by their size and use.

Sailing catamarans

These types of catamarans are mainly propelled with help of sails. The sails act as wings with which the vessel moves forward with the help of wind energy. The sailing catamarans have advanced significantly in recent years in terms of both design and performance attributes. Sailing catamarans are further subdivided based on their dimensions and functions and are classified into,

Small, mini, or sports catamarans

Depending on the size, these are also known as leisure catamarans and can carry a load of 6 persons on average. You’ve definitely seen some of them speeding through your local beach waters on hot, sunny weekends; some of them are made to be driven by one person. Those designed for use in sports have a trapeze that enables one to hike out and serve as a counterweight.

Small-day sailing cats are well-liked because they offer a secure and straightforward learning environment, and you can see fleets of them in resorts where guests with little to no sailing experience utilize them. These little cats are often made of roto-molded plastic or fiberglass, and as they frequently lack auxiliary motors, sails are their only means of propulsion

A trampoline that spans the two hulls of the sports catamarans acts as a bridge so that individuals can move from one to the other without falling into the water. They may be launched and landed from a beach as opposed to a dock because of their modest size. They have a rotating mast and a mainsail with full-length battens.

Cruising Catamarans

In the worlds of long-distance cruising and bareboat chartering, larger cruising cats have dominated. These are more stable than their monohull competitors, allowing them to securely transport people across continents. These are more stable than their monohull competitors, allowing them to securely transport people across continents.

For maneuverability, charter cats frequently have two engines—one in each hull—as well as a mast that holds a mainsail and at least one headsail.

Nowadays, cruising catamarans are more widely available than monohulls at bareboat charter firms with tropical bases, and those numbers are rising in places like the Mediterranean.

Power catamarans

Power catamarans, often known as “multi-hull powerboats” or “power cats,” are vessels without masts or sails but with larger and more powerful engines. They can be the most perfect choice for your first boat if you enjoy offshore fishing or other water sports. You get a great balance of performance, stability, and maneuverability with these powerboats. Power cats come in a range of different sizes and shapes. In terms of dimensions and functions, they are also divided into,

Center console fishing catamarans

The fishing industry is flooded with smaller power cat brands, while bareboat charter and cruise platforms are seeing the emergence of larger ones. The multi-hull performance boat frequently has a center console driver layout.  They can reach higher top speeds thanks to their higher horsepower, but these cats also need to be strengthened hulls to support the weight and power of these engines.

When used for fishing, normally lesser than 50 ft, there are several options available for live wells, rod holders, gear storage, and built-in coolers for both fish and beverages. Depending on the length and design elements of the boat, certain consoles may locate closer to the bow or aft of the vessel.

Offshore powerboat racing catamarans

Offshore powerboat racing is the aquatic equivalent of off-road auto racing. Since its inception in the late 1960s, offshore racing has changed drastically.

Though V-bottom powerboat classes still exist, twin-engine catamarans with top speeds of 170 MPH in the most powerful classes dominate the sport.

The offshore race course may be the most dynamic setting in all of the motorsports because of the constant fluctuations in a swell, wind, tide, current, and other factors. The track might abruptly change from being friendly to antagonistic.

These boats are designed and built such that they are both lightweight but extremely strong using the most advanced materials like carbon fiber and Kevlar . Manufacturing methods such as infusion are adopted to make sure the properties of the materials are not lost during the production stages.

Motor yachts and ferries

For their roominess and speed, catamaran designs have also become popular among motor yachts and commercial passenger ferries. These cruise-centric yachts offer homelike livability for avid travelers, are fuel efficient, and are fairly intuitive to run.

Motor yacht catamarans have been designed with larger living spaces in mind, as well as more outdoor recreation places. The huge fly bridges provide additional space for relaxing and socializing, and electric boat davits make lifting the dinghy simple. Daily tasks like cooking can be done with ease because catamarans don’t heel.

Why Is There A Shift In Trend From Monohulls To Catamarans?

Recently, more and more often you can find catamarans in the harbors of large cities and small resorts. It can be unequivocally argued that catamarans are gaining popularity among both beginners and experienced sailors and even celebrities. But what makes them gain this popularity?

Catamarans In Terms Of Function And Utility

The enormous interior space expansion can provide the owners considerably more freedom to select furnishings without regard to size limits and more room for additional appliances like washers and dryers, which can make life on board much easier.

Due to their broader decks and roomier interiors, catamarans are frequently employed as party boats. The deck can accommodate more people without giving them the impression of being crammed into a small space.

In terms of storage, catamarans offer more alternatives than monohulls because both hulls can serve a variety of purposes, increasing the vessel’s overall capacity as well.

Catamarans are typically utilized as party boats since they have bigger deck spaces and greater room for movement. The deck can also accommodate more people without giving them the impression of being confined in a small space.

If any equipment breaks down, there is always a backup. For instance, if one of the engines on the port hull fails, we can always use the starboard engine to re-enter landfall. Likewise, if a generator breaks down, there is always a second generator that can be utilized as a backup.

Catamarans In Terms Of Performance And Stability

Due to the narrow hulls of catamarans, which serve to reduce drag forces, they frequently outperform monohulls. On performance power catamarans, the area in between the two hulls known as the “Tunnel” is built in a similar way to an aerofoil so that it behaves like a wing, boosting the aerodynamic lift forces and enhancing the overall effectiveness and top-end speeds of the craft.

Due to their stronger lift forces and lower water friction than monohulls, catamarans typically have a better fuel economy. This is because the strain placed on the engines as a whole is reduced, resulting in less fuel being used.

In terms of roll stability, catamarans are often more stable than monohulls. This offers them an advantage in terms of comfort and the ability to carry out various activities onboard the vessel with ease, as well as lowering the possibility of passengers falling on board. Because they are less likely to make passengers seasick, catamarans are typically used as ferries or passenger ships.

Catamarans provide a more comfortable ride whether they are in shallow water, deep water, or at anchor; they have a decreased chance of keeling over or capsizing in heavy winds.

Also, catamarans have a much lower draft when compared to their mono hull counterpart’s allowing them to easily ply over shallower waters.

What Are The Potential Drawbacks Of Catamarans?

Catamarans have a few minor limitations, much like any other kind of boat:

Finding dock space is frequently challenging and expensive for catamarans because they take up more room.

Power and sailing cats can both smash into the bridge deck when heading to the weather because of the way that they are built.

Additionally, because they have two hulls instead of one, sailing cats can’t necessarily aim as high into the wind as monohulls can.

Overall, a catamaran allows for greater speeds, but at the expense of much-reduced vessel control. Knowing when to accelerate and when to slow down is difficult when sailing a catamaran. A catamaran can be readily overturned in sea conditions that a monohull can maneuver securely in.

Finally, while it may be alluring to add more weight in a catamaran due to the space it provides, doing so will almost certainly degrade the performance of either power or sailing cat—something that is less of an issue on their monohull counterparts.

Catamarans are a growing trend due to their better advantages over their monohull counterparts. Despite having an ancient fundamental design, catamarans are a modern boating alternative that can be used by any boater for both commercial and leisure uses.

About the author

' src=

I worked as an officer in the deck department on various types of vessels, including oil and chemical tankers, LPG carriers, and even reefer and TSHD in the early years. Currently employed as Marine Surveyor carrying cargo, draft, bunker, and warranty survey.

Leave a Reply Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

Latest posts

What Happens if a Ship Loses Power?

What Happens if a Ship Loses Power?

A power outage is among the worst issues for maritime professionals. What happens if a ship loses power?

How Does Marine Fleet Management Work?

How Does Marine Fleet Management Work?

This guide discusses how marine fleet management works and the benefits and features of the ultimate marine fleet management solution.

Boat Cleaning 101: How Are Ships Cleaned?

Boat Cleaning 101: How Are Ships Cleaned?

Boat cleaning is an underrated part of maintaining a water vessel. The process and general cleaning practices can change depending on the vessel type.

Words and phrases

Personal account.

  • Access or purchase personal subscriptions
  • Get our newsletter
  • Save searches
  • Set display preferences

Institutional access

Sign in with library card

Sign in with username / password

Recommend to your librarian

Institutional account management

Sign in as administrator on Oxford Academic

catamaran noun

  • Hide all quotations

What does the noun catamaran mean?

There are four meanings listed in OED's entry for the noun catamaran , one of which is labelled obsolete. See ‘Meaning & use’ for definitions, usage, and quotation evidence.

catamaran has developed meanings and uses in subjects including

Entry status

OED is undergoing a continuous programme of revision to modernize and improve definitions. This entry has not yet been fully revised.

How common is the noun catamaran ?

How is the noun catamaran pronounced?

British english, u.s. english, where does the noun catamaran come from.

Earliest known use

The earliest known use of the noun catamaran is in the late 1600s.

OED's earliest evidence for catamaran is from 1697, in the writing of William Dampier, buccaneer and explorer.

catamaran is a borrowing from Tamil.

Etymons: Tamil kaṭṭa-maram .

Nearby entries

  • catalysis, n. 1655–
  • catalysor, n. 1901–
  • catalysotype, n. 1853–
  • catalyst, n. 1902–
  • catalytic, adj. & n. 1836–
  • catalytical, adj. 1889–
  • catalytically, adv. 1845–
  • catalytic converter, n. 1955–
  • catalytic cracker, n. 1951–
  • catalytic cracking, n. 1927–
  • catamaran, n. 1697–
  • catamaran, v. 1820–
  • catamenia, n. 1764–
  • catamenial, adj. 1851–
  • catamidiate, v. 1656
  • catamite, n. ?1552–
  • catamited, adj. 1697
  • catamiting, adj. a1641–
  • catamount, n. 1664–
  • catamountain | cat o' mountain, n. ?a1475–
  • catanadromous, adj. 1753

Thank you for visiting Oxford English Dictionary

To continue reading, please sign in below or purchase a subscription. After purchasing, please sign in below to access the content.

Meaning & use

Pronunciation, compounds & derived words, entry history for catamaran, n..

catamaran, n. was first published in 1889; not yet revised.

catamaran, n. was last modified in July 2023.

Revision of the OED is a long-term project. Entries in oed.com which have not been revised may include:

  • corrections and revisions to definitions, pronunciation, etymology, headwords, variant spellings, quotations, and dates;
  • new senses, phrases, and quotations which have been added in subsequent print and online updates.

Revisions and additions of this kind were last incorporated into catamaran, n. in July 2023.

Earlier versions of this entry were published in:

OED First Edition (1889)

  • Find out more

OED Second Edition (1989)

  • View catamaran in OED Second Edition

Please submit your feedback for catamaran, n.

Please include your email address if you are happy to be contacted about your feedback. OUP will not use this email address for any other purpose.

Citation details

Factsheet for catamaran, n., browse entry.

meaning of catamaran in english

What Is A Catamaran? Does It Have Engines Or Can It Only Sail?

meaning of catamaran in english

Catamarans are a type of boat that has two hulls connected by a platform. They offer many advantages over traditional monohull boats, including increased stability and improved speed. This article will explore what exactly catamarans are and how they can be powered. We’ll also look at the differences between sailing and motor-powered catamarans to help you decide which one is right for you.

What Is A Catamaran?

A catamaran is a type of boat with two hulls connected by beams. It is usually powered by sails, although all modern catamarans come with inboard motors for propulsion. Catamarans are traditionally used for sailing, fishing, and leisure activities . They can be used in both fresh and salt water, and their light weight allows them to travel at high speeds without using much fuel.

Catamarans are known for their stability and durability due to their wide beam and shallow draft. This makes them ideal for traversing shallow waters or areas where the sea is choppy and unpredictable. They also have the advantage of being able to turn quickly and maneuver easily in tight spaces. Additionally, they provide a smooth ride despite rough seas since the two hulls help to reduce wave impact on the boat itself.

Advantages Of Catamarans

Catamarans offer many advantages to sailors and other seafaring travelers. The primary benefit of catamarans is their stability, due to the fact that they have two hulls that are connected by a platform. This design makes them much more resistant to waves than monohull vessels, which makes them ideal for activities such as fishing or leisurely cruises near shore. Catamarans also tend to be lighter, faster and more fuel efficient than monohulls, making them an attractive choice for sportier outings such as racing or overnight trips. In addition, catamarans can either be powered by engines or sails, giving you the flexibility to choose whatever type of propulsion suits your needs best.

Types Of Catamarans

Catamarans come in a variety of shapes and sizes, from luxurious yachts to fast-moving racing boats. They offer a unique sailing experience, with their twin hulls providing stability and comfort while still able to reach high speeds. Catamarans can be powered by engines or sail, enabling them to move swiftly through the water. Some are designed for serious racing, while others are equipped for leisurely cruising on the open waters. With so many options available, there is sure to be a catamaran that will fit any sailor’s needs. Whether it’s speed or comfort that you’re after, a catamaran can provide an unforgettable experience on the seas.

Sailing Vs. Motor-Powered Catamarans

Catamarans offer many advantages over monohulls and have become a popular choice for many reasons.. They are lightweight, stable, and provide ample space onboard. However, there is one major decision to make when purchasing a catamaran: whether to choose a sailing or motor-powered version.

Sailing catamarans have the traditional look of a boat with two hulls and tall sails, while motor-powered catamarans come equipped with engines and resemble more of a powerboat. Both types of catamarans offer their own unique benefits and drawbacks. Sailing versions are cheaper to purchase but require the sailor to be knowledgeable in sailing tactics in order to navigate easily. Motor-powered versions are more expensive but can be easier to operate in certain conditions due to their greater speed and maneuverability. In the end, it comes down to personal preference as both types can provide an enjoyable experience on the water.

Benefits Of Chartering A Catamaran

Catamarans are a type of sailing vessel with two hulls that are connected with a frame. They are typically very stable and have plenty of deck space for passengers and amenities. Catamarans also come equipped with two engines, so they can travel in calm waters even when there’s no wind to power the sails. The engine also allows them to get back quickly against strong winds or tides, making them great for long trips and passages.

The major benefit of chartering a catamaran is the amount of space it provides compared to traditional monohulls (a boat with one hull). This makes them ideal for larger groups, as they can accommodate more people without feeling cramped. Additionally, catamarans offer great stability in the water – even in choppy conditions – allowing you to feel safe and secure while onboard. Plus, since they don’t require as much maintenance as other boats, they’re perfect for longer periods of time on the water. All these factors make catamarans a great choice for any travel vacation with friends and family.

Frequently Asked Questions

Are catamarans suitable for excursions.

Catamarans are a popular choice for those looking to charter one for an excursion due to their spaciousness and stability. They provide more than enough room for comfortable traveling as well as plenty of storage space, making them an ideal option for extended cruising. Additionally, all catamarans are equipped with engines, allowing for easy navigation and maneuverability when needed. All in all, catamarans make great vessels for vacations and traveling and can be a great way to explore the waters.

What Is The Best Type Of Catamaran For Ocean Voyaging?

When it comes to ocean voyaging, the best type of catamaran is a modern performance cruiser. These vessels are designed to combine speed and comfort, with a shallow draft for navigating in and out of shallow waters. Modern performance cruising catamarans feature two hulls connected by an open deck, often with engines that give them greater maneuverability. They also generally have larger living spaces than traditional monohulls, so they can provide more comfortable accommodations during long voyages.

How Many People Can Typically Fit On A Catamaran?

A catamaran is a type of boat with two parallel hulls. Depending on the size, it can typically fit anywhere from 4-12 people plus crew. It’s important to note that the number of passengers will depend on the size and design of the boat, so it’s best to check with a manufacturer for more specific details.

A catamaran is a great choice for those looking to explore the ocean in style. They’re spacious and versatile, making them suitable for all sorts of travel plans and excursions. Plus, they can be powered by either engines and/or sails, so you can decide which works best for your needs. Charter prices can vary depending on your vacation needs. All in all, a catamaran is an excellent choice for anyone wanting to explore the open seas!

If you’re considering renting a catamaran, it’s important to do some research first. There are many different kinds to choose from depending on what your entire party has on their travel wish list – and make sure that you have a safe and fun voyage!

Get a Quote

Are you ready to let us show you what we can do for you? We can’t wait! This is as exciting for us as it is for you. We began this business because we love putting the perfect yacht charter together for our clients and getting the best of the best at the right price point thanks to our contacts and experience. 

Use our quick contact form to give us the basics about what you’re looking for and we’ll send you ideas and pricing. Don’t worry if it’s not grand enough or should be scaled back; we’ll take care of that too. When you love the plan, we put it into action. All you have to do is show up and enjoy.

More Vacation Tips

Best Beaches in Grenada

The Best Beaches in Grenada for Yacht Charter Guests

Bahamas Is a Top Yacht Charter Destination

Why the Bahamas Is a Top Yacht Charter Destination

BVI sailing

Sailing the BVI: A Perfect Week-Long Itinerary

Boat Pursuits Logo

Where Did Catamaran Originate? (A Look Into Its History)

meaning of catamaran in english

Catamarans have been around for centuries, but where did they come from? For those who are curious about the history and origins of catamarans, this article will explore the history of catamaran, from its beginnings to its current uses.

From the meaning of the word “catamaran” to its use in racing and cruising, this article will look into the history of catamarans and how it has shaped the sport today.

We will also look at how catamarans have been used for fishing, and how they are still used for this purpose today.

Finally, we will explore the ways in which catamarans are used for racing and cruising, and the ways in which they have become popular vessels for these activities.

Join us as we explore the fascinating history of catamarans!

Table of Contents

Short Answer

Catamarans are thought to have originated in the South Pacific region, likely in the islands of Polynesia.

The earliest catamarans are believed to have been constructed by the Austronesians around 1500 to 1000 BC.

These vessels were then spread to other cultures by trading and other means of communication.

Today, catamarans are used in various ways around the world, including for commercial and recreational purposes.

The Origins of Catamaran

Catamarans have a long and rich history that dates back to the Indian subcontinent.

The word catamaran is derived from the Tamil language of South India and literally means tied wood, referring to how two logs were tied together to form the original catamaran design.

This sturdy craft was originally used for transportation and fishing, but it eventually made its way to the West in the late 18th century as a recreational sailing vessel.

Today, catamarans are used for a variety of purposes, ranging from racing and cruising to fishing.

They are renowned for their stability, maneuverability, and speed, and they are popular with both recreational and professional sailors alike.

Catamarans are especially adept at handling choppy waters, as their design allows them to handle waves better than most other vessels.

This makes them an ideal choice for sailing in rough or windy conditions.

Catamarans are also praised for their spacious layout, with their two hulls providing more room than other types of vessels.

This makes them ideal for larger groups, as they can comfortably accommodate more people than a traditional sailboat.

Additionally, catamarans are renowned for their efficiency, as their design allows them to move through the water faster and more efficiently than other boats.

Overall, catamarans have come a long way from their humble origins in the Indian subcontinent.

Today, they are a versatile and popular choice for sailing enthusiasts of all levels, and their history is a testament to their durability and longevity.

The Meaning of the Word Catamaran

meaning of catamaran in english

The word catamaran is derived from the Tamil language of South India, where it literally means “tied wood”.

This refers to the traditional design of catamarans, which typically consists of two logs or planks of wood tied together with rope.

The original catamarans were used for transportation and fishing, and their widespread use in the Indian subcontinent has been documented since at least the 3rd century BCE.

Today, the term catamaran is often used to describe a wide range of multi-hulled vessels, from recreational sailing vessels to racing boats and even commercial vessels.

While all of these vessels share the same basic design, the modern catamaran has evolved over the centuries and now includes variations such as trimarans, trimarans, and even pontoon boats.

The development of the modern catamaran began in the late 18th century, when the first catamarans appeared in the West.

These vessels were developed for recreational sailing, and over time they have become increasingly popular for use in racing, cruising, and fishing.

Catamarans are well known for their stability and speed, and they are now used in a variety of applications, from leisure sailing to commercial shipping.

Ultimately, the word catamaran is derived from the Tamil language and it literally means “tied wood”.

Over the centuries, the catamaran has evolved and today it is used for everything from racing to cruising to fishing, and is renowned for its stability and speed.

Catamarans in the West

The first recorded appearance of catamarans in the Western world dates back to the late 18th century.

At the time, the vessels were brought to the Caribbean from the Indian subcontinent by traders and explorers.

They were quickly adopted by sailors for their speed and stability, as well as their ability to navigate shallow waters.

Catamarans were also popular among fishermen, as they could carry more cargo and could easily navigate shallow waters.

The vessels quickly spread across the globe, with catamarans becoming a popular recreational sailing vessel in the 19th century.

The vessels were a common sight in the Caribbean, and they eventually spread to other parts of the world, including the United States and Europe.

By the mid-20th century, catamarans had become a popular recreational sailing vessel, with many people using them for racing, cruising, and fishing.

Today, catamarans are used for a wide variety of activities, from recreational sailing to fishing and racing.

They are renowned for their stability and speed, and they are still popular among recreational sailors of all skill levels.

Catamarans continue to be used for transportation and fishing in the Indian subcontinent, where they originated, and they are still a popular sight in many parts of the world.

Uses of Catamarans

meaning of catamaran in english

Catamarans have long been used for transportation and fishing in the Indian subcontinent, where the word “catamaran” originates from the Tamil language, meaning “tied wood.” This origin refers to the traditional design of tying two logs together to form the original catamaran.

Today, catamarans are used for a variety of purposes, from recreational sailing to racing, cruising, and fishing.

Catamarans are renowned for their stability and speed, making them ideal for traversing large bodies of water quickly.

They provide a stable platform for activities, such as fishing and diving, and offer increased living space when compared to conventional sailboats.

The increased stability of a catamaran also makes them ideal for use in areas with high winds and choppy waters, as they can handle the conditions better than traditional sailboats.

In addition to transportation and fishing, catamarans are also used for a variety of recreational activities.

They are popular among sailors due to their speed and maneuverability, and can be used for racing, cruising, and day-sailing.

Catamarans are also popular among families and large groups, as they provide ample space for socializing and relaxing.

Catamarans have come a long way since their humble beginnings in the Indian subcontinent, and are now an integral part of the sailing world.

With their stability, speed, and ample living space, catamarans are a great choice for both recreational and commercial use.

Racing with Catamarans

Catamarans have become a popular choice for racing enthusiasts all over the world.

This is due to their remarkable stability and speed, which make them ideal for competitive sailing.

Catamarans are able to cut through the water more efficiently than traditional sailing vessels, and their light weight makes them easier to maneuver.

In addition, their dual-hulls provide more surface area, allowing them to catch more wind and push through the water faster.

This makes them perfect for racing, as they can easily navigate tight turns and sail upwind faster than any other type of boat.

Catamarans are also well-suited for long-distance sailing, as they typically have more space than traditional vessels.

This extra space allows for more storage and greater comfort, making it easier for a crew to stay out on the water for longer periods of time.

Catamarans also have a relatively flat bottom, which reduces drag and helps make them faster than traditional boats.

Today, catamarans are used in a variety of sailing competitions, including the Americas Cup and the Volvo Ocean Race.

These races typically involve multiple catamarans, making them exciting spectacles to watch.

Catamarans have also become popular in recreational sailing, and many people use them for pleasure cruises and fishing trips.

No matter how it’s used, the catamaran has become an icon in the sailing world.

Its unique advantages have made it a favorite of both racers and recreational sailors alike, and its history makes it an interesting topic to explore.

Cruising with Catamarans

meaning of catamaran in english

Catamarans are well-known for their stability and speed, making them a popular choice for recreational sailing.

Whether youre looking for a day of leisurely sailing or a thrilling race, catamarans offer an enjoyable experience that can be tailored to your individual needs.

Catamarans are especially suited to cruising, as they offer plenty of space for passengers and cargo, and their hulls dont require much maintenance.

Catamarans have a unique design that allows them to cruise efficiently and smoothly.

Their two hulls make them more stable than other boats, and their flat decks provide plenty of room for passengers to move around.

The spacious cabins provide plenty of space for sleeping, dining, and relaxing, and the cockpit is designed to make sailing easy and enjoyable.

Catamarans are also known for their speed and agility.

Their hulls are designed to cut through the water with minimal resistance, allowing them to reach speeds of up to 20 knots.

Their shallow draft also makes them ideal for shallow waters, allowing you to explore more areas than with a traditional monohull boat.

In addition to their speed and stability, catamarans are also known for their safety.

Their wide beam makes them less likely to capsize, and their two hulls help to spread the load, making them less susceptible to sinking than other vessels.

Catamarans also have a lower center of gravity, making them less likely to tip over in rough seas.

Whether youre looking for a leisurely day of sailing or a thrilling race, catamarans are an excellent choice for cruising.

With their stability, speed, and safety, they offer an enjoyable and accessible way to explore the open waters.

Fishing with Catamarans

The use of catamarans for fishing is nothing new, with the vessels first being used for the purpose in the Indian subcontinent thousands of years ago.

In the Tamil language of South India, the word catamaran comes from two words that literally mean tied wood, referring to how two logs were tied together to form the original catamaran design.

It was these vessels that were used for fishing, with two logs forming the base for the frame and a platform built on top for the fishermen to stand on.

These catamarans were incredibly versatile vessels, allowing fishermen to access shallow waters and maneuver quickly and easily to chase schools of fish.

They were also incredibly stable, and could carry a large amount of equipment and supplies, which made them ideal for long-distance fishing trips.

Today, modern catamarans are still used for fishing, with the vessels’ stable and maneuverable design still providing an ideal platform for fishermen.

Modern catamarans are made from a variety of materials, including fiberglass and aluminum, and are available in a range of sizes to suit different needs.

Catamarans are also popular for recreational fishing, with the vessels providing a great platform for anglers to enjoy their sport.

The popularity of catamarans for fishing is a testament to the versatility and effectiveness of these vessels.

With their stable and maneuverable design, their ability to access shallow waters, and their capacity to carry a large amount of equipment and supplies, they remain a popular choice for those looking to take to the water in pursuit of their catch.

Final Thoughts

Catamarans have come a long way since their humble beginnings in the Indian subcontinent.

From their simple design of two logs tied together, to today’s modern catamarans used for racing, cruising, and fishing, it’s amazing to think about all the ways these vessels have evolved.

Now that you know the history behind the word catamaran, why not take a sail and experience the thrill of these incredible vessels for yourself?

James Frami

At the age of 15, he and four other friends from his neighborhood constructed their first boat. He has been sailing for almost 30 years and has a wealth of knowledge that he wants to share with others.

Recent Posts

When Was Banana Boat Song Released? (HISTORICAL INSIGHTS)

The "Banana Boat Song" was released in 1956 by Harry Belafonte. This calypso-style song, also known as "Day-O," became a huge hit and remains popular to this day for its catchy tune and upbeat...

How to Make Banana Boat Smoothie King? (DELICIOUS RECIPE REVEALED)

To make a Banana Boat Smoothie King smoothie at home, start by gathering the ingredients: a ripe banana, peanut butter, chocolate protein powder, almond milk, and ice. Blend the banana, a scoop of...

meaning of catamaran in english

Meaning of "catamaran" in the English dictionary

Etymology of the word catamaran, pronunciation of catamaran, grammatical category of catamaran, what does catamaran mean in english.

catamaran

Definition of catamaran in the English dictionary

The first definition of catamaran in the dictionary is a sailing, or sometimes motored, vessel with twin hulls held parallel by a rigid framework. Other definition of catamaran is a primitive raft made of logs lashed together. Catamaran is also a quarrelsome woman.

WORDS THAT RHYME WITH CATAMARAN

Words that begin like catamaran, words that end like catamaran, synonyms and antonyms of catamaran in the english dictionary of synonyms, words relating to «catamaran», translation of «catamaran» into 25 languages.

online translator

TRANSLATION OF CATAMARAN

Translator english - chinese, translator english - spanish, translator english - hindi, translator english - arabic, translator english - russian, translator english - portuguese, translator english - bengali, translator english - french, translator english - malay, translator english - german, translator english - japanese, translator english - korean, translator english - javanese, translator english - vietnamese, translator english - tamil, translator english - marathi, translator english - turkish, translator english - italian, translator english - polish, translator english - ukrainian, translator english - romanian, translator english - greek, translator english - afrikaans, translator english - swedish, translator english - norwegian, trends of use of catamaran, tendencies of use of the term «catamaran».

Trends

FREQUENCY OF USE OF THE TERM «CATAMARAN» OVER TIME

Examples of use in the english literature, quotes and news about catamaran, 10 english books relating to «catamaran», 10 news items which include the term «catamaran».

  • Dictionary entries
  • Quote, rate & share
 
  • Meaning of catamaran

catamaran ( English)

Origin & history, pronunciation.

  • ( Canada , US ) IPA: /ˈkætəmɚˌæn/
  • ( Brit. Eng. ) IPA: /ˈkæt.ə.mə.ɹæn/
  • A twin - hulled ship or boat .
  • ( colloquial , rare , obsolete ) A quarrelsome woman ; a scold .
  • 1889 , William Makepeace Thackeray, Hobson's Choice : " She meddles with my prescriptions for your wife; she doctors the infant in private: you'll never have a quiet house or a quiet wife as long as that old Catamaran is here. "
  • twin-hulled ship or boat : twinhull
  • twin-hulled ship or boat : multihull
  • twin-hulled ship or boat : AC45 , AC72

Coordinate terms

  • outrigger canoe

▾  Derived words & phrases

  • cat ( diminutive )

catamaran ( French)

  • IPA: /ka.ta.ma.ʁɑ̃/
  • Homophones: catamarans
  • see catamaran (English) , a twin-hulled ship or boat

catamaran ( Norman)

  • ( Jersey ) see catamaran (English)

Automatically generated practical examples in English:

Three people have died and two are in hospital after a catamaran overturned off the Newcastle coast, with the rescue operation hampered by rough conditions. World News SBS, 11 July 2019

A British catamaran capsized on the River Hudson earlier today ahead a dramatic race in front of thousands of fans at the New York SailGP. Mail Online, 22 June 2019

Three people have died and two have been rescued after a catamaran overturned off the coast of Newcastle this morning. news.com.au, 11 July 2019

▾  Further examples

SailGP team trained on American waters for the first time Monday after launching its new-look F50 foiling catamaran on San Francisco Bay in advance of the fledgling global league's second regatta. The Washington Times, 23 April 2019

Authorities in Puerto Rico on Wednesday identified a couple they say died when their catamaran caught on fire at a marina in the island’s southwest region. The Washington Times, 2 January 2020

Samuel Martel and Guy Sherro's two man catamaran capsized six kilometres off the Brisbane coast in rough waters on Tuesday evening. Mail Online, 3 June 2020

Mauro Morandi, 81, has lived on Budelli near Sardinia since his catamaran broke down in 1989 He has lived alone on an Italian paradise island for over three decades and intimately knows its ecosystem. The Guardian, 15 July 2020

Sarm Heslop, 41, a former air hostess for Flybe airline, vanished in the dead of night from 44-year-old Ryan Bane's 47ft catamaran Siren Song in the US Virgin Islands two weeks ago. Mail Online, 22 March 2021

Yachting enthusiasts entered a bidding war in a rare opportunity to purchase a custom catamaran built for the 34th America’s Cup in San Francisco, reflecting today’s fast-moving, record-breaking yachting market. Breaking Travel News, 23 September 2021

British police are assisting in the investigation into the disappearance of a 41-year-old woman who went missing from a catamaran in the US Virgin Islands more than three weeks ago. Independent.ie, 2 April 2021

▾  Dictionary entries

Entries where "catamaran" occurs:

katamaran : see also Katamaran‎ katamaran (Czech) Pronunciation IPA: [ˈkatamaɾan] Noun katamaran (masc.) (shipping) catamaran katamaran (Polish) Pronunciation IPA: [kataˈmaɾan] Noun katamaran (masc.) (inanimate) (shipping) catamaran katamaran (Turkish) Origin…

catamarans : catamarans (English) Noun catamarans Plural of catamaran catamarans (French) Pronunciation IPA: /ka.ta.ma.ʁɑ̃/ Homophones: catamaran Noun catamarans (masc.) Plural of catamaran

cat : …débecter‎, débequeter‎ Polish: wymiotować‎ Portuguese: vomitar‎ Origin & history II Abbreviation of catamaran . Noun cat (pl. cats) A catamaran. Origin & history III Abbreviation of catenate. Noun cat (pl. cats)…

trimaran : trimaran (English) Origin & history Blend of tri- and catamaran. Noun trimaran (pl. trimarans) A type of boat with three parallel hulls. Related words & phrases catamaran Translations trimaran - type of boat Catalan: trimarà‎ (masc.)…

catamarán : see also catamaran ‎ catamarán (Spanish) Noun catamarán (masc.) (pl. catamaranes) catamaran

Quote, Rate & Share

Cite this page : "catamaran" – WordSense Online Dictionary (19th June, 2024) URL: https://www.wordsense.eu/catamaran/

There are no notes for this entry.

▾  Next

catamaranes (Spanish)

catamarani (Italian)

catamarano (Italian)

catamarans (English)

catamarcaite (English)

catamarqueña (Spanish)

Pronunciation example

▾  about wordsense, ▾  references.

The references include Wikipedia, Cambridge Dictionary Online, Oxford English Dictionary, Webster's Dictionary 1913, Trésor de la langue française informatisé and others. Details can be found in the individual articles.

▾  License

▾  latest.

redist , bicordo , subienda

Disclaimer » Advertising

  • HealthyChildren.org

Discharge Instruction Text Selection and Translation

Evaluator recruitment, translation evaluation rubric and study procedures, statistical analysis, participant and discharge instruction characteristics, translation evaluation, strengths and limitations, conclusions, acknowledgments, performance of chatgpt and google translate for pediatric discharge instruction translation.

M Luercio and JD Hron contributed equally as co-senior authors.

FUNDING: Drs Brewster and Gonzalez received grant funding from Boston Medical Center.

CONFLICT OF INTEREST DISCLOSURES: Dr Brewster received grant funding from Boston Children’s Hospital and Boston Medical Center, all outside the submitted work; Dr Khazanchi served as a health equity consultant to the New York City Department of Hygiene and Mental Health’s Office of the Chief Medical Officer, advises the Rise to Health Coalition, serves as a commissioner on The Lancet ’s Commission on Antiracism and Solidarity, and receives grant funding from Boston Children’s Hospital and Boston Medical Center, all outside the submitted work; and the remaining authors have no conflict of interest relevant to this article to disclose.

  • Split-Screen
  • Article contents
  • Figures & tables
  • Supplementary Data
  • Peer Review
  • CME Quiz Close Quiz
  • Open the PDF for in another window
  • Get Permissions
  • Cite Icon Cite
  • Search Site

Ryan C.L. Brewster , Priscilla Gonzalez , Rohan Khazanchi , Alex Butler , Raquel Selcer , Derrick Chu , Barbara Pontes Aires , Marcella Luercio , Jonathan D. Hron; Performance of ChatGPT and Google Translate for Pediatric Discharge Instruction Translation. Pediatrics 2024; e2023065573. 10.1542/peds.2023-065573

Download citation file:

  • Ris (Zotero)
  • Reference Manager

Video Abstract

Patients who speak languages other than English face barriers to equitable healthcare delivery. Machine translation systems, including emerging large language models, have the potential to expand access to translation services, but their merits and limitations in clinical practice remain poorly defined. We aimed to assess the performance of Google Translate and ChatGPT for multilingual translation of pediatric discharge instructions.

Twenty standardized discharge instructions for pediatric conditions were translated into Spanish, Brazilian Portuguese, and Haitian Creole by professional translation services, Google Translate and ChatGPT-4.0, and evaluated for adequacy (preserved information), fluency (grammatical correctness), meaning (preserved connotation), and severity (clinical harm), along with assessment of overall preference. Domain-level ratings and preferred translation source were summarized with descriptive statistics and compared with professional translations.

Google Translate and ChatGPT demonstrated similar domain-level ratings to professional translations for Spanish and Portuguese. For Haitian Creole, compared with both Google Translate and ChatGPT, professional translations demonstrated significantly greater adequacy, fluency meaning, and severity scores. ChatGPT (33.3%, P < .001) and Google Translate (23.3%, P = .024) contained more potentially clinically significant errors (severity score ≤3) for Haitian Creole than professional translations (8.3%). Professional Haitian Creole (48.3%) and Portuguese (43.3%), but not Spanish (15%), translations were most frequently preferred among translation sources.

Machine translation platforms have comparable performance to professional translations for Spanish and Portuguese but shortcomings in quality, accuracy, and preference persist for Haitian Creole. Diverse multilingual training data are needed, along with regulations ensuring safe and equitable applications of machine translation in clinical practice.

Patients who speak languages other than English experience inequitable healthcare delivery. Machine translation, including large language models, may expand access to translation services and culturally-responsive care. The merits and limitations of these systems in clinical practice remain poorly defined.

In this study of standardized discharge instructions, ChatGPT and Google Translate were comparable to professional translations for Spanish and Portuguese. Poorer performance for Haitian Creole reflects the need for multilingual training data and regulations for safe and equitable machine translation.

Language barriers pose an important challenge in providing equitable and quality healthcare to patients who speak languages other than English (LOE), contributing to more frequent unplanned healthcare utilization, adverse patient safety events, and increased healthcare costs. 1–6 The effects of poor communication with patients who speak LOE can be magnified in written documentation. Decreased understanding of discharge instructions, which are often the last piece of information shared with patients before leaving the hospital, can lead to missed follow-up appointments or misunderstanding of medication recommendations. 2 Many institutions employ in-person or virtual interpreter services and develop standardized clinical documents in different languages. These resources are not universally available in all practice environments, however, and often only exist for a select number of languages or clinical circumstances. 7 , 8  

Advances in machine translation, which utilizes machine learning techniques to automatically translate written text into different languages, may enhance access to care for patients who speak LOE. Google Translate (GT) – one of the most popular forms of machine translation - has been explored in several clinical settings with mixed success. 9–14 The broader implementation of machine translation faces barriers caused by methodological inconsistencies in evaluation and disparities in accuracy and quality across languages with relatively smaller datasets to train translation systems, otherwise known as languages of limited diffusion. 15–17 In this context, ChatGPT and the emergence of large language models (LLMs) represents the most recent iteration of artificial intelligence-enabled technologies with significant implications for healthcare practice. The ability to generate conversational, human-like responses with contextual understanding makes translation a compelling use case for LLMs but may be subject to the same, if not greater, biases in training data and performance as existing platforms.

In accordance with Section 1557 of the Affordable Care Act and Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, health care facilities must ensure reasonable access to care for patients who speak LOE, including language translation. 18 For rapidly evolving machine translation engines to deliver on these mandates while ensuring equity, safety, and quality will require a systematic understanding of their merits and limitations. Toward this end, the primary objective of our study was to compare the accuracy and acceptability of discharge instructions generated by professional translation, GT, and ChatGPT across 3 of the most commonly spoken LOE within our health systems: Spanish, Brazilian Portuguese, and Haitian Creole.

Discharge instructions were selected from the library of standardized, patient-centered content from a major educational vendor. Materials are developed at a sixth to eighth grade literacy level and follow recommendations based on clinical practice guidelines, systematic reviews, and peer-reviewed publications. The educational library is integrated with one of our health system’s electronic medical records and is routinely used for patient and family education before discharge. We extracted 20 instructions from 16 topics that reflect common clinical diagnoses seen in urgent care, emergency, and hospital settings. Content areas included return precautions, explanations of disease processes or interventions, medication instructions, and prevention and supportive care. There were no references to individual patients. The Flesch-Kincaid readability score, a validated method for measuring the comprehensibility of text based on sentence and word length, was calculated for the original English instructions ( Supplemental Table 2 for a complete list of conditions and Flesch-Kincaid readability scores). 19  

Instructions were translated from English into Spanish, Brazilian Portuguese (henceforth referred to as “Portuguese”), and Haitian Creole using 3 modalities: professional translation, GT, and ChatGPT. Of note, the target languages were chosen because they are among the most commonly spoken non-English languages in our health systems. Professional translations were available through the educational vendor using a third-party certified medical translation service. Translations undergo a production and quality assurance process consistent with industry standards. GT was developed by Google (Mountain View, CA) and is a freely available multilingual machine translation platform with over 130 supported languages. We generated translations from English to the target languages via the web-based application on the Google homepage. 20 Launched by OpenAI in late 2022, ChatGPT is an LLM-based chat bot modeled on the generative pretrained transformer (GPT) architecture. 21 Unlike GT, which is specifically trained on a large corpora of multilingual text for the purposes of translation, ChatGPT uses general information from the internet and can generate responses for a wide variety of tasks, including translation. To date, GPT-4 is the most recent foundational model and was accessed for this study with a personal subscription. We submitted a standardized prompt to translate instructions: “Imagine you are a translator at a children’s hospital. Please translate the following information into [target language], which will be provided to patients and their families.” ChatGPT prompts were entered in July 2023. Only the first output from GPT-4 was included for evaluation to mirror potential real world applications. Altogether, the final analysis comprised 60 translations (20 per translation source) for each of the 3 target languages, for a total of 180 translations.

We recruited 8 clinician evaluators who hold credentials from their hospitals to practice as certified bilingual providers: 3 for Spanish, 2 for Haitian Creole, and 3 for Portuguese. One Haitian Creole medical interpreter was also enrolled. Providers were practicing pediatricians in an academic medical center with a mixture of inpatient and outpatient expertise. All raters were native speakers with formal education in the target language and at least professionally proficient in English. As such, they were considered appropriate evaluators of translation performance as well as the clinical consequences therein. Levels of acculturation and English fluency were assessed with an adaptation of the Short Acculturation Scale for Hispanics. 22 Evaluators received a $100 stipend for study completion, with the exception of B.P.A. and M.L., who contributed as co-authors.

Translations were rated using an evaluation rubric adapted from prior studies of machine translation platforms ( Supplemental Table 3 for a full description of the evaluation rubric). 14 , 23 The instrument includes 4 accepted domains of translation accuracy and quality along a 5-point Likert scale: adequacy, meaning, fluency, and severity. Adequacy is a measure of how much of the information present in the original text is preserved, whereas meaning evaluates the extent to which translated materials retain the original intent and connotation. Fluency captures grammar and readability. Whether potential harm was introduced with the translation was evaluated with the severity domain. A severity score ≤3 (“Delays necessary care”) was defined as clinically significant harm or delay of care. Finally, evaluators were asked to state which, if any, of the translations they preferred as a direct comparison across translation versions.

Before submitting their responses, participants reviewed a comprehensive guide describing the study and evaluation rubric. Examples of ratings for each of the domains were also provided. We blinded evaluators to the source of the translation and randomized the order of translations with a random sequence generator. The original English text of each translation was available for reference. Evaluation forms were anonymized, password-protected, and stored on REDCap. Two of the coauthors (R.B. and P.G.) addressed evaluator queries during both the training and study periods.

Participant characteristics and translation evaluations were summarized with descriptive statistics. We applied intraclass correlation coefficients as a measure of interrater reliability. In general, an intraclass correlation coefficient <0.5 is accepted as poor reliability, 0.5 to 0.75 as moderate reliability, 0.75 to 0.90 as good reliability, and anything greater than 0.9 as excellent reliability. 24 Individual rater responses were combined into a grand mean for each domain and translation source ( n = 60). 25 We compared mean Likert ratings between professional translations and each machine translation system (ie, professional versus GT and professional versus ChatGPT) with the Kruskal-Wallis H test and posthoc testing. The 2-proportions z-test was used to evaluate differences in the preference for professional translations relative to GT and ChatGPT and to compare the proportion of translations that pose potential harm (severity score ≤3) across translation sources. We tested the association of Flesch-Kincaid readability score with translation domain scores using linear mixed-effects regression models adjusted for the random effect of multiple raters. Multinomial logistic regression was performed to evaluate whether the Flesch-Kincaid score was associated with translation source preference. Statistical analyses were performed in R, version 3.5.2, with a significance threshold of P < .05. The study was deemed not human subject research by the Boston Children’s Hospital Institutional Review Board and was exempt in accordance with 45 CFR §46.

Among the 9 multilingual evaluators, most were female (77.8%) with at least professional working proficiency (100%) and >10 years of residence in the United States (66.6%) ( Table 1 ). Raters predominantly reported reading and speaking equally well in both their native language and English (77.8%), but more often think (77.8%), socialize with friends (88.9%), and communicate at home (77.8%) in their native languages.

Self-reported Characteristics of Translation Raters

Overall, (%)
Gender  
 F 7 (77.8) 
 M 2 (22.2) 
English proficiency  
 No proficiency 0 (0) 
 Elementary proficiency 0 (0) 
 Limited working proficiency 0 (0) 
 Full professional proficiency 5 (55.6) 
 Native or bilingual proficiency 3 (33.3) 
 Professional working proficiency 1 (11.1) 
Years of residence in United States  
 0–10 3 (33.3) 
 11–20 2 (22.2) 
 21+ 4 (44.4) 
In general, what language(s) do you read and speak?   
 Only English 0 (0) 
 More English than native language 1 (11.1) 
 Both equally 7 (77.8) 
 More native language than English 1 (11.1) 
 Only native language 0 (0) 
What language do you usually speak at home?   
 Only English 0 (0) 
 More English than native language 1 (11.1) 
 Both equally 1 (11.1) 
 More native language than English 4 (44.4) 
 Only native language 3 (33.3) 
In what language do you usually think?   
 Only English 0 (0) 
 More English than native language 0 (0) 
 Both equally 4 (44.4) 
 More native language than English 5 (55.6) 
 Only native language 0 (0) 
What language do you usually speak with your friends?   
 Only English 0 (0) 
 More English than native language 1 (11.1) 
 Both equally 2 (22.2) 
 More native language than English 6 (66.7) 
 Only native language 0 (0) 
Overall, (%)
Gender  
 F 7 (77.8) 
 M 2 (22.2) 
English proficiency  
 No proficiency 0 (0) 
 Elementary proficiency 0 (0) 
 Limited working proficiency 0 (0) 
 Full professional proficiency 5 (55.6) 
 Native or bilingual proficiency 3 (33.3) 
 Professional working proficiency 1 (11.1) 
Years of residence in United States  
 0–10 3 (33.3) 
 11–20 2 (22.2) 
 21+ 4 (44.4) 
In general, what language(s) do you read and speak?   
 Only English 0 (0) 
 More English than native language 1 (11.1) 
 Both equally 7 (77.8) 
 More native language than English 1 (11.1) 
 Only native language 0 (0) 
What language do you usually speak at home?   
 Only English 0 (0) 
 More English than native language 1 (11.1) 
 Both equally 1 (11.1) 
 More native language than English 4 (44.4) 
 Only native language 3 (33.3) 
In what language do you usually think?   
 Only English 0 (0) 
 More English than native language 0 (0) 
 Both equally 4 (44.4) 
 More native language than English 5 (55.6) 
 Only native language 0 (0) 
What language do you usually speak with your friends?   
 Only English 0 (0) 
 More English than native language 1 (11.1) 
 Both equally 2 (22.2) 
 More native language than English 6 (66.7) 
 Only native language 0 (0) 

Level of acculturation adapted from the Short Acculturation Scale for Hispanics.

The mean words per sentence and syllables per word for the original English instructions were 11.7 (SD 4.95) and 1.44 (0.20), respectively. This corresponded to a mean Flesch-Kincaid readability score of 73.1 (4.17), meaning most statements were considered “fairly easy to read” and at a seventh grade reading level. Three out of 20 instructions were classified as “difficult to read,” requiring at least a college-level education with a Flesch-Kincaid readability score of <50.0.

For Spanish, GT and ChatGPT scored higher than professional translations for adequacy (professional mean 4.2 [SD 0.7]; GT 4.6 [0.7], P = .003 for comparison with professional translation; ChatGPT 4.7 [0.5], P ≤ .001 for comparison with professional translation), fluency (4.2 [0.8]; 4.5 [0.7], P = .007; 4.7 [0.6], P = < .001), meaning (professional 4.4 [0.7]; GT 4.7 [0.7], P = .011; ChatGPT 4.8 [0.5], P < .001). ( Fig 1 , Supplemental Table 4 ) Professional translations (4.6 [0.7]) had lower severity ratings than ChatGPT (4.8 [0.4], P = .026), but similar to GT (4.8 [0.6], P = .164). A total of 38.3% responses preferred GT translations, followed by 31.7% for ChatGPT, and 15% for professional translations ( Fig 2 ).

Mean (with SE) domain-level ratings for professional translations, Google Translate, and ChatGPT. Asterisks (*P < .05, **P < .01, ***P < .001) correspond to Kruskal-Wallis testing with posthoc testing for significance relative to professional translations.

Mean (with SE) domain-level ratings for professional translations, Google Translate, and ChatGPT. Asterisks (* P < .05, ** P < .01, *** P < .001) correspond to Kruskal-Wallis testing with posthoc testing for significance relative to professional translations.

Proportion of responses with preference for professional translations, Google Translate and ChatGPT, by language.

Proportion of responses with preference for professional translations, Google Translate and ChatGPT, by language.

For Portuguese, only adequacy ratings were higher for ChatGPT (4.7 [0.5], P = .025) than for professional translations (4.5 [0.6]). Otherwise, there were no significant differences in fluency (professional 4.5 [0.8]; GT 4.2 [0.9]; ChatGPT 4.5 [0.8]), meaning (professional 4.5 [0.8]; GT 4.3 [0.9]; ChatGPT 4.5 [0.7]), or severity (professional 4.7 [0.7]; GT 4.5 [0.9]; ChatGPT 4.7 [0.7]) across translation sources. Professional translations were most commonly preferred (43.3%) compared with GT (15%) and ChatGPT (28.3%).

Professional translations into Haitian Creole consistently outscored those by GT and ChatGPT for adequacy (professional 4.5 [0.7]; GT 4.0 [0.8], P = .005; ChatGPT 3.9 [0.9], P  < .001), fluency (professional 3.9 [1.1]; GT 3.6 [1.1], P = .167; ChatGPT 3.4 [1.0], P = .008), meaning (professional 4.0 [0.9]; GT 3.7 [0.9], P = .028; ChatGPT 3.6 [1.0], P = .009), and severity (professional 4.5 [0.9]; GT 4 [1.2], P = .014; ChatGPT 3.8 [1.3], P < .001). Professional Haitian Creole translations were more frequently preferred (48.3%) than GT (18.3%) and ChatGPT (20.0%). The proportion of responses with a preference for professional translations was significantly greater than that of GT and ChatGPT for Haitian Creole and Portuguese ( P < .001) but not for Spanish ( P = .583).

There were discrepancies across languages in the potential for translations to result in clinical harm or delay. ( Fig 3 ). Compared with 8.3% for professional Haitian Creole translations, 23.3% ( P = .024) of GT and 33.3% ( P < .001) ChatGPT translations were reported as containing clinically meaningful errors. Conversely, the proportions of potentially harmful translations were overall lower for Spanish (professional 5%, GT 6.7%, ChatGPT 3.3%) and Portuguese (professional 6.7%, GT 16.7%, ChatGPT 5%), with no statistically significant differences across translation sources. Examples and types of machine translation errors are presented in Supplemental Table 5 .

Proportion of translations with the potential for clinically significant errors, as defined by a severity score ≤3. Asterisks (*P < .05, **P < .01, ***P < .001) correspond to the 2-proportions z-test for significance relative to professional translations.

Proportion of translations with the potential for clinically significant errors, as defined by a severity score ≤3. Asterisks (* P < .05, ** P < .01, *** P < .001) correspond to the 2-proportions z-test for significance relative to professional translations.

Flesch-Kincaid readability score was not significantly associated with nearly all domain scores ( Supplemental Table 6 ) nor with any translation source preferences ( Supplemental Table 7 ) for Haitian Creole, Spanish, or Portuguese.

The interrater reliability of translation domain ratings by intraclass correlations was moderate for Spanish (adequacy: 0.56, fluency: 0.61, meaning: 0.45, severity: 0.70), Portuguese (0.53, 0.58, 0.64, 0.59), and Haitian Creole (0.55, 0.65, 0.58, 0.69).

In this study of multilingual machine translation quality for pediatric discharge instructions, we found that both GT and ChatGPT were at least equivalent for professional Spanish and Portuguese translations across measures of adequacy, fluency, meaning, and severity. Conversely, for Haitian Creole, professional translations consistently outperformed GT and ChatGPT. Although clinicians preferred machine translation for Spanish discharge instructions, professional translations were more frequently preferred for Portuguese and Haitian Creole. Importantly, machine translation showed an increased risk of clinically significant errors for Haitian Creole translation. Both GT and ChatGPT had a low rate of clinically significant errors for Spanish and Portuguese, similar to professional translation. Sentence readability did not impact translation outcomes or preference for a particular translation source among any of the languages.

Compared with Spanish and Portuguese, our finding that Haitian Creole had less reliable performance by both GT and ChatGPT is concordant with heterogeneous multilingual outcomes observed in prior literature. For example, a study examining the efficacy of GT for emergency department discharge instructions found that Armenian had the least consistent translations of the languages analyzed. 14 Armenian is spoken by a smaller global population with less widespread internet presence. Similarly, Haitian Creole, which blends various grammatical structures, syntax, and vocabularies, has a limited digital footprint available for the development of artificial intelligence (AI) models, particularly for specialized biomedical content. 26 As ChatGPT is trained on predominantly Western and European languages, 22 the performance degradation for Haitian Creole is unsurprising.

These discrepancies suggest that machine translation should be viewed as a double-edged sword. On one hand, low cost and user-friendly platforms can enhance the delivery of culturally and linguistically concordant healthcare for patients who speak LOE for health systems without in-house translation services. Even where translators are available, machine translation could expedite turnaround times and expand the number of supported languages. 7 Additionally, healthcare providers could more effectively incorporate personalized instructions into standardized materials; many clinicians routinely customize discharge instructions with medication changes, follow-up appointments, and other patient-specific recommendations. Yet, these potential benefits must be weighed against the risk of worsening inequities. If gaps in machine translation performance persist, patients who speak LOE may be disproportionately exposed to clinical harm and poorer quality of care. Equity implications extend universally to other evolving patient-facing applications of LLMs. Several studies have demonstrated that ChatGPT can provide answers to medical questions with comparable accuracy and empathy to healthcare providers. 27 , 28 These findings have only been ascertained among English responses. Our study casts doubt that a similar capability to accurately and empathetically navigate complex conversations could be generalized to languages of limited diffusion. Here, multilingual LLMs without adequate training data or supervision may be more likely reify biases and medical misinformation. 26  

Our results underscore the need for a multidisciplinary approach to machine translation applications in health care delivery. 15 Training corpora must encompass diverse and representative language communities. Google, Meta, and Microsoft have leveraged novel machine learning techniques to augment translation outputs, even when direct data for languages of limited diffusion are not available. 29–32 Research groups globally have also curated language-specific models that may outperform larger commercial platforms. 31 , 32 It may be tempting to attribute the progressive improvements in studies of Spanish machine translation to these developments; however, meaningful benchmarking is limited by variability in study design and evaluation methodology. 11 , 23 Still, there is an opportunity for translation models to be fine-tuned with specialized knowledge and vocabulary in conjunction with ongoing efforts as AI technologies become increasingly integrated into healthcare delivery.

Defining a governance framework to support safe, equitable, and ethical machine translation will be essential. The Biden-Harris presidential administration recently introduced a sweeping Executive Order to manage the benefits and risks of AI, building on US Food and Drug Administration proposals for regulating AI-enabled medical technologies and LLMs. 33 , 34 Additionally, recommendations for the responsible use of translation systems were issued by the US Department of Health and Human Services, emphasizing the involvement of qualified human translators. 18 As these guidelines evolve, specific standards for machine translation should be developed, ideally in alignment with existing best practices for medical translation and with the input of bilingual clinicians, medical interpreters, and patients. 35 Mandates for transparency should focus on the source of training data, validation procedures, and performance across languages as it relates to translation quality and biases. 36 Healthcare institutions and regulators should agree upon content moderation policies that delineate the appropriate contexts in which machine translation should be deployed.

Study strengths include the use of real-world, evidence-based discharge instructions, comparison with professional human translations, and the incorporation of validated domains paired with evaluations of preferences and risk of harm or delay. These should be taken in the context of important limitations. Firstly, our assessment of translations relied on bilingual clinicians whose responses may not be representative of the average patient or level of health literacy. Acceptable but modest inter-rater reliability also suggests variability in how evaluators judged translation quality and accuracy. Future studies should use a multidisciplinary approach to machine translation assessment involving patients or family members, healthcare providers, and medical translators to capture the linguistic, clinical, and cultural dimensions of translations most effectively. Secondly, standardized discharge instructions do not necessarily reflect variations in the style and readability of free text content, which may further impact translation performance in real-world applications. Lastly, although certified to professional standards, we were unable to account for potential limitations with the professional translation service used as our reference group.

Our study provides key insights into the promise and limitations of using machine translation for clinical documents provided to families who speak LOE. The utility of low-cost and user-friendly translation tools is expansive and may enhance access to language-concordant care in health systems without interpreter or translation services. However, unbalanced multilingual performance raises concerns that machine translation systems may not yet be a suitable alternative to professional translation, especially for languages of limited diffusion like Haitian Creole. By extension, even favorable performance for Spanish and Portuguese should be interpreted with caution and require further validation. Amid the rapidly evolving landscape of AI in healthcare, our work reiterates the need for pragmatic patient-centered research, updates to clinical education, targeted regulatory oversight, and continuous quality improvement to ensure novel technologies are applied equitably across patient care.

We thank the Digital Innovation Network for House Officers (DINHO) of the Boston Combined Residency Program; and the translation evaluators for the time and expertise.

Dr Brewster conceptualized and designed the study, drafted the initial manuscript, coordinated and supervised data collection, conducted the data analysis, and revised the manuscript; Drs Gonzalez, Khazanchi, Butler, and Chu conceptualized and designed the study, coordinated and supervised data collection, and critically reviewed and revised the manuscript; Drs Selcer and Pontes-Aires contributed to data analysis, and reviewed and revised the manuscript; Drs Luercio and Hron conceptualized and designed the study, supervised data collection and manuscript preparation, contributed to data analysis, and critically reviewed and revised the manuscript; and all authors approved the final manuscript as submitted and agree to be accountable for all aspects of the work.

generative pretrained transformer

Google Translate

languages other than English

large language model

Competing Interests

Supplementary data.

Advertising Disclaimer »

Citing articles via

Email alerts.

meaning of catamaran in english

Affiliations

  • Editorial Board
  • Editorial Policies
  • Journal Blogs
  • Pediatrics On Call
  • Online ISSN 1098-4275
  • Print ISSN 0031-4005
  • Pediatrics Open Science
  • Hospital Pediatrics
  • Pediatrics in Review
  • AAP Grand Rounds
  • Latest News
  • Pediatric Care Online
  • Red Book Online
  • Pediatric Patient Education
  • AAP Toolkits
  • AAP Pediatric Coding Newsletter

First 1,000 Days Knowledge Center

Institutions/librarians, group practices, licensing/permissions, integrations, advertising.

  • Privacy Statement | Accessibility Statement | Terms of Use | Support Center | Contact Us
  • © Copyright American Academy of Pediatrics

This Feature Is Available To Subscribers Only

Sign In or Create an Account

  • Dictionaries home
  • American English
  • Collocations
  • German-English
  • Grammar home
  • Practical English Usage
  • Learn & Practise Grammar (Beta)
  • Word Lists home
  • My Word Lists
  • Recent additions
  • Resources home
  • Text Checker

Definition of catamaran noun from the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary

meaning of catamaran in english

Apple’s wearable devices, including the Apple Watch and AirPods, could gain hefty increases in battery life thanks to a new development in battery technology.

TDK, a major Japanese firm which has supplied batteries and other components for the iPhone, announced Monday that it has developed a material for a next-gen solid-state battery with far higher energy density than those used previously.

In a press release (via CNBC ), the company boasts that it has “successfully developed a material for CeraCharge, a next-generation solid-state battery with an energy density of 1,000 Wh/L, approximately 100 times greater than the energy density of TDK’s conventional solid-state battery.”

This technology, TDK says, is intended to be used in “various wearable devices, such as wireless earphones, hearing aids and even smartwatches, with the goal of replacing existing coin cell batteries.”

Apple has been pushing hard into the wearables space in recent years, as the company anticipates the eventual move of most computing tasks from a smartphone in the hand to smaller and lighter devices on the body. The AirPods wireless earbuds are among Apple’s most commercially successful devices, while the Apple Watch will next year celebrate its tenth anniversary and gets major stage time at the company’s events. Both devices would obviously benefit from increased battery life, with the Apple Watch in particular frequently compared unfavorably with simpler rival devices such as Fitbits which can be charged less often.

It’s important, of course, to remember how slowly such developments tend to progress, and even if Apple shows an interest in incorporating TDK’s new tech in its products they are unlikely to appear for some years. In the meantime, you can read about the new AirPods for 2024 and this fall’s Apple Watch Series 10 in separate articles.

Author: David Price , Editor

meaning of catamaran in english

David has loved the iPhone since covering the original 2007 launch; later his obsession expanded to include iPad and Apple Watch. He offers advice to owners (and prospective owners) of these devices.

Recent stories by David Price:

  • Apple’s Siri watch face finally bites the dust
  • Thin is in! Apple plans to slim down all of its products to match the iPad Pro
  • watchOS 11 brings a raft of new apps and features to the Apple Watch

IMAGES

  1. Catamaran

    meaning of catamaran in english

  2. Catamaran definition and meaning

    meaning of catamaran in english

  3. How to sail a catamaran? Read our catamaran sailing tips

    meaning of catamaran in english

  4. Catamaran Definition & Meaning

    meaning of catamaran in english

  5. What Are The Top Characteristics Of A Catamaran Hull

    meaning of catamaran in english

  6. WHAT IS A CATAMARAN?

    meaning of catamaran in english

VIDEO

  1. Standard catamaran VS electric catamaran: what are the differences?

  2. A Day in the Life Living On A Sailing Catamaran

  3. How to Pronounce catamaran

  4. Catamaran meaning in hindi

  5. ESL for Beginners

  6. We Swam with Sharks

COMMENTS

  1. CATAMARAN

    CATAMARAN definition: 1. a sailing boat that has two parallel hulls (= floating parts) held together by a single deck…. Learn more.

  2. Catamaran Definition & Meaning

    catamaran: [noun] a vessel (such as a sailboat) with twin hulls and usually a deck or superstructure connecting the hulls.

  3. Catamaran

    A catamaran ( / ˌkætəməˈræn /) (informally, a "cat") is a watercraft with two parallel hulls of equal size. The distance between a catamaran's hulls imparts resistance to rolling and overturning. Catamarans typically have less hull volume, smaller displacement, and shallower draft (draught) than monohulls of comparable length.

  4. CATAMARAN Definition & Meaning

    Catamaran definition: a vessel, usually propelled by sail, formed of two hulls or floats held side by side by a frame above them.. See examples of CATAMARAN used in a sentence.

  5. CATAMARAN

    CATAMARAN meaning: 1. a sailing boat that has two parallel hulls (= floating parts) held together by a single deck…. Learn more.

  6. Catamaran

    catamaran: 1 n a sailboat with two parallel hulls held together by single deck Type of: sailboat , sailing boat a small sailing vessel; usually with a single mast

  7. CATAMARAN definition and meaning

    3 meanings: 1. a sailing, or sometimes motored, vessel with twin hulls held parallel by a rigid framework 2. a primitive raft.... Click for more definitions.

  8. catamaran noun

    Definition of catamaran noun in Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary. Meaning, pronunciation, picture, example sentences, grammar, usage notes, synonyms and more. ... English American English. Enter search text. Definition of catamaran noun from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary.

  9. Catamaran

    Define catamaran. catamaran synonyms, catamaran pronunciation, catamaran translation, English dictionary definition of catamaran. n. 1. A boat with two parallel hulls or floats, especially a light sailboat with a mast mounted on a transverse frame joining the hulls. 2. A raft of logs...

  10. catamaran noun

    Definition of catamaran noun in Oxford Advanced American Dictionary. Meaning, pronunciation, picture, example sentences, grammar, usage notes, synonyms and more. ... Find out which words work together and produce more natural-sounding English with the Oxford Collocations Dictionary app. Try it for free as part of the Oxford Advanced Learner's ...

  11. catamaran

    From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English Related topics: Water catamaran cat‧a‧ma‧ran / ˌkætəməˈræn / noun [countable] TTW a sailing boat with two separate hull s (= the part that goes in the water) Examples from the Corpus catamaran • The ceremony took place on the beach followed by a private trip on a catamaran at sunset.

  12. CATAMARAN

    A complete guide to the word "CATAMARAN": definitions, pronunciations, synonyms, grammar insights, collocations, examples, and translations.

  13. catamaran

    catamaran (plural catamarans) A twin - hulled ship or boat . Swift over the seas the vessel drives; Madras appears in sight. The first object catching the eye, upon the anchor being cast, was an Indian upon his catamaran, who, making a sudden motion, sprung to the side of the ship, grappled there for a moment, and the next was on the deck ...

  14. Catamaran

    catamaran, twin-hulled sailing and powered boat developed for sport and recreation in the second half of the 20th century. Its design is based on a raft of two logs bridged by planks that had earlier been used by peoples in the Indonesian archipelago and throughout Polynesia and Micronesia. Early catamarans were up to 21.3 metres (70 feet) long, originally paddled by many men, and used for ...

  15. catamaran

    Definition of catamaran. English dictionary and integrated thesaurus for learners, writers, teachers, and students with advanced, intermediate, and beginner levels.

  16. What Are Catamarans And Their History?

    Sailing catamarans. These types of catamarans are mainly propelled with help of sails. The sails act as wings with which the vessel moves forward with the help of wind energy. The sailing catamarans have advanced significantly in recent years in terms of both design and performance attributes.

  17. catamaran, n. meanings, etymology and more

    There are four meanings listed in OED's entry for the noun catamaran, one of which is labelled obsolete.See 'Meaning & use' for definitions, usage, and quotation evidence.

  18. What Is A Catamaran? Does It Have Engines Or Can It Only Sail?

    Types Of Catamarans. Catamarans come in a variety of shapes and sizes, from luxurious yachts to fast-moving racing boats. They offer a unique sailing experience, with their twin hulls providing stability and comfort while still able to reach high speeds. Catamarans can be powered by engines or sail, enabling them to move swiftly through the water.

  19. Where Did Catamaran Originate? (A Look Into Its History)

    Catamarans are thought to have originated in the South Pacific region, likely in the islands of Polynesia. The earliest catamarans are believed to have been constructed by the Austronesians around 1500 to 1000 BC. These vessels were then spread to other cultures by trading and other means of communication. Today, catamarans are used in various ...

  20. A Beginner's Guide to Catamarans

    A catamaran offers flat, even decks, wide, safe passages, and no climbing when having to move from bow to stern. Tips for Sailing a Catamaran. With its large area exposed to wind and its low draft, a sailing catamaran can drift off easily so anchoring should be performed as swiftly as possible, especially if the wind blows from the side.

  21. Meaning of "catamaran" in the English dictionary

    Definition of catamaran in the English dictionary. The first definition of catamaran in the dictionary is a sailing, or sometimes motored, vessel with twin hulls held parallel by a rigid framework. Other definition of catamaran is a primitive raft made of logs lashed together.Catamaran is also a quarrelsome woman.

  22. catamaran: meaning, synonyms

    Noun. catamaran ( pl. catamarans) A twin - hulled ship or boat. ( colloquial, rare, obsolete) A quarrelsome woman; a scold. 1889, William Makepeace Thackeray, Hobson's Choice: " She meddles with my prescriptions for your wife; she doctors the infant in private: you'll never have a quiet house or a quiet wife as long as that old Catamaran is here.

  23. Performance of ChatGPT and Google Translate for Pediatric Discharge

    10.1542/6351179324112Video AbstractPEDS-VA_2023-0655736351179324112BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES:. Patients who speak languages other than English face barriers to equitable healthcare delivery. Machine translation systems, including emerging large language models, have the potential to expand access to translation services, but their merits and limitations in clinical practice remain poorly defined.

  24. catamaran noun

    Definition of catamaran noun in Oxford Advanced American Dictionary. Meaning, pronunciation, picture, example sentences, grammar, usage notes, synonyms and more.

  25. Tech breakthrough could mean better battery life for Apple Watch

    Tech breakthrough could mean vastly improved battery life for Apple Watch and AirPods Supplier's new material for small solid-state batteries promises 100-fold leap in energy density. By David Price

  26. National Academies Issue New Broad Definition of Long COVID

    A new broadly inclusive definition of long COVID from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM) has been developed with the aim of improving consistency, documentation ...