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  • Artists - J
  • Jim Stafford Lyrics
  • The Ultimate Jim Stafford Album
  • Wildwood Weed Lyrics

Jim Stafford - Wildwood Weed Lyrics

Artist: Jim Stafford

Album: The Ultimate Jim Stafford

take a trip never leave the farm

The wildwood flower grew wild on the farm, And we never knowed what it was called. Some said it was a flower and some said it was weed, I never gave it much thought ... One day I was out there talking to my brother, Reached down for a weed to chew on, Things got fuzzy and things got blurry, And then everything was gone! Didnt know what happened, But I knew it beat the hell out of sniffin burlap. I come to and my brother was there, And he said, Whats wrong with your eyes? I said, I dont know, I was chewing on a weed. He said, Let me give it a try. We spent the rest of that day and most of that night, Trying to find my brother, Bill. Caught up with him, bout six oclock the next morning, Naked, swinging on the wind mill! He said he flew up there. I had to fly up there and bring him down, He was about half crazy ... The very next day we picked a bunch of them weeds, And put em in the sun to dry. Then we mashed em up and chopped em up, And put em in the corncob pipe. Smokin that wildwood flower got to be a habit, We didnt see no harm. We thought it was kind of handy, Take a trip and never leave the farm! All good things gotta come to an end, And its the same with the wildwood weed. One day this feller from Washington came by, And he spied it and turned white as a sheet. Then they dug and they burned, And they burned and they dug, And they killed all our cute little weeds. Then they drove away, We just smiled and waved ... Sittin there on that sack of seeds! Y'all come back now, hear?

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take a trip never leave the farm

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Wildwood Weed

  • Jim Stafford

Lyrics submitted by ax2groin

Wildwood Weed Lyrics as written by Jim Stafford Don Bowman

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take a trip never leave the farm

Country folks always knew how to have fun, (ie moonshine, wildwood weed, and good lookin' girls) it's city folks that mess things up for us.

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Awesome song. and obviously about weed

Discovery of Pot/Weed, its an oldie tho, from 70's i think. wash rong wi yourn eyes?

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take a trip never leave the farm

Jim Stafford – The Wildwood Flower lyrics

The wildwood flower grew wild on the farm, And we never knowed what it was called. Some said it was a flower and some said it was weed, I never gave it much thought ...... One day I was out there talking to my brother, Reached down for a weed to chew on, Things got fuzzy and things got blurry, And then everything was gone! Didn't know what happened, But I knew it beat the hell out of sniffin' burlap.

I come to and my brother was there, And he said, What's wrong with your eyes? I said, I don't know, I was chewing on a weed. He said, Let me give it a try. We spent the rest of that day and most of that night, Trying to find my brother, Bill. Caught up with him, 'bout six o'clock the next morning, Naked, swinging on the wind mill! He said he flew up there. I had to fly up there and bring him down, He was about half crazy .....

The very next day we picked a bunch of them weeds, And put 'em in the sun to dry. Then we mashed 'em up and chopped 'em up, And put 'em in the corncob pipe. Smokin' that wildwood flower got to be a habit, We didn't see no harm. We thought it was kind of handy, Take a trip and never leave the farm!

All good things gotta come to an end, And it's the same with the wildwood weed. One day this feller from Washington came by, And he spied it and turned white as a sheet. Then they dug and they burned, And they burned and they dug, And they killed all our cute little weeds. Then they drove away, We just smiled and waved .......... Sittin' there on that sack of seeds!

Y'all come back now, hear?

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take a trip never leave the farm

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Take a Trip and Never Leave the Farm

Ever dream of scaling a wall of signals from some exotic QTH, but thoughts of braving weather, bugs, travel sickness and expense hold you back? This year you can turn your dreams into reality! The title of this article, a line from a 1970s American top 40 hit, pretty well sums up my experience as a Vermont W1AW/1 CW operator in the ARRL Centennial QSO Party.

A small, rural state with few dyed-in-the-wool CW operators, Vermont's gritty topography resembles nothing so much as a lossy pair of corduroy pants that make radiation beyond our borders a serious challenge. Combining those factors with a singular call sign attracting worldwide attention produced activity that prompted this post to the DX Summit web cluster:

N6KZ 7034.5 W1AW/1 ARRL Cent-VT like FT5 pileup! 0415 28 Mar

Too right, Jim!

Now, this wasn't my first rodeo. I'm accustomed to making up to 2,000 CW contacts or 5,000 phone contacts during a two-day DX contest. But here we're talking more than 3,000 CW contacts in a little over 22 hours of operating time over the first three days of the event. That's a running rate of almost 140 CW contacts per hour - a complete QSO every 26 seconds - on average e. The peak QSO count for a single hour was 158!

Having now been on the "business end" of a CW pileup that spread a few kHz up the band, I'd like to pass along a couple of hints to others who will take up the W1AW/n gauntlet:

Be patient with yourself , remain calm and don't freak out, regardless of what happens. If it isn't fun, you may not want to stay with it. Your skills will improve hourly and daily, but may also wane with fatigue and challenging band conditions.

Find a nearby mentor, preferably an experienced DXpedition or contest operator who is accomplished in your mode of choice, for guidance and moral support before and during the event.

Practice your copying and logging skills and fine-tune your radio configuration by listening to other W1AW/n stations. I found it essential to turn off my receiver's AGC and widen my IF passband. Otherwise, all I heard in the headphones was a stew of sound from which I could not pick out a single call.

Be loud! It's difficult to control the behavior of callers in a pileup if they can't hear you clearly. Don't be afraid to send a long string of "dits" to get the pileup's attention and let them know you need orderly behavior to work down the backlog of callers.

Encourage fellow operators in your state to be active on the same mode at the same time. This will spread out the pileup action, relieving the pressures on operators and callers, alike.

To those who ask whether pileup courtesy is dead, I could cite examples of numerous hams standing by to give a particular DX region an opportunity to work us in a small propagation window, and my QRT signoff was always met with anonymous "73s", "dit-dits" and "TUs". I encountered very few examples of "constant caller syndrome" and I want to thank all who called for helping me to work through the pileups in good order.

So let me sound the call to action: when W1AW/n comes to your state, embrace the opportunity to walk a mile in the shoes of a DXpedition! Not only will you be a better operator afterwards, but you'll have a better appreciation for the challenges DX operators face and the satisfaction they enjoy.

73 - Brian K1LI

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Jim Stafford – Wildwood Weed lyrics

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[May 2007] Because of the Hardy Boys, I went to Greece.

When I was a young reader, I devoured the Franklin W. Dixon books. The local librarian peered down her nose at me when I checked them out. Her sighs betrayed her belief that they were only on the shelves because the library couldn’t afford anything better. She deemed them junk food, long before anyone used that term.

One of the later books in the series, The Shattered Helmet , was set partly in Greece and the foreign setting fascinated me. Several years later, when my high school history and art teachers announced they were arranging a spring break trip to Greece in 1978, the resonance from that book returned to me. I set about trying to convince my parents I should go. To my delight and surprise, they didn’t take much convincing. Though we weren’t exactly rich, they had traveled overseas for the first time a few years earlier and had an appreciation for the potential benefits.

The trip did not disappoint—everything exotic I believed about Greece based on The Shattered Helmet was borne out by reality, and then some.

Over the years since then, I’ve traveled extensively—Australia, Hong Kong, Venezuela, Hawaii, the Caribbean, all over Europe—and I lived in Switzerland for a couple of years. Most of my journeys took place before I started writing, though. I have photographs and memories of those locations, but when I visited I wasn’t looking with a writer’s eye for detail.

Two days from now, I’m leaving for Japan. I’m spending the better part of a week in Tokyo and Osaka. It’s my fourth or fifth trip to that country, but my first since I began writing. I’m excited about the possibility of gathering local color for a story I might set there some day. I have an idea already—I’ve had a research file about hikikomori on my memory stick for over a year. This trip might help kick start that story.

When I travel these days, I take a recording device so I can preserve intriguing details as I encounter them. For Japan, it’ll be a camera and a digital voice recorder. The country is so high tech that if I’m seen muttering into my hand I won’t look crazy. Video cameras are great tools for recording impressions that you can revisit over and over again later, observing new details—new sights and sounds—to dab into your fictions.

I’ve set tales in Australia, Hong Kong and Canada and have traveled around Texas to capture settings for stories and novels. I like getting details right. Nothing annoys me more than reading a book or watching a film set in a familiar location to discover they’ve bollixed it up. I remember an episode of a TV show where the cast went to Paris. Between the airport and their hotel, the taxi passed every famous site in the city. Boy, did they ever get taken for a ride. Readers of The Da Vinci Code familiar with Paris will suspect that Dan Brown never visited there before writing the book, too.

Stephen King said that one of the barriers to writing Cell , even though he had the inspiration for the novel several years earlier, was that he originally planned to set it in Manhattan but didn’t know the city well enough. He anticipated all the letters he would get if his characters left town via routes anyone familiar with the city would never use. Readers are quick to let you know when you get it wrong—witness the Dark Tower fans who knew the A Train didn’t go to the station where Odetta lost her legs. When King relocated the story to a more familiar place—Boston— Cell took off for him.

Books possess the power to allow readers to—in the words of Jim Stafford—take a trip and never leave the farm. The setting can be as crucial to the story as the characters. Sometimes the locale is exotic—a Greek island or Jerusalem, as in Graham Joyce’s House of Lost Dreams and Requiem —or simply foreign (to many of us), as in Ian Rankin’s Edinburgh novels and Colin Dexter’s detective stories set in Oxford. One reason I enjoy David Lindsey’s crime novels is because they are usually set in Houston or other parts of Texas familiar to me.

These writers have intimate knowledge of their settings, either because they’ve lived there or spent considerable time visiting the locations.

We make things up all the time. We create people who never lived and put them through ordeals that never happened. Why not simply make up locations? That’s certainly an option. Science fiction writers do it all the time, and some authors create fictional towns where they can establish the geography as they go along. Ed McBain’s fictional Isola is a Manhattan clone, but he doesn’t have to be slavishly faithful to a real place.

There are advantages to using real locations. Every city and town brings with it history and geography you can use as an anchor for your story. You don’t have to make up as much when you use a real place, and the closer a lie is to the truth the more believable it becomes.

When it comes to setting, though, all the stay-at-home research in the world won’t provide sufficient insight into a place you’ve never visited to convince readers you know it. The little things get you, details so self-evident no one ever bothers to mention them.

A while back, I set a novel in a small West Texas city. I looked at maps and satellite images, read newspapers and travel journals. Pored over photographs and read guidebooks. I thought I had the place down cold—until I went there and discovered that what appears on maps to be the main street is actually an eastbound one-way thoroughfare. The westbound street is a block north. Something so fundamental to the geography eluded my extensive research. If I had staged a head-on car accident on that street, anyone who’d ever been there would know I hadn’t.

Neither did I appreciate the impact the Amtrak train has on the town when it rolls through every afternoon, closing gates at level crossings and backing up traffic, or from how far away you can hear the whistles blow when the freight trains pass by late at night. Or the way the mountains are visible no matter which way you look, dominating the horizon the same way the Eiffel Tower dominates Paris. I now have hours of video from a camera that I mounted on the dashboard of the car as I drove around, making observations to myself for future reference.

Unless you go to a mill town, you don’t appreciate how noxious smells permeate everything on days when the wind blows in certain directions. Spring Garden Road in Halifax looks perfectly flat on a map, but when you walk up it from Barrington Street toward the university, you discover that its gentle incline can sap your strength, especially on a brisk winter day. If you write a story set in downtown Houston on a Saturday afternoon and populate it with throngs of pedestrians, people who’ve been there will shake their heads, because you can shoot a canon ball down the sidewalk on a hot weekend afternoon and endanger no one. Even the Subway restaurant is closed.

I have cheated in the past—I had to set a story in Prague recently, so I did the research, made sure I included a handful of details to create local color, and kept as much of the plot indoors as possible to avoid egregious errors. Besides, it was a science fiction story set in the near future, so I could hand wave and make things up if I didn’t know them.

When you get location settings right , though, people familiar with your setting will nod and say, “That’s it. Exactly.” You create a connection with them. We’re members of the same club.

Other readers are our armchair tourists and we’re the virtual travel guides, showing them places they might never get to visit, or perhaps inspiring them—like I was inspired as a teenager—to want to visit these locations.

It’s an awesome power, don’t you think?

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Bev Vincent is the author of Stephen King: A Complete Exploration of His Work, Life and Influences , The Dark Tower Companion , The Road to the Dark Tower , nominated for a Bram Stoker Award, and The Stephen King Illustrated Companion , nominated for a 2010 Edgar® Award and a 2009 Bram Stoker Award. In 2018, he co-edited the anthology Flight or Fright with Stephen King.

His short fiction has appeared in places like Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine , Alfred Hitchcock's Mystery Magazine , Borderlands 5 , Ice Cold , and The Blue Religion . Four of his stories were collected in When the Night Comes Down and another four in a CD Select eBook . His story "The Bank Job" won the Al Blanchard Award. "The Honey Trap" from Ice Cold was nominated for an ITW Thriller Award in 2015 and "Zombies on a Plane" was nominated for an Ignotus Award in 2020.

His non-fiction has appeared in diverse magazines, including The Poetry Foundation , Fangoria , Rue Morgue , Screem , Pensacola Magazine and Texas Gardener . He has been a contributing editor with Cemetery Dance magazine since 2001 and is a former member of the Storytellers Unplugged blogging community. He also writes book reviews for Onyx Reviews . He has served as a judge for the Al Blanchard, Shirley Jackson and Edgar Awards.

His work has been translated into: Arabic, Bulgarian, Chinese, Croatian, Czech, Dutch, French, German, Greek, HItalian, Japanese, Korean, Polish, Portuguese, Russian, Swedish, Serbian, Spanish, Turkish and Ukrainian

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Wildwood Weed

Jim stafford , ray stevens.

take a trip never leave the farm

About Wildwood Weed

"Wildwood Weed" is a 1974 hit song written by Don Bowman and recorded by Jim Stafford. It was the fourth of four U. S. Top 40 singles from his eponymous debut album. Musically, the song takes its inspiration from The Carter Family's instrumental recording "Wildwood Flower". The lyrics in the verses are spoken, rather than sung. The song is a story about farmers who take a sudden interest in a common wildflower on their farm, and soon discover and enjoy its hallucinogenic and mind-altering properties after one of them begins to chew on one. They begin to cultivate the plant in earnest, however, federal agents raid their property and destroy their crop. Nevertheless, the men are undeterred by the destruction of their plants as they have saved a supply of seeds which was overlooked by the agents. "Wildwood Weed" reached number seven on the U. S. Billboard Hot 100, number five on Cash Box and number three on the Canadian pop singles chart. It was a crossover hit onto the Adult Contemporary charts of both nations (reaching number two in Canada), as well as the U. S. Country chart.   more »

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take a trip never leave the farm

Jim Stafford

James Wayne "Jim" Stafford (born January 16, 1944, Eloise, Florida) is an American comedian, musician, and singer-songwriter. While prominent in the 1970s for his records "Spiders and Snakes", "Swamp Witch", and "My Girl Bill", Stafford has headlined at his own theater in Branson, Missouri since 1990. Stafford is self-taught on guitar, fiddle, piano, banjo, organ and harmonica. more »

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Written by: DON BOWMAN, JIM STAFFORD

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"Wildwood Weed Lyrics." Lyrics.com. STANDS4 LLC, 2024. Web. 23 Jan. 2024. < https://www.lyrics.com/lyric/874311/Jim+Stafford/Wildwood+Weed >.

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Missing lyrics by Jim Stafford?

Know any other songs by jim stafford don't keep it to yourself, image credit, the web's largest resource for, music, songs & lyrics, a member of the stands4 network, top hot 100 songs 1974, billboard #7, more tracks from the album, ray stevens/jim stafford.

take a trip never leave the farm

  • #1 Ahab the Arab
  • #2 Harry the Hairy Ape
  • #5 The Streak
  • #6 Spiders and Snakes
  • #7 Wildwood Weed
  • #8 My Girl Bill
  • #9 Your Bulldog Drinks Champagne

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take a trip never leave the farm

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COMMENTS

  1. Wildwood Weed (Jim Stafford) w/ lyrics

    31K 2.6M views 11 years ago This funny song was released by country comedian Jim Stafford in 1974. The song pokes fun at the classic country/bluegrass hit "Wildwood Flower" while telling the story...

  2. Jim Stafford

    Wildwood Weed Lyrics The name of this song is the Wildwood Flower Now the Wildwood Flower is an old country classic It's gained a whole new popularity The song isn't any more popular But the...

  3. Wildwood Weed

    Provided to YouTube by Universal Music GroupWildwood Weed · Jim StaffordJim Stafford℗ 1974 Mercury RecordsReleased on: 1974-01-01Producer: LoboProducer: Phil...

  4. Wildwood Weeds Lyrics

    Take a trip and never leave the farm! (Big ol' puff of the Wildwood Weed, next thing you know, you're just wandering around behind the little animals.) All good things gotta come to an end, And it's the same with the wildwood weeds. One day this feller from Washington came by, And he spied 'em and turned white as a sheet.

  5. JIM STAFFORD

    Take a trip and never leave the farm! All good things gotta come to an end, And its the same with the wildwood weed. One day this feller from Washington came by, And he spied it and turned white as a sheet. Then they dug and they burned, And they burned and they dug, And they killed all our cute little weeds. Then they drove away,

  6. Jim Stafford

    Take a trip and never leave the farm They go puff that Wildwood Weed, next thing you know You just wanderin' around behind the little animals All good things gotta come to an end

  7. Jim Stafford

    "Wildwood Weed" is a 1974 hit song written by Don Bowman and recorded by Jim Stafford. It was the fourth of four U. S. Top 40 singles from his eponymous debut album. Musically, the song takes its inspiration from The Carter Family's instrumental recording "Wildwood Flower". The lyrics in the verses are spoken, rather than sung.

  8. Jim Stafford

    Take a trip and never leave the farm! All good things gotta come to an end, And it's the same with the wildwood weed. One day this feller from Washington came by, And he spied it and turned white as a sheet. Then they dug and they burned, And they burned and they dug, And they killed all our cute little weeds.

  9. Wildwood Weed by Jim Stafford

    Take a trip and never leave the farm! (Big ol' puff of the Wildwood Weed, next thing you know, you're just wandering around behind the little animals.) All good things gotta come to an end, And it's the same with the wildwood weeds. One day this feller from Washington came by, And he spied 'em and turned white as a sheet. Well, they dug and ...

  10. Take a Trip and Never Leave the Farm

    Take a Trip and Never Leave the Farm. Ever dream of scaling a wall of signals from some exotic QTH, but thoughts of braving weather, bugs, travel sickness and expense hold you back? This year you can turn your dreams into reality! The title of this article, a line from a 1970s American top 40 hit, pretty well sums up my experience as a Vermont ...

  11. Touring in my Gameroom: "Take a trip and never leave the farm!"

    The classic "Touring" card game was published continually for over 60 years. Invented in 1906, it followed the rise of the automobile in popularity. By 1924,...

  12. Wildwood Weed lyrics

    Take a trip and never leave the farm. A big ol' puff on the wildwood weed Next thing you know We's just wandering behind the little animals All good things gotta come to an end And it's the same with the wildwood weed. One day this feller from Washington come by And he spied us and he turned white as a sheet And he dug and he burned And he ...

  13. Jim Stafford

    We never seen no harm We thought it was kind-a handy Take a trip and never leave the farm Big 'ole puff of that wildwood weed next thing you know You're just wand'ring 'round behind the little animals All good things got to come to an end It's the same with the wildwood weeds One day this feller from Washington come by

  14. Jim Stafford

    Take a trip and never leave the farm Big 'ole puff of that wildwood weed next thing you know You're just wand'ring 'round behind the little animals All good things got to come to an end It's the same with the wildwood weeds

  15. Wildwood Weed Lyrics by Jim Stafford

    We never seen no harm We thought it was kind-a handy Take a trip and never leave the farm Big 'ole puff of that wildwood weed next thing you know You're just wand'ring 'round behind the little animals All good things got to come to an end It's the same with the wildwood weeds One day this feller from Washington come by

  16. Jim Stafford

    The song is a story about farmers who take a sudden interest in a common wildflower on their farm, and soon discover and enjoy its hallucinogenic and mind-altering properties after one of them begins to chew on one. more » Year: 1992 2:38 6,636 Views Playlists: #34 Become A Better Singer In Only 30 Days, With Easy Video Lessons!

  17. Wildwood Weed Lyrics by Jim Stafford

    Jim Stafford Lyrics Wildwood Weed Lyrics The wildwood flower grew wild on the farm, And we never knowed what it was called. Some said it was a flower and some said it was weed, I never gave it much thought One day I was out there talking to my brother, Reached down for a weed to chew on, Things got fuzzy and things got blurry,

  18. Take a trip and never leave the farm Spring 2021

    March 24, 2021. "Take a trip and never leave the farm," had a whole other meaning in the '70s than it does today. There was no internet back when Jim Stafford was singing Wildwood Weed on the radio. With modern technology, farmers can conform to COVID-19 travel restrictions and attend meetings, seminars, and other events without leaving ...

  19. Take a trip—and never leave the farm

    When King relocated the story to a more familiar place—Boston— Cell took off for him. Books possess the power to allow readers to—in the words of Jim Stafford—take a trip and never leave the farm. The setting can be as crucial to the story as the characters. Sometimes the locale is exotic—a Greek island or Jerusalem, as in Graham ...

  20. Took A Trip & Never Left The Farm

    SUBSCRIBE to see more, and follow along on the journey I'm taking**SOMETIMES I CUSS A LOT OF THE TIME**Using links in your arguments is the mark of an idiot....

  21. WILDWOOD WEED Lyrics

    We never seen no harm We thought it was kind-a handy Take a trip and never leave the farm Big 'ole puff of that wildwood weed next thing you know You're just wand'ring 'round behind the little animals All good things got to come to an end It's the same with the wildwood weeds One day this feller from Washington come by

  22. SINULOG 2024: A SPECIAL LIVE COVERAGE

    NOW LIVE: Don't miss out the fun from the Sinulog sa Sugbo Philippines 2024 with CDN Digital as we bring you the latest updates of the grand day here in...

  23. Take a trip and never leave the Farm...

    © 2023 Google LLC Almost 6 minutes of scenes and wonders captured from the Sleepy Dog Observatory.Enjoy!

  24. Tampa Bay, Florida news

    Powered by the Tampa Bay Times, tampabay.com is your home for breaking news you can trust. Set us as your home page and never miss the news that matters to you.

  25. Jim Stafford

    The song is a story about farmers who take a sudden interest in a common wildflower on their farm, and soon discover and enjoy its hallucinogenic and mind-altering properties after one of them begins to chew on one. more » Year: 1992 2:38 7,626 Views Playlists: #37 The easy, fast & fun way to learn how to sing: 30DaySinger.com