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All you wanted to know about Yacht Crew Visa — Schengen and B1, B2

Yacht crew visas became one of the hottest topics of the summer. Many rumors were spreading around the crew hubs, and we wanted to clear out some of the unfounded rumors, and answer questions we frequently get from yacht captains and crew. For this purpose we assembled some of the leading agents in the yachting industry to help clear out this complicated subject. If you are a Greenie and just started searching for a yacht job or an experienced yachtie you will find useful information below. For information about the different locations go to our guide – How to start a yachting career . First, let’s get some of the terms out of the way.

What is Schengen?

Schengen refers to the EU passport-free zone that covers most of the European countries. It’s the largest free travel area in the world.

Schengen Visa –

According to Schengen Visa info A Schengen visa is a short-stay visa that allows a person to travel to any member of the Schengen Area , per stay up to 90 days for tourism or business purposes (Usually 90 days within 180 days, but can vary depending on nationalities). Schengen Visa can not be extended beyond the time allocated, unless unusual circumstances occur.

B1 B2 Visa –

According to Travel States.ORG Visitor visas are nonimmigrant visas for persons who want to enter the United States temporarily for business ( visa category B1 ), for tourism ( visa category B2 ), or for a combination of both purposes (B1/B2).

Schengen and B1, B2

Stamping In and Out of a boat

A formal procedure that allows yacht crew members to “Stamp out” of the EU zone and into the vessel flag. That means the Schengen visa days do not count as long as the crew is on the boat crew list. Now, to the experts. We asked, Bruno Padula , Crew formalities expert from Luise Yachting agency, based in Naples

Mr. Bruno Padula, Crew formalities expert at Luise Yachting Agency, Italy, tips and guide about Schengen visa and B1 B2 visa for Yacht Crew

Mr. Bruno Padula, Crew formalities expert at Luise Yachting Agency, Italy

Schengen visa requirements for yacht crew

A Non European Crew has to open a Schengen visa ’s application at a Schengen Embassy in His/Her home Country. As a Shipping Agency, we take part in this process by issuing a guarantee letter, stamped and signed by the Harbor Master’s office of the Port where the crew will actually sign on/embark onto the vessel. This means a Shipping Agency in Italy can not issue a guarantee letter for a crew who’s going to embark in France. Neither a Shipping Agency in Naples can issue a guarantee letter for a crew who’s going to embark in Venice. Here is a useful video providing some useful tips for B1 B2 visas as well.

Is dockwalking legal in Italy and France?

Conflicting rumors about non European crew getting detained and deported for doing dockwalking – Can you confirm and clear out the dockwalking rules? “Utterly false”, says Mr Padula, “If such an episode ever actually occurred, it must have been for serious reasons. Of course a seafarer embarked on a vessel is not authorized to leave the Port where the vessel is moored. E.g.: the vessel is moored in Naples, the seafarer comes ashore and goes to Rome, that is an official disembarkation and it must be approved by a border police office. Embark and Disembark of crew in schengen areas are authorized by the Border Police’s office only. To stress on the subject, we went and asked Lorenzo Ciquera from BWA yachting France as there were rumors around Antibes and Monaco of yacht crew getting detained for dockwalking. “Not that I’ve heard”, said Lorenzo, who you might remember from our previous article about yacht agents . “Of course, non European crew need to hold a valid Schengen visa but crew are allowed to walk the docks if they are legal in the EU.

Mr. Lorenzo Cinquera, Yacht Agent at BWA France, tips and guide about Schengen visa and B1 B2 visa for Yacht Crew

Mr. Lorenzo Cinquera, Yacht Agent at BWA France

How to sign in to a yacht?

Mr Cinquera, from BWA yachting France explains the formalities regarding the onboarding procedure. “A local agent must go with the captain to customs, with the crew passports, seaman’s book, boat papers and crew lists and the crew will get to stamp out of Europe by sea. As long as the crew stays on the crew list, he is allowed to stay in Europe with no issues.” BWA Spain specialize in yacht crew formalities and also B1 B2 visas We asked Ilianna Lincoln from BWA Spain – What happens when the visa length runs out? “If the visa expired whilst the yacht crew member is onboard, there is no problem as long as the EU stamp out procedure was done correctly and the crew member remains enrolled to the vessel (remains on the crew list and does not leave the vessel to travel). After the expiry, and when the crew member is ready to depart the vessel, he/she must be flying to their home country and will be needing an Exit Visa that allows the travel time to get home and then will need to apply for a new visa, which we can also support with a guarantee letter.”

Do Customs have different rules in Europe?

Mr. Padula, from Louise yachting agency based in Naples: “Yes there are some differences in Countries nowadays: the European Sentence 05/02/2020 n. 314/18 has attested that whenever a Seafarer, No Eu nationality, is embarking on a vessel “longtime” (winter break for instance) moored into a Schengen Port, He/She’s not allowed to receive the stamp OUT of Schengen Area on his/her passport until the actual date of departure of the Vessel from said Port. This rule is applied in some Ports of North Italy but it is not applied in France and other Italian Ports.” In Spain some ports in Mallorca allow for stamping in and out with no restrictions, while in Valencia they insist on the boat departure in order to do it. So as you can see, there is never a clear answer regarding yacht crew visas , so we highly recommend consulting with a local agent prior to conducting crew formalities.

Greece, yacht charter & private yachts regulations

Can non-Europeans be eligible to work on boats with Greek flags? Takis Vryonis, from Nautilus Shipping agencies in Athens explains the procedure and paperwork needed: Yes they can work as seafarers, with the same documents as detailed below, invitation to the Greek Embassy valid visa is required and the sign in procedure. Here are the documents to consider when embarking a yacht in Greece:

  • Seaman’s Book
  • License or other certificate with flag endorsement (master’s or engineer license)
  • Applications to port authorities including immigration, filled and signed by the agent

 Dr. Takis Vryonis, Nautilus Yachting Agency, Greece, tips and guide about Schengen visa and B1 B2 visa for Yacht Crew

Dr. Takis Vryonis, Nautilus Yachting Agency, Greece.

Get in touch with an agent:

On Seazone business locator you can find the contacts of local yacht crew agents BWA yachting profile on Seazone – France Luise yachting business profile on Seazone – Italy Nautilus yachting business profile on Seazone – Greece

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Getting to the Bottom of the B1B2 Visa for Yacht Crew

Sarah Laty 140

There are many grey areas in the yachting industry, but perhaps none as perpetually frustrating as visas, particularly the B1B2 sought by non-US yacht crew voyaging Stateside. 

Where you are from, where your boat is flagged, where you join a vessel, where it is going… there are so many variables that every inherently simple question seems to have a thousand answers, and a thousand more blog threads addressing it.

As a crew agent for many years in Antibes, I spoke to concerned crew nearly every day. Around this time each year they would collapse in the chair in front of me and disclose their dreams of working on a boat in the Caribbean.

But how should they go about it? Did they need a B1B2? Was it possible to get one? Since there was no clear gospel on the topic, we were often seen as the experts – trying to counsel our adoptive crew children through the smartest course of action without sounding too definitive or giving too much false hope.

As an American myself I am all too aware of the complicated policies of the United States. When speaking to crew about their experiences in trying to obtain a B1B2 visa, there's a sense that the process is totally random, that there are no clear rules and your fate is ultimately determined by whether or not the US Embassy worker you chance upon has had her coffee that morning.

There's probably a grain of truth to that, but we all know there are hoops to jump through on every level of administration, especially when it comes to immigration. I am sympathetic to everyone’s frustration, but I have also jumped through all manner of French legislative hoops and can say without hesitation that it is not very different.

The disheartening fact we must all accept is this: there are rules that must be followed, fees that must be paid, and documents that must be produced. No matter where you are tying to go.

The first hurdle is to understand that there is no US visa specifically created for the world of yachting. As we all know, yachting is a niche industry that lends itself to a very particular and transient lifestyle. The B1B2, though it is the most appropriate for crew working (or looking for work) on yachts, was in no way created for that purpose.

According to the US Department of State, the B1B2 is classified as a visitor visa. This means that it is a non-immigrant visa for people wishing to enter the United States temporarily. There is a B1 visa for those who wish to enter for business purposes and a B2 visa for those coming for pleasure or tourism. A B1B2 is, obviously, a combination of the two.

The B1B2 is not a work permit, nor is it equivalent in any way to a Green Card. It is also different from a C1/D visa.

Antigua Caribbean 120x630

Without confusing the issue too much, the C1/D is technically a “crew” visa, but it is primarily intended for airline personnel and commercial seafarers i.e. cruise ship, cargo, and ferry employees.

Though it might seem like this is your best bet, it is generally not sufficient. “Commercial” in this context is defined as a plane or vessel with a set itinerary.

Whether a yacht is registered commercially or for pleasure, there is no set itinerary, and so it is therefore considered a private means of transport. In the eyes of the US government, the entire yachting industry is a private industry (remember that!), thus a B1B2 is necessary. 

Let’s get back to the classic scenario. The Caribbean season is coming up. You have been working, or looking for work in the Med. Perhaps you are lucky enough to have a job lined up on a yacht heading to the US. Perhaps you want to head that way and try your luck. Yes, you do need a B1B2.

So how do crew get a B1B2 visa?

The first thing you need to do is fill out the application Form DS-160. You can find it here. You will be asked to upload your photo to the form. Be sure to print the confirmation page to take to your appointment.

Now you must schedule an appointment/interview at a US Embassy or Consulate. Generally this is done in your city of residence, but in the case of yacht crew it could be anywhere. There are always rumours floating around about how one Embassy is more or less strict than another, but if you are prepared and polite, it really shouldn’t make a difference. The time you will have to wait to get an appointment, however, will vary depending on city and the time of year. You can find approximate waiting times for different locations here. 

Next you must pay the non-refundable application fee of 160 Euros. As unfair as it might seem, there might be additional issuance fees depending on your nationality. Be sure to print the payment confirmation to take to your appointment.

Get your documents ready. Check the website of the Consulate or Embassy where you have scheduled your interview to see what they specifically request. You cannot be too prepared, so if you think it might be useful, take it along! The obvious and obligatory items are your passport (which must be valid at least 6 months beyond the length of your stay in the US), confirmation of application and payment, and a photo if you didn’t manage to upload one.

Passport Pixabay 600x400

In speaking with crew about their experiences, B1B2 interviews could last anywhere from five minutes to several hours. This is where the random bit comes in, and unfortunately there is nothing that can be done to plan for it.

The best advice is to be honest, prepared, and polite. If you have a job lined up, great. But regardless, be careful when describing your situation. If you are going to be working on a commercially registered vessel, don’t volunteer the name of the boat unless directly asked. Especially curious Embassy workers have been known to Google certain yachts to find out how they are registered. If you have employment papers, try to request them without the commercial or charter status mentioned.

Do not lie, but do avoid using these forbidden C words! You risk creating a misunderstanding that could lead to a refusal. Remember that as far as they are concerned the yachting industry is completely private. You are simply requesting a B1B2 visitor visa in order to join a private vessel in US waters.

The Foreign Affairs Manual (FAM) says that a B1 visa is available to any “crewmen of a private yacht who are able to establish that they have a residence abroad which they do not intend to abandon, regardless of the nationality of the private yacht. The yacht is to sail out of a foreign home port and cruising in US waters for more than 29 days.” The FAM is basically the guide book for all State Department and Foreign Service staff, so if you can prove that you fit this description, there is no reason to worry.

Let’s assume that all goes as planned and you walk away smiling with a visa in your pocket. Most crew think that they are in the clear at this point, but there are a few other important details to remember. First of all, which visa were you issued? The combined B1B2 is very common, but it is also possible to receive either a B1 (business), for example if you already have a job lined up, or a simple B2, for pleasure only. This is extremely important to be aware of!

Passport wikimedia Commons 600x400

In addition, they will record the status of your entry, i.e. whether you entered for business (B1) or for pleasure (B2). If you are headed to the US without a job, it is imperative that you enter as a tourist, in other words, with B2 status. With this tourist status, crew are lawfully allowed to register with crew agencies and look for work. However, it is important to note they you are not legally allowed to accept daywork.

And the fine print doesn’t end there. Not only are you not technically allowed to daywork, if you are offered a job you are not legally allowed to accept it as a B2 tourist. This requires exiting the US and returning, with boat employment papers (from a non-US flagged boat of course), and being stamped in with B1 status.

Let’s say you have followed all the rules so far but you need more time. Your B1B2 is still valid, but the date on your I-94 is running out. It is possible to extend your stay, but you must file a request (Form I-539) with the US Citizenship and Immigration Services. And you must do this before your time expires - at least 45 days before to be safe. Under no circumstances should you ever outstay the departure date on your electronic I-94. Even a day or two could mean that you are denied entry the next time around.

If you are one of the lucky ones who manages to land a job and sail away from all this mess, you should make sure that your departure from the US is recorded by the Customs and Border Patrol so that you are successfully checked out of the country. If you were previously issued a paper I-94, it should be returned to CBP. If your I-94 was electronically issued, check your status to make sure it is correct. I realize that this may seem like one slap in the face too many, but the risk of doing otherwise is really not worth it.

If you leave the country on a private vessel (which is usually the case), and your departure is never recorded, the next time you apply for admission into the US you may be accused of having overstayed your welcome the last time. If this happens, the shiny visa that you worked so hard for could be revoked, and you might be sent back to where you came from.

If you've stayed with me this far, you're probably feeling a bit sick, considering other professions, or simply cursing me and all my American-ness. It is easy to be overwhelmed and disheartened by this procedure which is far from streamlined, but don’t let it get you down. In my opinion, the problems that have surrounded this B1B2 issue for so long are due primarily to a lack of information and preparation. So consider yourself armed with the facts. You know what you need and you know what to say. Now get out there and make me proud. 

*Image credits: Pixabay ;  Wikimedia Commons ,  pixabay.com

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Comment by: Sandro Fusari - 18 Nov 2020, 18:15 (3 years ago)

Hi. I wonder if you can help me. I worked many years in cruiselines until early this year. I have a C1/D visa and wish to get a B1B2 visa, to go and work in private yachts. I don't have a job contract yet. Unfortunately, about 30 years ago I went to the States with a tourist visa, but prolonged my permanence over the allowed time. It all seemed ok then, and didn't even realised there was a problem. Now every time I pass customs I get stopped for checks, as the problem seems to reappear, but without consequences. Do you think I will have problems with my application?

Comment by: Jon Daley - 2 Oct 2020, 04:48 (4 years ago)

Hi there so with the b1 b2 if I went to US and got stamped in as b2 (no job contract) but was offered a job whilst there I would then fly to the nearest foreign country then re enter the US with contract and get stamped back in under b1? Many thanks

Comment by: William Gray - 13 Apr 2020, 18:52 (4 years ago)

Hello, Do you know if B1B2 visa is available at US consulate in Marseille? Thank you

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The Stewardess Bible

Superyacht Crew Visa’s Explained

by Kylie O'Brien | Oct 21, 2019 | The Chief Stewardess , The Superyacht | 4 comments

Superyacht Visa's Explained

What visa do I need to work on a yacht?

For this article, I am going to have to be very general about my advice.

When you are a professional yacht crew member, it is an understatement to say that you will be ‘travelling a lot’, whether it be by air, sea or land.

You will find that the one thing that comes up in conversation is what visa do I need for XXX country.

Therefore, to explain the superyacht crew visa topic, without waffling on too much, I will break down the requirements into locations.

Consequently, the three types of visa’s that we will discuss here are:

  • Schengen visa
  • USA B1/B2 visa
  • The Australian superyacht crew visa

For all visa processes and to make the application as easy and as stress-free as possible, make sure your passport is up to date with more than twelve months validity on it.

The Schengen Visa

The Schengen Area consists of 22 European Union (EU) state members and four non-EU members who are, Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway and Switzerland.

Ireland has also opted out of the Schengen policy, and they operate a separate visa policy.

At the time of writing this, the United Kingdom is battling their way through Brexit, but at this stage, UK citizens may move freely within the EU. Furthermore, the UK also run a separate visa programme.

Nationals of EU countries and Schengen nations are visa-exempt and are allowed to reside, move freely and work in each other’s countries.

For those nations outside of the EU and the Schengen visa agreement, then the following rules apply.

They are the Annexe 1 and Annexe 11.

The list of countries in Annexe I includes Asia, Africa and South America (Western part), Russia and China; this means that South Africans and Filipinos are eligible to apply.

The Annexe II countries include the USA, Canada, New Zealand, and Australia. Annexe II citizens need a visa only if they intend to stay for more than 90 days within 180 days.

Therefore, no visa is required for citizens from Annexe II countries to enter the Schengen area.

Below is a generalised explanation of the Schengen visas for non-EU citizens there are:

  • Transit type B visa
  • Short-stay type C visa
  • Longstay type D visa

The first one is the transit visa, and it is commonly known as the Type B visa. As a yacht crew member, who travels a lot, you may know this visa as an entry or exit visa.

That is to say that this visa is only required if you are passing through a Schengen state for no more than five days.

For example, Transit type B visa is very applicable if your visa has expired and you still need to travel home.

The second type is the short-stay type C visa. This visa is valid for 1 to 5 years. When the visa expires, renewal can be testing.

This visa can not be changed, renewed or extended within the Schengen area. You must leave the  Schengen area and reapply.

The documents needed for this visa are:

  • The employment letter
  • Crew/work contract
  • Port letter and yachts itinerary
  • The yachts registration details
  • Personal travel insurance

In addition to the above requirements, there is a subsection to this visa referring to the “short” part of the visa name. The short-stay relates to the 90 days in and 90 days out within a 180 day period.

Essentially this means that if the yacht intends to spend the summer months cruising within the Schengen area then, the crew member will have to be stamped out by the shipping agent, rendering the crew member limited to the yachts flagged state.

At the end of the season, the crew member can be stamped back into the Schengen area, meaning that the time spent onboard under the flag state was time sent outside of the EU or Schengen area.

The third type of visa is the Longstay type D visa. The type D visa is the best visa to obtain a because it is renewable within the Schengen area.

The visa can be obtained by presenting the same paperwork are the type C visa.

The USA is a megabase for the superyacht industry.

By its very nature, it draws hundreds of young and aspiring superyacht crew, looking for work and adventure on the high seas.

If you are not a US citizen or hold a green card, then you will need to apply for a B1/B2 visa to work on board a superyacht in US waters.

According to the U.S. State Department website,

“The visitor visa is a type of non-immigrant visa for persons desiring to enter the United States temporarily for business (B-1) or for pleasure, tourism or medical treatment (B-2)”.

This visa must not be confused with the C1/D visa which is a crew visa, broadly used for maritime personnel including a cruise ship and cargo vessels.

Unlike the Australian visa, the USA visa is not a straight forward visa to gain.

US Department of State is particularly interested in your ties with your own country.

You must be prepared to show that you pay taxes elsewhere, rent a home or can prove that you reside somewhere else in the world, which means that you are in no way interested in overstaying your visa or have illegal immigration intentions.

To obtain a B1/B2 visa, you really need to have all of your paperwork in order, including a letter of employment from your yacht.

The letter of employment is not stated on the website, so I guess it’s not technically required, but it sure will help during the interview process.

Next,  you will need to fill out a DS-160 form and make an appointment with your nearest US consulate general or embassy.

Be prepared for some tough and at times, rude questioning.

Other helpful papers, as mentioned above, include phone records, utility bills, bank statements and other documents that show that you reside happily elsewhere.

Please take the time to research this information accurately.

The Australian  Superyacht Crew Visa

The Australian superyacht crew visa was explicitly created to encourage the growth of the superyacht industry in Australia. Therefore,  it is very straight forward to gain this visa.

You must have a contract to work on a superyacht in Australian waters, and a supporting letter from the owner of the yacht confirming the person’s employment.

If you are not an Australian citizen, you will need to apply for this visa. The temporary activity visa (subclass 408)  Superyacht crew stream, allows you to work in Australia as a crewmember of a superyacht.

You can travel to and from Australia as many times as you want while your visa is valid.

The visa is valid for 12 months, with a maximum stay of up to 2 years. Furthermore, this visa is also renewable and you can do it online.

​Important Links to Check at the Time of Reading this Article

  • Schengen Visa
  • The USA B1/B2 Visa
  • The Australian Superyacht Visa

The Stewardess Bible

Elizabeth Lang

How does one get a B1Visa without a contract to work on a super yacht? My daughter is in a catch 22 as she’s done a super yacht course, madly looking for a job on all the yotspot websites but all the jobs are requesting a crew member to already have this visa in place before she’s being offered a job. It seems to be a catch 22 scenario. Does she need to go to the American Embassy in uK. It’s all very confusing! Please help

Kylie O'Brien

Hello Elizabeth, Sorry for the delayed reply, and I hope your daughter has found work already. The B1 visa is a challenge to get without a contract. Therefore I suggest she try to find employment in the Mediterranean sea or Pacific and then try for the yachts that will be travelling in US waters.

Julie

I am a US citizen and recently crossed from US to Spain. I was fired once we got to port. I decided to stay and get a seasonal job on another boat. I have had an offer from a Portaguese flagged M/Y. The question is do I need an additional VISA to go with my US passport. The job will go thru Sept/ traveling up around the Netherlands/Greece.

Hello Julie.

I’m sorry to hear about your trouble in Spain.

In my view as a US citizen, you have just 90 days on a Schengen visa. After which you will need to be signed on as crew. https://www.schengenvisainfo.com/us-citizens/#:~:text=Do%20US%20Citizens%20Need%20an%20EU%20visa%20to,visa%20for%20short-term%20tourism%20or%20a%20business%20trip .

Please note that I am not an immigration specialist, and I urge you to do your own research.

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What does yacht crew need to know about b1/b2 visas.

USA Visa Application

If you are a non-U.S. resident and the yacht you are based on plans to cruise United States waters, you will be required to have a B1/B2 visa.

In fact, a significant number of jobs we receive will ask for candidates who are in possession of a B1/B2 visa. So, if you are looking for work and would like to be considered for positions that might take you to American waters, you will want to look into obtaining this visa.

What is a B1/B2 visa?

A B1/B2 visa is a temporary, non-immigrant visa that allows the holder to travel to the United States for either business (B1) or tourism (B2) purposes. This visa allows non-U.S. crew to work on board vessels in U.S. waters. 

Generally, you should not be entering the U.S. to look for work. However, if you find yourself already in the U.S. on your B2 visa prior to coming onboard, you will have to depart the country and re-enter under the B1 visa to be able to work onboard a yacht.

How long can I stay in the US with a B1/B2 visa?

The B1/B2 visa is valid for 10 years after issue and allows you to stay in the U.S. for a maximum of 180 days per entry. 

However, you might be be permitted to stay for one year during a single entry if immigration determines that such a period is necessary for business reasons. If you need to stay even longer, you may apply for an extension while in the United States.

How do I apply for B1/B2 visa?

According to the U.S. Department of State , in order to apply for the B1/B2 visa, follow these steps:

1. File the online visa application 

You will need to complete the “DS-160” form and you will receive a 10-digit application ID and barcode. Keep these details and print out the barcode prior to the interview. Fill out DS-160 online application form .

2. Pay for the visa application fee

After you complete the DS-160 form, you will be required to pay the application fee. You can make a credit card payment in your country’s currency.

3. Schedule your interview

To schedule the interview, contact the U.S. embassy in the country you live in. You might be able to schedule your interview at another U.S. Embassy or Consulate, but be aware that it may be more difficult to qualify for a visa outside of the country where you live.

4. Prepare required documents for the interview

The documents you will need to prepare include:

Passport that is valid at least six months beyond your period of stay

10-digit application ID and barcode on ”DS-160” confirmation page

Payment receipt for the application fee

Recent identification photo of yourself

Note that additional documents may be required.

5. Attend your visa interview

Attend your visa interview with consular officer at U.S. Embassy/Consulate General on your appointment date. You may want to arrive there at least one hour prior to the interview since submission of required documents, security check, and collection of fingerprinting will be processed before the interview.

For the latest information on obtaining the B1/B2 visa always refer to the U.S. Department of State Travel.State.Gov website . YPI CREW does not take part in advising our candidates on visa related inquiries. 

Learn when a B1/B2 visa is needed and the process for obtaining it.

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Generally, a citizen of a foreign country who wishes to enter the United States must first obtain a visa, either a nonimmigrant visa for temporary stay, or an immigrant visa for permanent residence. Crewmember (D) visas are nonimmigrant visas for persons working on board commercial sea vessels or international airlines in the United States, providing services required for normal operation and intending to depart the United States on the same vessel or any other vessel within 29 days. If you travel to the United States to join the  vessel  you will work on, in addition to a crewmember (D) visa, you also need a  transit (C-1)  visa or a combination C-1/D visa.

Travel purposes which require Crewmember (D) Visas - Examples:

  • pilot or flight attendant on a commercial airplane
  • captain, engineer, or deckhand on a sea vessel
  • lifeguard, cook, waiter, beautician, or other service staff on a cruise ship
  • trainee on board a training vessel

Travel purposes not permitted on Crewmember (D) Visas - Examples:

How to apply.

There are several steps to apply for a visa. The order of these steps and how you complete them may vary at the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you apply. Please consult the instructions available on the  embassy or consulate website .

Complete the Online Visa Application

  • Online Nonimmigrant Visa Application,  Form DS-160  –  Learn more  about completing the  DS-160 . You must: 1) complete the online visa application and 2) print the application form confirmation page to bring to your interview.
  • Photo  – You will upload your photo while completing the online Form DS-160. Your photo must be in the format explained in the  Photograph Requirements .

Schedule an Interview

Interviews are generally required for visa applicants with certain limited exceptions below. Consular officers may require an interview of any visa applicant.

You should schedule an appointment for your visa interview at the  U.S. Embassy or Consulate  in the country where you live. You may schedule your interview at another U.S. Embassy or Consulate, but be aware that it may be more difficult to qualify for a visa outside of the country where you live.

Wait times for interview appointments vary by location, season, and visa category, so you should apply for your visa early. Review the interview wait time for the location where you will apply:

Appointment Wait Time

Check the estimated wait time for a nonimmigrant visa interview appointment at a U.S. Embassy or Consulate.

Note: Please check the individual Embassy or Consulate website to determine if your case is eligible for a waiver of the in-person interview.

Applicants scheduling visa appointments in a location different from their place of residence should check post websites for nonresident wait times.

Select a U.S. Embassy or Consulate:

Prepare for your interview.

  • Fees - Pay the non-refundable visa application fee , if you are required to pay it before your interview. If your visa is approved, you may also pay a visa issuance fee, if applicable to your nationality.  Fee information is provided below: 

Select your nationality to see your Issuance Fee

  • Review the instructions available on the website of the embassy or consulate where you will apply to learn more about fee payment.

Gather Required Documentation

Gather and prepare the following required documents before your visa interview:

  • Passport valid for travel to the United States  - Your passport must be valid for at least six months beyond your period of stay in the United States (unless exempt by  country-specific agreements ). Each individual who needs a visa must submit a separate application, including any family memebrs listed in your passport.
  • Nonimmigrant Visa Application ,   Form DS-160   confirmation page.
  • Application fee payment receipt , if you are required to pay before your interview
  • Photo  – You will upload your photo while completing the online Form DS-160. If the  photo upload fails , you must bring one printed photo in the format explained in the  Photograph Requirements .

Additional Documentation May Be Required

A consular officer will interview you to determine your qualifications for a crewmember visa, and may request additional documents. If transiting the United States to meet a vessel, be prepared to provide evidence you are transiting to meet the vessel, for example, a letter from your employer or your employer's agent.

Additional requested documents may include evidence of:

  • The purpose of your trip;
  • Your intent to depart the United States after your trip; and/or
  • Your ability to pay all costs of the trip. 

Evidence of your employment and/or your family ties may be sufficient to show the purpose of your trip and your intent to return to your home country. If you cannot cover all the costs for your trip, you may show evidence that another person will cover some or all costs for your trip.

Attend Your Visa Interview

A consular officer will interview you to determine whether you are qualified to receive a crewmember visa, and if so, which visa category is appropriate based on your purpose of travel. You must establish that you meet the requirements under U.S. law to receive the visa in the category for which you are applying.

Ink-free, digital fingerprint scans are taken as part of the application process. They are usually taken during your interview, but this varies based on location.

After your visa interview, the consular officer may determine that your application requires further  administrative processing . The consular officer will inform you if this is required.

After the visa is approved, you may need to pay a visa issuance fee (if applicable to your nationality), and make arrangements for the return of the passport and visa to you. Review the visa processing times to learn more.

Crewmembers Traveling to Meet Vessels

If you travel to the United States to meet and board the vessel you will work on, you need a  transit (C-1) visa . (This is in addition to the crewmember (D) visa required to work on the vessel.) The interviewing consular officer may request that you provide evidence you are transiting to meet the vessel, for example, a letter from your employer or employer's agent.

If you apply for the transit (C-1) visa at the same time as your crewmember (D) visa, you may be issued a combination C-1/D visa, if the reciprocity schedule for your country of citizenship allows for issuance of a C-1/D visa, and if the consular officer determines you are qualified. Select the  country reciprocity schedules  for more information.

Additional Information

  • You may apply for a crewmember visa without being employed at the time of your visa application. However, the crewmember visa may only be used for entry to a U.S. port if you are employed on the sea vessel or aircraft on which you arrive.
  • There is no guarantee that you will be issued a visa. Do not make final travel plans or buy tickets until you have a visa.
  • Crewmember (D) visa holders must depart the United States on a vessel within 29 days. The United States is defined as including the continental United States, Alaska, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, Guam, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. You are not considered to have departed the United States until the vessel you are on travels to international waters destined to a foreign port.
  • The operating base is where the vessel takes on supplies regularly, where the cargo of the vessel is sold ,  or where the owner or master of the vessel engages in business transactions. 
  • Your spouse and unmarried, minor children may apply for  visitor (B) visas  to accompany you, if they will not perform services required for normal operation of the vessel.
  • If your spouse and/or children plan to enter the United States for another purpose, then they must apply for the visa category required for that purpose of travel. Review  all visa categories .
  • A valid U.S. visa in an expired passport is still valid. Unless canceled or revoked, a visa is valid until its expiration date. If you have a valid visa in your expired passport, do not remove it from your expired passport. You may use your valid visa in your expired passport along with a new valid passport for travel and admission to the United States.

Visa Denial and Ineligibility

Review  Visa Denials  for detailed information about visa ineligibilities and waivers.

Visa Renewal

Whether you are applying for the first time or renewing your visa, you will use the same application process (please review  How to Apply , above).

I was refused a visa, under section INA 214(b). May I reapply?

You may reapply if you believe you have additional evidence of your qualifications for a crewmember visa, or you believe your circumstances have changed. Review  Visa Denials  to learn more.

Misrepresentation or Fraud

Attempting to obtain a visa by the willful misrepresentation of a material fact, or fraud, may result in the permanent refusal of a visa or denial of entry into the United States.

Review  Ineligibilities and Waivers: Laws

Citizens of Canada and Bermuda

Citizens of Canada and Bermuda do not require visas to enter the U.S. for the purpose of travel, as a crewmember. For more information see  U.S. Embassy Ottawa website ,  U.S. Consulate Hamilton website  and  CBP website .

Further Questions

  • Case-Specific Questions  - Contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate handling your visa application for status information. Select  U.S. Embassy or Consulate  for contact information.
  • General Questions  - review  Contact Us .

More Information

A-Z Index Lost/Stolen Travel Documents Denials Fraud Warning Border Security/Safety Visa Expiration Date Automatic Revalidation Nonimmigrants in the United States–Applying for Visas in Canada or Mexico Visa Applicants - State Sponsors of Terrorism Find a U.S. Embassy or Consulate Customer Service Statement

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My Crew Kit

Visa’s & Documentation for Yacht Crew

Find out about the most commonly required documentation.

Firstly, it is essential to have an up to date passport with free pages available for stamps and visas. It is also advisable to get a MAXI Passport if possible as you will receive multiple stamps as you cruise between countries and islands. Passport issues can impact job security and it is your responsibility to ensure your passport is up to date. Find a Visa Application Service to Assist You.

  • B1/B2 Visa (USA) : This visa is crucial if you are a non-American crew member applying for positions on International flagged vessels cruising in the US waters. The visa can be valid anywhere from 1-10 years, depending on your situation and nationality. It is important to understand that this visa does not allow you to seek a job whilst in the USA or to be employed on a US-flagged vessel. It simply allows you to cruise in US waters and to transit through the USA customs to and from your vessel.
  • Schengen Visa (EUROPE) : The Schengen visa is necessary for most non-European and non-British crew. It allows you to move freely between all the European countries that make up the Schengen area. It can be obtained from the embassy of your first point of entry into Europe.
  • Seamans Discharge Book : Once you are employed on a vessel you may apply for a Seamans Discharge Book from the flag state of the vessel on which you are employed. This may be useful for tax purposes and in certain circumstances, it may even act as a passport if you do not have the necessary visa for a certain area.

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What Visa Do You Need To Work On Superyachts?

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Depending on where you plan to look for your first job in yachting and your nationality, you may need to look into what visa is required for you to legally enter countries and work onboard. 

Here are 3 visa’s to consider for the yachting seasons:

B1/b2 visa (caribbean and us season).

This is a multi-entry visa for yacht crew to work onboard superyachts cruising the US ((including US Waters). For the Caribbean yachting season, most yachts cruise in US waters so if you’re not a US Citizen you’ll most likely need a B1/B2 visa. This visa is notoriously hard for green crew to obtain without boat papers, for more information on how to obtain this visa check out my blog article The B1/B2 Visa To Work on Boats In The US & Caribbean . Or for more information peruse the US Embassy website .

Schengen Visa (Mediterranean Season)

Schengen refers to the EU passport-free zone that covers most of European countries. According to Schengen Visa Info, the Schengen visa is a short-stay visa that allows a person to freely travel to any members of the  Schengen Area , per stays up to 90 days for tourism or business purposes. There are three classifications for crew using the Schengen visa; Transit, Short stay and long stay.

As green crew you will usually enter on this visa for travel purposes allowing you 90 days within the EU. Some advice here: do not mention anything about work to the embassy, I would also recommend having proof of funds to support your stay and a flight or train out of the EU region or at least a ‘plan’ to leave the EU after 90 days, this is in case of the embassy questions you upon entry. For specific information on your nationality, I recommend having a look at the Schegnen Info Website. Here are some links for US Citizens , South Africans , British and the new rules for Australians and New Zealand citizens starting January 1, 2023,  where they can apply for a visa waiver prior to their travel to Europe.

According to The European Commission website, from November 2023 , visitors that do  not need a visa to enter Europe  will be able to register with European Travel Information and Authorisation System (ETIAS). ETIAS will become a mandatory entry requirement.

Once the EU ETIAS travel authorization becomes operational, all citizens from the current visa-free countries will be required to submit an application before their trip. However, for the time being, they can continue to travel to Europe using the Schengen system without applying online for travel authorization. As always please do some research into this on a official government website as information can change according to different nationalities.

Australian Superyacht Crew Vis a

According to the Australian Government to be eligible for a Superyacht Crew visa you must have a contract to work as a superyacht crew member, a letter from the owner of the superyacht confirming the person’s employment as a member of the crew of the vessel or have a supporter or a sponsor, depending on your circumstances. It’s a 3, 6 or 12-month visa for crew and you must meet certain requirements, for more details on this check out this Superyacht Australia article and current pricing for the visa on the Australian Government website .

In addition to having the right visa to enter a country to work in the yachting industry, you should try to have 12 months of validity on your passport . It is much easier in your home country to renew your passport or apply for a passport, when you’re at sea it can cause a lot of hassles.

Having your certificates and qualifications scanned onto your computer or a USB is also very useful as you will find you will need to submit these frequently when applying for jobs so having them online makes the process easier. It is very important to also carry hard copies (such as your SCTW and ENG1 medical) at all times.

The Seamans Discharge Book

Once you are employed on a yacht you may apply for a Seamans Discharge Book from the flag state of the vessel on which you are employed. This may be useful for tax purposes and in certain circumstances, it may even act as a passport if you do not have the necessary visa for a certain area. Usually, the boat will be able to help you with your application and will need to sign off on the documentation.

Places that do not require a Visa to work on yachts

The UAE, Maldives, Seychelles  and most of the South Pacific  are destinations that DO NOT require crew to have a specific type of visa to join. So there is the potential to land a job at the end of the Med season in Antibes, on a yacht that is destined for these places in the winter period I recommend if you’re planning to jump on the tail end of the Med season and hoping to snap up one of these job opportunities… Get there in September. ​ By the end of October, Antibes can be a ghost town with few yachts in sight. Not good for job-hunting prospects.

Now is also a good time to upskill and perfect that yachting CV because… let’s be real it’s fierce out there! 🔥🔥🔥

Here are some useful links which could help point you in the right direction ​

  • ​ 7 Ways To Nail Your First 7 Days As A Yacht Stew  – Freebie guide! ​ ​
  • ​ How to write a yachting CV Blog
  • The Seaworthy Yacht Stewardess Online Training Course – Course

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By SuperyachtNews 14 Nov 2018

Inconsistencies with issuing of US visas to yacht crew continue

We look at how current us immigration policy has impacted foreign crew entering the country….

Image for article Inconsistencies with issuing of US visas to yacht crew continue

Immigration policy in the United States (US) seems stricter than ever following the actions of the Trump administration. There have even been reports circulating the superyacht industry of a crackdown on applications for certain visas needed for crew to enter the US – a major concern as the country is an important hub for many yachts employing foreign crew.

Traditionally, B-1/B-2 visas have been used by foreign crew to enter the US on foreign-flagged superyachts. B-1/B-2 visas are classed as visitor visas and are described by the US authorities as being “for persons who want to enter the United States temporarily for business (visa category B-1), tourism, pleasure or visiting (visa category B-2), or a combination of both purposes (B-1/B-2)”. Periods of stay for B-1 visas may be granted initially to allow the visitor to conduct business for up to a maximum of six months and can be extended for another six months. Because of the permitted length of stay, and because no fixed schedule is needed, these categories are viewed as the most suitable visa options for foreign crew working on yachts.

However, there are many reports of crewmembers having problems obtaining such visas, which has sparked rumours that embassies are no longer seeing this as an appropriate visa for crew working on superyachts and are suggesting that a C-1/D visa should be obtained instead.

Crewmember (D) visas are described as “for persons working on board sea vessels or international airlines in the United States, providing services required for normal operation and intending to depart the United States on the same vessel or any other vessel within 29 days”. If crew travel to the United States to join the vessel, in addition to a crewmember (D) visa, they will also need a transit (C-1) visa or a combination C-1/D visa. Due to the very nature of yachting, this 29-day limit is not the most suitable option for yacht crew.

The Department of State is currently working on guidance on issuing yacht visas...

While there is still no clear-cut information, it seems that the issue is being addressed. Patience Cohn, industry liaison for the Marine Industries Association of South Florida (MIASF), says the Department of State is currently working on guidance on issuing yacht visas. “At the American Boating Congress in Washington DC in May, the MIASF held a panel alongside representatives of the Department of State and Customs and Border Protection [CBP], which resulted in an open discussion and a better understanding of some of the misunderstandings that were resulting in visa denials,” she says.

During the panel discussion, a number of misconceptions and issues were brought to light. Some of the following items were included in the points raised:

• Consular offices have often refused to issue both C1/D and B1/B2 visas to foreign yacht crew. Once they find out that a foreign-flagged yacht offering employment to a crewmember has been offered for charter in the past, they refuse to issue a B1/B2 and sometimes none at all. It doesn’t matter if the vessel has changed to a private yacht or that a foreign- flagged yacht cannot be offered for charter in the US;

• Inconsistencies between US embassies have resulted in foreign crew going ‘embassy shopping’. For example, UK nationals are choosing to go to the US Belfast Embassy instead of the US London Embassy because Belfast has a reputation for granting a 10-year B1/B2 visa as opposed to a one-year B1 visa in London;

Inconsistencies between US embassies have resulted in foreign crew going ‘embassy shopping’...

• Some crewmembers have been denied the B1/B2 visa and instead been issued with the C1/D visa only to have this rejected by the CBP when they enter the US. Therefore, the difference between consulate and CBP determination is a problem because some consular officers do not seem to understand the intricacies of the laws and regulations that apply to foreign-flagged yachts when entering US waters;

• Some individuals may be denied a B1/B2 visa because they are not yet working on a yacht even though, to qualify for employment, crewmembers must often show that they already have a B1/B2 visa;

• Some crewmembers have been advised that they cannot fly into a US airport with the intention of signing on to a vessel in a US port but must join outside the US and sail into US waters, which seriously affects the swapping out of crews.

Concerned by the adverse impact that a growing distrust of this visa process for foreign superyacht crew might have on businesses and the yachting sector in the US, the panel discussed how to improve the situation. They concluded that further guidance was needed on vessel status – what documentation is required and accepted – and on the issuing of both C1/D and B1/B2 visas, whether this could be institutionalised for yacht crewmembers.

Included on the panel was Debora Radtke, owner of American Yacht Agents, who dismisses rumours that the B1/ B2 visa is no longer applicable to superyacht crew. “The clarification on that was that we are advising crew to apply for both the C1/D and the B1/ B2 visas as this covers them if they are arriving on either a commercial vessel or a private vessel,” she says. “This is also the standard procedure in the aviation industry.”

The onus is on the applicant to prove they do not want to move to the United States... This is also why we advise crew to provide as much proof of strong ties to their home country as possible.

However, Radtke points out, with a word of warning, that the biggest takeaway from the panel was that the representative from the Department of State made it clear that their directive for all non-immigrant visa applications is to assume the applicant intends to immigrate. “What this means is that the onus is on the applicant to prove they do not want to move to the United States,” she adds. “This is also why we advise crew to provide as much proof of strong ties to their home country as possible.”

While it appears there are still inconsistencies in how the US visa application process is enforced across different US embassies, there are certainly actions crew can take to give themselves the best possible chance for their application to be accepted. In addition to detailed vessel and cruising information, crew should be showing officials additional documentation including their contract, evidence of financial security and any proof of ties to a home country that makes clear an intention to return. It is important to note that all applications are still subject to the decision of the interviewer at the time and that different embassies have different expectations, so unfortunately there is no guarantee of a successful application. The industry can only hope that a blanket approach is adopted soon.

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  • Yachting Industry

What is the yachting industry?

Yachts range in size from 50-450 ft. For the most part they are owned by individuals who vacation onboard. Yachts that are used uniquely by the owner, his family and friends are referred to as private. If an owner leases his yacht to a third party the yacht is considered a charter yacht. Both private and charter yachts in all size ranges require crew to maintain and run the vessel. The itinerary (where the vessel travels) is determined by the owner. Standards of service, while usually very high, vary from yacht to yacht. For the most part, yachting is an industry that brings together like minded people as crew who are prepared to work hard. Yachting is unlike any other industry and, as such, the rewards and expectations are unique.

How do I get started in the yachting industry?

First of all you are in the right place. Luxury Yacht Group is regarded as the industry leader for the proper placement of crew and we receive job orders from employers on a daily basis. To get started in the yachting industry there are a couple of key steps. Firstly, research and understand the industry by reading the following frequently asked questions and familiarizing yourself with the rest of our website. Secondly, complete your online LYG registration. Finally, we encourage all crew to obtain their Basic STCW 95.

Do yachts hire people with no experience in yachting?

Absolutely! The most common entry-level positions which offer new crew the ability to learn the “ropes” of yachting are:

Depending on your previous work background, you may fit very well into a role as yacht crew. Although there are no solid “requirements” for some entry level positions, each Captain will put forth a list of his/her specific “preferences” in a candidate. Should your background be consistent with what the owner or Captain may be looking for, you should be prepared to undertake any variety of duties that would include:

  • Cabin preparation
  • Detailing the interior of the vessel
  • Food service
  • Drink service
  • Detailing exterior
  • Line handling

What skills do I have that would be useful on a yacht?

For new to industry crew, there are many ways to make yourself more appealing to yacht owners and Captains. Emphasize your present skills and experience and focus on what characteristics you have may be applicable to the job you desire. There are a variety of skills that can help give you an edge, such as:

  • Nanny / Babysitting / Au Pair
  • Formal service training / Silver Service / White Glove
  • Carpentry / Woodworking
  • Diving / Water sports
  • Experience in a Hotel, Resort, Cruise Ship, Restaurant or Estate
  • CPR, First Aid certification or any emergency medical training
  • Masseuse / Esthetician license

What if I get seasick?

You can expect to have to work regardless.

Do I need a visa to work on a boat that cruises US waters?

Many foreign flagged yachts will only hire non-American crew if they hold a B1/B2 visa for the United States. A C1-D visa is not appropriate for private yacht crew. If you do not have a B1/B2 visa a Captain may be willing to hire you on the condition that you are prepared to obtain the visa, then you can apply for the visa using boat documents. Please visit our resources section for more visa information.

What is STCW 95?

The STCW training classes include the following elements:

Personal Survival Techniques

  • Fire Prevention and Fire Fighting
  • Elementary First Aid
  • Personal Safety and Social Responsibility
  • Competence in Security Awareness

Elementary First-Aid Training

One day First Aid and CPR which is instructed in compliance with STCW Code A-VI/1-3 and consists of approximately seven hours of theory and practical covering basic First Aid and CPR in marine situations. The course is followed by a written exam.

Basic Fire Prevention and Fire Fighting

Two day fire prevention and fire fighting module which is instructed in compliance with STCW Code A – VI/1-2 including shipboard fire fighting organization, the elements of fire and explosion, types of ignition, fire and smoke detection, breathing apparatus use and automatic alarm system familiarization. Trainees will fight and extinguish actual fires using personal equipment, practical instruction taught by licensed and certified fire fighting professionals.

Proficiency in Maritime Security Awareness

A half day module which is instructed in compliance with STCW Reg V1/6 and Part A of Section A-VI/6 paragraph 4 and consists of a half day in the classroom covering subjects such as maritime security key threats, recognition and awareness of threats, plans and procedures for combatting threats, drills, communications and reporting.

This module is required from January 1, 2014 as a part of the update to the STCW Code mandated by the 2010 Manila Amendments, by all personnel employed or engaged on-board ships to which the ISPS Code applies.

One and a half day personal survival course module, also known as Basic Sea Survival, which is instructed in compliance to STCW Code A – VI/1-1 and consists of a day in the classroom covering subjects such as emergency situations, evacuation, survival craft and rescue boats, personal lifesaving appliances, survival at sea, emergency radio equipment and helicopter assistance. The theory part is followed by a written exam. The remainder of the course is spent in a swimming pool performing the simulation of abandon ship procedures. The practical exercises are subject to ongoing assessment by the instructor.

Personal Safety and Social Responsibilities

This is a one day course which is instructed to STCW Code A – VI/1-4 as revised by the 2010 Manila Amendment. The course covers working relationships on board, health and hygiene, drugs and alcohol, shipboard management structure and responsibilities, emergencies and safe working practices, with enhanced coverage of communications, control of fatigue, teamwork and marine environmental awareness issues. The course is followed by a written exam.

  • Registration

How does the LYG system work?

Luxury Yacht Group introduces employers to crew through a balance of technology and personal contact. Our website is database driven, so it is in your best interest to keep your online registration updated. In addition, our crew coordinators have the capacity to introduce you to many employers so approach all interaction with a high level of decorum.

To get the most from our system:

  • Login to our site on a regular basis and check your My Jobs page. Our database will alert you to open jobs for which you may be an appropriate candidate.
  • For each of these jobs either confirm or decline your interest. If you confirm interest our crew coordinators and the employer will be able to view your details and you are then a potential candidate for the position.
  • Most importantly, we request crew to change their availability status to unavailable when they are no longer looking for work.
  • If you find work remember to update your availability and experience.
  • If you complete a course update your certifications.
  • If you update your resume make sure to upload the latest version.

By keeping your online file current you are helping our crew coordinators to find you your dream job.

What is the first step after I register?

Once you are registered and your file is adequately complete the system will indicate to you that you can submit your file for consideration. Once you have submitted your file our team of crew coordinators will review your file and begin the reference verification process.

  • Finding Work

What positions are available on luxury yachts?

Depending on the size of the yacht, you will find a variety of positions. See our job descriptions page for more details.

Can yachting be a career?

Of course, and many yachtsmen have dedicated themselves to the industry and established successful careers. LYG is committed to helping you make yachting a career. Once you are placed and gaining experience please stay in contact with your crew coordinator. Our web site is a great tool to providing extensive information on licensing and training and you may track your experience and longevity in relation to salary and certifications.

How long will it take to find a job?

This is not an easy question to answer. Yachts are always looking for crew and in many instances it is about being in the right place at the right time. There are many factors that contribute to your "place-ability" and consequently the time it will take to find a job. The best thing to do is to be well presented on paper and in person. Stay in touch with your crew coordinator and check your My Jobs page frequently.

How do I make my interviews successful?

First impressions are paramount, it is important to make a terrific, lasting impression.

  • Make sure to arrive on time, dress in professional yachting attire and be immaculately presented.
  • Bring copies of your resume, licenses and references.
  • Please don't chew gum, smell of cigarettes or wear excessive jewelry.
  • Turn off your cell phone and try to keep your tattoos hidden.
  • Greet your interviewer with a firm handshake and make eye contact.
  • Speak with confidence and be honest about your experience and ability.
  • Be clear about your career objectives and how they apply to your career path.
  • Stress positives, avoid negatives.
  • Keep your questions focused on the job and its requirements - not the benefits.

What can I do to increase my chances of finding the right job?

Return job related phone calls and emails promptly. While you are waiting for an employer to contact you we suggest that you enroll in additional courses to increase your suitability for your dream job. Maritime Training Schools offer entry level courses for interior and deck departments in the following areas:

  • Professional Etiquette and Social Skills
  • International Table Service (French, Russian, etc.)
  • Interior and Exterior Detailing
  • Bartending and drink service
  • Wine courses
  • Flower arranging
  • Massage Therapy
  • Boat handling and general boat operations

Please visit our resource section for list of schools in your area.

Is there a right time of year to find work on a yacht?

Yachts move around the globe in predictable patterns based on the season.

Fort Lauderdale is the nucleus of the industry year round and especially during the shoulder seasons (beginning and end of summer and winter). From April to September the Mediterranean (Antibes, France) and New England are the hubs of the industry. From October to March the Caribbean becomes the focal point.

We recommend that you base yourself in one of the yachting capitals at the appropriate time of year to facilitate finding a job.

Although we place crew at all times of the year the busiest time for crew turnover is at the end of each season.

Ok sounds good - How do I find my dream job?

Registration with Luxury Yacht Group is free. You can complete the application process online from anywhere in the world. We require from you:

  • Personal Information
  • Objectives – What you wish to achieve
  • Certificates – Your qualifications
  • Experience – Your past employment
  • References – Contact information for previous employers
  • Resume / CV – Uploaded in Word format
  • Digital Photograph – Passport Style in professional attire

The application process should take about 15–20 minutes. LYG requires a minimum of three past work experiences and references in addition to an uploaded resume and digital photograph before your application is complete and we can consider you for our available jobs.

What can I do to stand out from the crowd?

Make sure your LYG online profile is properly completed and always current. Your photo must be a professional reflection of you. Your statement of career objectives should be professional, concise and honest. Also, make sure to upload a simple, professional resume (two pages maximum) that shows all yachting related employment and skills.

  • Expectations

What salary can I expect?

Salary guidelines are based on industry experience, licensing and longevity. As an entry level candidate you can expect to be at the lower end of the pay scale. If your salary expectations are unreasonable most employers will disregard you. It is in your best interest to request a competitive, realistic salary and be placed. The good news is that your salary will undoubtedly improve as you gain experience in the industry. View Salary Guidelines

What will be expected of me once I am onboard?

Crewing on a yacht is not glamorous. It is not a vacation and it is certainly not for the faint hearted. At an entry level, you can expect your living quarters to be tight and your tasks to be menial. You will often have to work extremely long hours without a break or a day off. In addition you can expect to work holidays and weekends and be away from your family for extended periods of time. You need to carry out your job with a smile and pleasant demeanor — regardless of your level of exhaustion.

The good news is that when you do have time off you may be in a beautiful corner of the world, the crew onboard have become your friends and you will undoubtedly experience the true meaning of being a "yachtie".

What are general Terms of Employment on a yacht?

Again, working on a yacht is not comparable to any land based industry. Many (but not all) yachts may ask you to sign crew agreements, non-disclosure agreements, or comprehensive job descriptions. Crew are normally paid on a monthly basis and are rarely compensated for overtime. Many yachts offer benefit packages that can include health insurance, paid vacations (from 2–8 weeks per annum), annual flights and education allowances. Although your crew coordinator can make recommendations regarding your conditions of employment, you are responsible for all employment related negotiations.

I work on a cruise ship — can I work on a private yacht?

Cruise ship personnel have many skills that transfer to the private yachting industry, though it is important to remember that it is not the same industry. Crew on private yachts tend to work longer hours and have more extensive job descriptions with less time off. We suggest that anyone with cruise ship experience research our job description pages to get an idea of how employment on yachts differs to cruise ships.

Captains and engineers with a cruise ship background often have advanced licenses and ISM experience which can be beneficial to luxury yachts so remember to emphasize this on your application and resume.

Housekeeping skills are easily transferable and, as such, Cruise Ship Housekeeping personnel are regularly placed in the yachting industry.

However, the move to the yachting industry may require even experienced cruise ship personnel to compromise their hierarchal status and prove they are an integral crew member before moving up the ranks.

B1B2 Visas for Yacht Crew: How to Get Approved?

B1B2 visas are one of the most popular types of visas for yacht crew. They allow you to work in the United States for up to six months, and they are relatively easy to get approved for. The main requirements are that you have a valid passport, a letter from your employer, and a return ticket.

If you are planning to work on a yacht in the United States, you will need to get a B1B2 visa. This visa allows you to work in the United States for up to six months. To get this visa, you will need to have a valid passport, a letter from your employer, and a return ticket. The process for getting this visa is relatively straightforward, and as long as you have all of the required documents, you should be able to get approved.

b1b2 visa for yacht crew

1. The B1B2 Visa for yacht crew allows entry into the US for up to one year.

The B1B2 visa for yacht crew allows entry into the US for up to one year, providing you meet certain eligibility requirements. In order to be eligible for this visa, you must be employed by a yacht owner or management company and have a valid job offer from them. You must also have a valid passport, and be able to show that you have the required skills and experience for the position you are applying for.

Once you have met all of the eligibility requirements, you can apply for the B1B2 visa by filling out an application form and submitting it to the US embassy or consulate in your home country. You will also need to provide evidence of your employment, such as a contract or letter from your employer, as well as evidence of your skills and experience. Once your application has been submitted, you will be interviewed by a consular officer, who will then decide whether or not to issue you a visa.

2. The visa is available to citizens of over 50 countries.

The vast majority of yacht crew hail from countries that participate in the U.S. Department of State’s Visa Waiver Program (VWP). This permits eligible citizens or nationals of specific countries to travel to the United States for tourism or business for stays of 90 days or less without obtaining a visa. 

The VWP is not without its caveats though and there have been instances where yacht crew have found themselves in hot water for unknowingly violating the terms of their stay. If you are planning to come to the United States to work on a yacht – either as crew or as a charter guest – it is imperative that you understand the rules and regulations of the VWP to avoid any problems. 

b1b2 visa for yacht crew

The visa waiver program is administered by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the Department of State. It allows citizens of participating countries to travel to the United States for business or pleasure, for stays of 90 days or less, without first obtaining a visa. 

Travelers must have a valid passport from a VWP country, and must apply for authorization through the Electronic System for Travel Authorization (ESTA) before boarding a carrier to travel by air or sea to the United States. 

ESTA is the automated system that determines the eligibility of visitors to travel to the United States under the Visa Waiver Program and the conditions of their visit. 

In order to be eligible for the VWP, citizens of participating countries must meet all of the following requirements: 

-Be a citizen or national of a Visa Waiver Program country

-Have a machine-readable passport

-Have a passport with a digital photo or integrated chip

-Register online through the Electronic System for Travel Authorization (ESTA) 

-Pay the ESTA application fee

-Receive an authorization to travel from ESTA

It is important to note that the VWP does not entitle travelers to work in the United States. 

If you are coming to the United States to work on a yacht, you will need to obtain the appropriate visa. The most common visa used by yacht crew is the B-1/B-2 visa, which permits temporary entry into the United States for business or pleasure. 

 To qualify for a B-1/B-2 visa, you must: 

-Be a citizen of a country that has a treaty of friendship, commerce and navigation with the United States

-Have a valid passport

-Have an itinerary of your travel plans in the United States

-Show evidence of funds to support yourself during your stay

-Demonstrate ties to your home country that would compel you to return at the end of your stay

-Be able to demonstrate that you are coming to the United States for a specific, limited purpose and that you will depart the United States upon the completion of that purpose

-Be admissible to the United States

3. Yacht crew must have a job offer from a US-based employer.

A job offer is required for B1B2 visas for yacht crew. The offer must be from a U.S. based employer and must be for a position in the yacht industry. The offer must be for a position that is crew-related, such as captain, mate, engineer, or deckhand. It is important to note that B1B2 visas for yacht crew are not available for positions that are not related to the operation of the vessel, such as stewardess or chef. 

The U.S. company that is sponsoring the applicant must complete and sign the I-129 form which is available on the USCIS website. The I-129 must be accompanied by a copy of the applicant's seafarer's identification and record book, as well as a copy of their seafarer's discharge book, if applicable. 

The I-129 form must be sent to the USCIS Service Center with jurisdiction over the area where the U.S. company is located. A complete list of USCIS Service Centers is available on the USCIS website. 

The I-129 form must be accompanied by the following:

-A copy of the applicant's passport

-A copy of the applicant's seafarer's identification and record book

-A copy of the applicant's seafarer's discharge book, if applicable

-A job offer from a U.S. based employer in the yacht industry

-Evidence that the applicant is qualified for the position they have been offered, such as a resume, licenses, or transcripts

-The filing fee for the I-129 form, which is $460

4. The employer must provide a contract and additional documentation.

The employer must provide a contract and additional documentation in order to apply for a B1B2 visa for yacht crew members. The contract must state the terms of the employment, including the salary, duties, and length of the contract. It must also include the employer's contact information. In addition, the employer must provide evidence of the vessel's registration and proof of insurance.

b1b2 visa for yacht crew

5. Yacht crew must have a valid passport and meet other requirements.

As the crew member of a yacht, you will need to have a valid passport in order to be approved for a B1B2 visa. There are a few other requirements that you will need to meet in order to be eligible for this type of visa. In order to be approved, you must: 

-Be a citizen of a country that participates in the Visa Waiver Program 

-Have a passport that is valid for at least six months after your planned stay in the United States 

-Have a valid U.S. visa (if you have one) 

-Pay the visa application fee 

-Submit a completed visa application form 

If you are applying for a B1B2 visa, you will need to show that you have ties to your home country and that you intend to return there after your stay in the United States. You can do this by showing evidence of your family and financial ties to your home country. 

The best way to show that you have ties to your home country is to have a letter from your employer stating that you have a job to return to. You can also show evidence of your family ties by providing letters from your family members or documentation of your property ownership in your home country. If you have financial ties to your home country, you can provide bank statements or documentation of your investments. 

You will also need to show that you have enough money to support yourself during your stay in the United States. You can do this by showing your bank statements or providing a letter from your sponsor. 

If you are able to meet all of these requirements, you will likely be approved for a B1B2 visa.

6. The visa application process takes several weeks.

It can take several weeks for an application for a B1B2 visa to be processed. During this time, the applicant will need to provide the US government with a variety of information and documents, including proof of their identity, proof of employment, and a travel itinerary. They will also need to undergo a medical examination and a criminal background check. Once the visa is approved, the applicant will be able to pick it up at a US embassy or consulate.

7. Yacht crew can expect to undergo an interview during the application process.

When applying for a B1B2 visa as a yacht crew member, you can expect to undergo an interview during the application process. This interview is typically conducted by a consular officer at the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you are applying.

The purpose of the interview is to determine whether you are eligible for a B1B2 visa and to gather information about your travel plans. During the interview, the consular officer will ask you questions about your employment on the yacht, your travel plans, and your ties to your home country.

You should be prepared to answer questions about your employment, including your job duties and the length of your employment contract. You should also be prepared to discuss your travel plans in detail, including your itinerary and the purpose of your trip.

b1b2 visa for yacht crew

It is important to remember that the interview is an opportunity for the consular officer to get to know you and to determine whether you are eligible for a visa. There is no one right or wrong answer to the questions asked during the interview. The most important thing is to be honest and to provide complete and accurate information.

B1B2 visas for yacht crew are available for those who meet the necessary requirements. The process is relatively simple and straightforward, and can be completed in a relatively short period of time. With the proper documentation and the correct application, there is no reason why an individual should not be able to obtain a B1B2 visa for yacht crew.

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Get your B1B2 Visa NOW and start your journey tomorrow

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The importance of B1B2 visas for all yachtcrew

For many years Evolution has been offering assistance to yacht crew needing B1B2 visas . In the pre-COVID era, our team pretty much exclusively assisted yachts based in Spain to process applications at the US Embassy in Madrid as soon as cruising US waters was confirmed for the clients´ upcoming season. This meant usually in August or September we would have a flurry of requests and would coordinate appointments for October and November. The whole process would take 2 weeks maximum from the moment we received the request to the moment the crew had their visa in hand. 

The landscape looks very different now , in 2022 to date we have processed over 350 applications in 13 different US embassies worldwide and the requests have been entering our inboxes in a steady stream since around April.

Every non-US superyacht crew member should have a B1/B2 Visa to enter American waters either onboard the vessel as crew or if flying in by plane to embark in a US port. The visa allows its holder to temporarily enter the U.S. for periods of up to 6 months at a time and can be valid up to a period of 10 years .

For about 9 months during COVID, US embassies did not accept applications for any tourist visa (B1B2 is a business/tourism visa) so many appointments that were confirmed prior to this were cancelled and seafarers lodging new applications were not accepted or found the calendars were closed completely. Since reopening, at various intervals, due to certain world events, the US government was prioritizing refugees , so we are currently seeing a massive backlog of visa applications after 2 years of stops and starts . The Madrid embassy shows it´s next published appointment dates in 2024 and others such as Paris only have availability at the tail end of 2023. Others such as Brussels have only been offering rush appointments to Belgian residents and Italy and Ireland have had a closed calendar for the best part of the last month (as per the date of this writing this article) meaning absolutely no appointments for non-immigrant visas are possible.

The cost to vessels and to crew personally has been very great this season - due to the fact that applicants have had to grab any availability that comes up, meaning last minute flights to other countries, hotels and time away from the vessel all adding to the personal and financial expense. Many jobs on the market are conditional on crew having a valid B1B2 visa and some crew have even lost their jobs for not being able to get one in time. It can be a lengthy, costly, and stressful experience for all involved.

Taking a look at calendars for 2023, crew should expect this lengthy process to remain . At Evolution we are advising captains and crew that they should make the most of any downtime to get the appointments locked in, whether or not the vessel is heading to US waters. A B1B2 visa should be considered as important as a ENG1 or STCW certificate on the resume of anyone willing to work onboard a superyacht . Investing in the time and the cost now makes you an attractive candidate and crew member to captains and recruitment agencies . Most crew will receive a 10-year visa so look at it as a long-term career investment!  

Evolution offers assistance with appointment scheduling and can provide guidance from start to finish . Thanks to our great experience and our alliance with the World League of Agents , we are able to l ook for the best option to suit their situation at many US embassies located in the EU and outside.

Get in touch with our team at [email protected] and arrange yours now, to be able to cruise tomorrow. 

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Deckhand , Stewardess , Yacht Jobs

B1/b2 visa to work on yachts 2024.

  • January 10, 2024

To obtain a B1/B2 visa it is important that you apply for a  B1/B2 Visa to work on yachts 2024, at your closest US-embassy or Consulate. You need to have the right paperwork and apply through the website.

B1/B2 Visa to work on yachts 2024

  • Have a valid passport
  • Submit an online DS-160 Application at the US Embassy website
  • Schedule an interview at the US embassy
  • Pay the Application fee
  • Get a US approved passport photograph
  • Bring the correct paperwork for you application

How to I get a B1/B2 Visa to work on Yachts ?

You first need to make sure you have all the required training and certification to become yacht crew and join a Yacht with Yachtiecaareers as a Deckhand or Stewardess .

Step 1 – Select your training package 

Step 2 – Complete the STCW Basic Safety Training week

Step 3 – We write your new Yacht CV

Step 4 – We apply for the B1/B2 Visa 

Step 5 – Join a Yacht in Europe, Caribbean or US with your new B1/b2 Visa. 

How much does a B1/B2 Visa cost for Yacht Crew ? 

  As US B1/B2 visa application costs 160US$ , this is paid when doing the Visa Application and submitting the form online and scheduling the interview.

How do I submit a US B1/B2 Visa Application for Yacht Crew ?

You can go to the US embassy website and fill in the application form online in order to get a B1/B2 Visa to work on yachts 2024

Where can I apply for a US B1/B2 Visa for Yacht Crew?

This is done online and after the DS160 application you will need to visit the US Embassy or consulate where you booked the appointment. You can find your closest US embassy by visiting the website.

In Europe this can be done in:

As well as many other major cities. It is important to note that each embassy have their own guidelines for issuing the  B1/B2 Visa to work on yachts 2024 , you might for example get the application approved from an Embassy in Sweden or Italy, while being rejected when doing the same application in Paris to get a B1/B2 Visa to work on yachts 2024

What documents do I need to get a B1/B2 Visa for Yacht Crew ?

  The absolute best way to get a US B1/B2 visa approved is to get the paperwork issued from the Yacht where you are employed. With this you are almost certain of having the US visa application approved.

You can also apply for the Visa by showing that it is a requirement to join Yacht in Europe, US and Caribbean and that you are a Seafarer with the right certificates or Seamans book.

At Yachtiecareers we can help you obtain a B1/B2 Visa for yacht crew by issuing the necessary paperwork showing that we intend to recruit you on board Yacht that require the B1/B2 Visa. With the paperwork and our STCW-Training you have a very high chance of being granted the US B1/B2 visa.

B1/B2 Visa to work on yachts 2024 –  How long does the US B1/B2 Visa Application take for Yacht Crew ?

This varies depending on where you submit your application and interview. It can take 1 week to several months to book the interview, you can see at the US embassy website for available appointments to book when doing the online application. A good trick is to update and check frequently, because when someone cancels an appointment it becomes available in the calendar and you can get the appointment within just a few days or weeks notice for a B1/B2 Visa to work on yachts 2024.

 How many years is the US B1/B2 visa valid for working on Yachts?

If you are showing the correct paperwork from an employer or with the help of Yachtiecareers, the US B1/B2 Visa is generally issued for a period of 5 or 10 years. This varies depending on the embassy official officer and also in which country you do the application.

B1/B2 Visa to work on yachts 2024 – Conclusion

It is possible to get through a US B1/B2 application or by simply joining the Yachtiecareers Yacht crew training to start working on yachts.

To become a Yacht Stewardess and get all STCW Basic Safety Training, Visas, Yacht CV and Seaman’s Discharge book you can book your training here: Yacht Stewardess Training

To become a Yacht Deckhand and get all STCW Basic Safety Training, Visas, Yacht CV and Seaman’s Discharge book you can book your training here:

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IMAGES

  1. B1/B2 Visas for superyacht crew

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  2. Everything Superyacht Crew Need to Know about the B1/B2 Visa

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  3. B1B2 Visa

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  4. Get your B1B2 visas for crew

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  5. Get your B1B2 Visa NOW and start your journey tomorrow

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  6. B1B2 Visas for Yacht Crew: How to Get Approved?

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COMMENTS

  1. Everything Superyacht Crew Need to Know about the B1/B2 Visa

    The B1/B2 visa is the primary visa that all non-U.S. yacht crew will need when they're traveling to the U.S. Specifically, it's a non-immigrant visa that allows the holder to temporarily enter the U.S. either for business (B1) or tourism (B2). Yacht crew generally will receive a combination B1/B2 visa that allows you to do both and the visa ...

  2. B1/B2 Visas for superyacht crew

    What is a B1/B2 visa? This visa allows the holder to temporarily enter the U.S. either for business (B1) or tourism (B2). Usually, yacht crew are issued a combination of B1/B2 visa that allows the holder to travel to the U.S. for periods of up to 6 months at time and can be valid up to a period of 10 years.

  3. All about yacht crew Schengen visa & B1 B2 visa

    Stamping In and Out of a boat. A formal procedure that allows yacht crew members to "Stamp out" of the EU zone and into the vessel flag. That means the Schengen visa days do not count as long as the crew is on the boat crew list. Now, to the experts. We asked, Bruno Padula, Crew formalities expert from Luise Yachting agency, based in Naples.

  4. Why You Need a B1/B2 Visa To Work on Boats In The US & Caribbean

    The B1B2 is a multi-entry visa that is considered the most appropriate visa for superyacht crew by the US embassy. This is where it gets confusing! According to the US Department of State, the B1B2 is classified as a visitor visa. This means that it is a non-immigrant visa for people wishing to enter the United States temporarily.

  5. Getting to the Bottom of the B1B2 Visa for Yacht Crew

    The B1B2, though it is the most appropriate for crew working (or looking for work) on yachts, was in no way created for that purpose. According to the US Department of State, the B1B2 is classified as a visitor visa. This means that it is a non-immigrant visa for people wishing to enter the United States temporarily.

  6. Superyacht Crew Visa's Explained

    The visa can be obtained by presenting the same paperwork are the type C visa. B1/B2 Visa. The USA is a megabase for the superyacht industry. By its very nature, it draws hundreds of young and aspiring superyacht crew, looking for work and adventure on the high seas.

  7. B1B2 Visa

    The uk.usembassy.gov website states if working on a private yacht sailing out of a foreign port and cruising in US waters for more than 29 days will need a B-1 visa. Generally, B-1 is for business, B-2 for tourism or B1/B2 for a combination of both and this is the one to get for yacht crew, even if just delivering a boat before flying home.

  8. Yacht Crew Agency Blog

    For US citizens, the most common visa required for working on a superyacht is the B1/B2 visa. This is a combination visitor/business visa that allows you to enter the US for up to six months for the purpose of working on a yacht. ... To be eligible, you must have a job offer from a yacht owner or crew placement agency and be able to show that ...

  9. What you need to know about US Visa B1 or B2

    According to the U.S. Department of State, in order to apply for the B1/B2 visa, follow these steps: 1. File the online visa application. You will need to complete the "DS-160" form and you will receive a 10-digit application ID and barcode. Keep these details and print out the barcode prior to the interview.

  10. A Primer on U.S Visas for Foreign Yacht Crew

    Eliot Norman is a partner in the Immigration Practice Group at Williams Mullen, a full-service corporate law firm. He regularly advises yacht owners and management companies on visa rules for foreign crew. For more information: [email protected]. 804.420.6482. A Primer on U.S Visas for Foreign Yacht Crew.

  11. Crewmember Visa

    You do not qualify for a Crewmember Visa if: You may be able to apply for the following visa category: Dry Dock: The primary services you will perform are dry dock repairs under warranty while the boat is docked at a U.S. port. B-1. Fishing Vessel: You are a crewmember on a temporary basis on a fishing vessel that has a home port or operating base in the United States.

  12. Unmasking the Truth: What's the deal with B1B2 Visas?

    Yes is the simple answer. Interestingly, it's legal for crew to look for work while they are on holiday in the U.S., "Provided your primary reason for entering [the U.S.] was other than looking for work," according to Norman. So crew lawfully in the U.S. in tourist status, whether carrying a 90-day visa waiver or a B1/B2 visa with an I-94 ...

  13. Visa's & Documentation for Yacht Crew

    Find a Visa Application Service to Assist You. B1/B2 Visa (USA): This visa is crucial if you are a non-American crew member applying for positions on International flagged vessels cruising in the US waters. The visa can be valid anywhere from 1-10 years, depending on your situation and nationality.

  14. Get your B1B2 visas for crew

    By EVOLUTION Yacht Agents inNewsletters Tag Concierge. Although times are still uncertain, many vessels are preparing for a Caribbean season and therefore needing B1B2 visas for their crew. Even prior to COVID, there are many horror stories out there of visa refusals, mostly due the lack of information and preparation prior to their interview ...

  15. Visas You Need Working On A Superyacht

    A Yacht Crew Visa, also known as a B1/B2 visa, is required for non-U.S. citizens who wish to work on a Superyacht that will be traveling to or within the United States and Caribbean (Not legally, but required sometimes by the Yacht). Canada Passport and US Passport holders do not need a B1/B2. Below is other types of visas for working on board.

  16. Visa For Yacht Crew (Top 3)

    The B1/B2 visa application is filled out at the US embassy website and nowhere else. If you are new yacht crew or have joined Yachtiecareers you need to follow these simple steps to get a US B1/B2 Visa. Join Yachtiecareers for free and fill in your online profile here. Complete your US B1/B1 visa application form with one of our Instructors.

  17. What Visa Do You Need To Work On Superyachts?

    Here are 3 visa's to consider for the yachting seasons: B1/B2 Visa (Caribbean and US Season) This is a multi-entry visa for yacht crew to work onboard superyachts cruising the US ((including US Waters). For the Caribbean yachting season, most yachts cruise in US waters so if you're not a US Citizen you'll most likely need a B1/B2 visa.

  18. Inconsistencies with issuing of US visas to yacht crew continue

    Some of the following items were included in the points raised: • Consular offices have often refused to issue both C1/D and B1/B2 visas to foreign yacht crew. Once they find out that a foreign-flagged yacht offering employment to a crewmember has been offered for charter in the past, they refuse to issue a B1/B2 and sometimes none at all.

  19. Yacht Crew

    Many foreign flagged yachts will only hire non-American crew if they hold a B1/B2 visa for the United States. A C1-D visa is not appropriate for private yacht crew. If you do not have a B1/B2 visa a Captain may be willing to hire you on the condition that you are prepared to obtain the visa, then you can apply for the visa using boat documents. ...

  20. Yacht Jobs

    B1/B2. This is a specific, non-immigration visa which is essential for any potential crew to hold if they wish to work on a luxury yacht which is either US Flagged Yacht and/or enters US waters. B1 Visa = Visitor for Business. B2 Visa = Visitor for Pleasure.

  21. B1B2 Visas for Yacht Crew: How to Get Approved?

    B1B2 visas for yacht crew are available for those who meet the necessary requirements. The process is relatively simple and straightforward, and can be completed in a relatively short period of time. With the proper documentation and the correct application, there is no reason why an individual should not be able to obtain a B1B2 visa for yacht ...

  22. Get your B1B2 Visa NOW and start your journey tomorrow

    For many years Evolution has been offering assistance to yacht crew needing B1B2 visas.In the pre-COVID era, our team pretty much exclusively assisted yachts based in Spain to process applications at the US Embassy in Madrid as soon as cruising US waters was confirmed for the clients´ upcoming season. This meant usually in August or September we would have a flurry of requests and would ...

  23. B1/B2 Visa To Work On Yachts 2024 -Yachtiecareers

    You first need to make sure you have all the required training and certification to become yacht crew and join a Yacht with Yachtiecaareers as a Deckhand or Stewardess. Step 1 - Select your training package. Step 2 - Complete the STCW Basic Safety Training week. Step 3 - We write your new Yacht CV. Step 4 - We apply for the B1/B2 Visa.