Developers Guide to Active Travel Zone Assessment

Developers Guide to Active Travel Zone Assessment

  • 11 th August 2022

'Healthy Streets' and 'Active Travel Zone' are familiar buzz words in the planning process, but conducting a full ATZ assessment to TfL guidelines can often be seen as an onerous and expensive task. The below guide assists with conducting an Active Travel Zone Assessment in a cost effective way.

Active travel plays a key role in the planning decision making process. In London, accommodating pedestrians from all walks of life and choosing walking, cycle and public transport are key indicators of the Healthy Streets Approach.   The   Mayer Brown Ltd  ‘Developers Guide to Active Travel Zone Assessment’ offers a cost effective approach to auditing key routes for active travel to provide targeted streetscape improvements for development planning.

Developers guide to active travel zone assessments written over image of commuters on a London bridge

We have extensive experience in conducting both high level and full ATZ assessments so please get in touch with us by filling our our contact form or calling 01483 750508.

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Active Travel England set to become Statutory Planning Consultee from 1st June 2023

10 May 2023

active travel zone assessment

In July 2020 the Government published ‘Gear Change: A bold vision for cycling and walking’.  Within this paper the Government set out a clear vision for England’s Transport System:

“Places will be truly walkable. A travel revolution in our streets, towns and communities will have made cycling a mass form of transit. Cycling and walking will be the natural first choice for many journeys with half of all journeys in towns and cities being cycled or walked by 2030.”

The aim of this vision is to address some of the most challenging issues we face as a society – improving air quality, combatting climate change, improving health and wellbeing, addressing inequalities and tackling congestion on our roads.

To achieve this vision, the Government recognised that we need to ensure that active travel is embedded in wider policy making. In order to do this they have set up a new commissioning body and inspectorate called Active Travel England. Active Travel England’s role includes the following:

  • Holding the budget for new schemes;
  • Inspecting and approving schemes;
  • Training, good practice and knowledge sharing;
  • Inspecting highway authorities; and
  • Reviewing major planning applications.

Which developments will be effected?

From 1st June 2023, Active Travel England will become a statutory consultee on all planning applications above certain thresholds. These thresholds are:

  • 150 dwellings or more;
  • Mixed-use or commercial developments with a floor space of 7,500sq.m or more; or
  • Where the overall area of the development is 5 hectares or more.

The requirement for considering, integrating and prioritising walking and cycling needs as part of new development layouts and the local area will become more and more important in the coming years, as the government strives to achieve its net-zero targets by 2050.

Whilst Active Travel England will only be required to comment on developments meeting or exceeding the above thresholds, Local Highway Authorities are expected to put a greater emphasis on the prioritisation of active travel when commenting on all developments.

What will these changes mean for developers?

The upcoming change in legislation will mean that developers will need to ensure that their development prioritises Active Travel inside and out. Above all, developments will need to be planned and designed in accordance with the latest guidance documents, including LTN 1/20 (Cycle Infrastructure Design), which states that routes need to be:

  • Comfortable; and
  • Attractive.

In addition to these 5 core design principles every scheme will need to be inclusive and accessible to all, particularly vulnerable road users, and receive support from the local community.

Active Travel England (ATE), as consultee, may ask for plans demonstrating how these core design principles will be achieved. For larger developments, a specialist Active Travel assessment document may also be requested, to explain to ATE how the development achieves these principles.

LTN 1/20 provides assessment tools in the form of the Cycling Level of Service (CLoS) and Junction Assessment Tool (JAT). These assessment tools, along with Active Travel Zone Assessments, Road Safety Audits and Access Audits may become standard requirements where walking and cycling infrastructure is being proposed.

At Patrick Parsons, we have undertaken dozens of Active Travel Zone Assessments for sites in London, as well as designing innovative walking and cycling routes across the country.  These have included the design of priority cycle crossings and continuous crossings at junctions, including “Dutch style” crossings.

cheltenham-highstreet-travel-plan

If you have any queries on the upcoming changes, or need assistance on future planning applications which may be affected, please get in touch .

The Town and Country Planning (Development Management Procedure)

Explanatory Memorandum To The Town And Country Planning (Development Management Procedure) (England) (Amendment) Order 2023

Cycle Infrastructure Design Local Transport Note 1/20

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ASAT_logo

Now more than ever there is an imperative for local authorities to plan for active travel in their areas.

The active streets assessment tool allows for rapid analysis of road features and characteristics in your area to support new infrastructure and street design..

active travel zone assessment

Why use active streets?

Selecting appropriate areas for different measures is challenging..

It requires access to the most reliable data possible. This is why we have developed the Active Streets Assessment Tool, using our experience in transport data and delivering analytical tools into the hands of those that need them.

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How it works

A simple, online platform..

But it includes incredible levels of detail for individual road segments on the Ordnance Survey Master Map roads network, and is available within days of signing-up.

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Inform your decisions

Start triaging your network in a matter of minutes..

The tool also includes pre-defined filters based on parameters set for active zones, cycle lanes, and segregated cycle infrastructure so you can quickly understand points of interest

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What's included

Identifying appropriate locations for new segregated cycleways, footpaths, point closures, and area-wide measures can now be undertaken quickly and effectively using the new Active Streets Assessment Tool. This tool embraces detailed network infrastructure data from Ordnance Survey Master Map, enhanced with additional datasets for individual road sections including network flow, average speeds, 85th percentile speeds, modelled congestion, and collision history.

Online access

for up to four local users (extra users available on request) with annual license renewals.

for modern web browsers and mobile devices

OS Mastermap

Based on the highly-detailed OS Mastermap Highways network

Additional datasets

added including speed limits plus detailed profiles of average and 85th percentile speeds

Modelled AADF (flow)

for roads indicating traffic levels

Daily congestion index

including separate value for AM and PM peaks

Export data selections

to local systems for further analysis and modelling

Pedestrian traffic locations

Estimation of high-pedestrian traffic locations

5 years of collision data

including separate measure for pedestrian and cyclist collision densities

Multiple filters

based on road attributes including road widths, plus many of the calculated metrics

active travel zone assessment

Birmingham City Council have used ASAT since September 2020 to help understand multiple datasets in a single tool which is then used by engineers in drawing up new schemes. It's also used with schools to help prioritise funding decisions using a scoring matrix. To find out more about how they use the tool and get inspiration for your own area, download the report here.

Watch the demonstration.

In this demonstration video data from Wokingham is used to demonstrate a number of examples of how this data can be used to effectively plan for active travel.

active travel zone assessment

£4,595 per authority, per annum with up to 4 users

active travel zone assessment

Dan Campsall

Creative Director

Dan's initial role in identifying the potential for the creation of a tool combining multiple data sources, deployed rapidly to end users, provided the initial spark for the project. His ongoing role is to provide direction to the development team in areas of design and visualisation, and to work with clients to ensure the interface is intuitive.

active travel zone assessment

Richard Owen

Project Director

With extensive experience of using and understanding the datasets, Richard provided the brief to the development team and worked extensively alongside our pioneer authorities to ensure the outputs met their requirements. He is now leading client communications including hosting demonstrations and webinars.

active travel zone assessment

Craig Smith

Data Scientist

As Agilysis' lead on reproducible analytical platforms and app development using R and Shiny, Craig has spearheaded the development of the platform. His focus has been split between ensuring the application works quickly in an online environment, whilst ensuring the data architecture is structured to allow fast deployment to new clients.

active travel zone assessment

Steve Ferris

Local Authority Contact

From the outset, Steve has worked directly with the pioneering authorities to understand their requirements and ensure the system is user-friendly and easy to understand. He is now actively engaging with potential new users and explaining how the system can be used to rapidly identify new active travel zones and corridors.

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Constraints overcome with optimised access

Considering the delivery and servicing needs of sensitive sites in and around London is a regular challenge for Motion.  As cities expand, providing adequate provision for delivery and servicing activity for new developments from the outset can help to minimise disruption and the environmental impact, such as increased congestion and noise pollution.

In one such scheme in Hillingdon, Motion supported property development company, Mackenzie Homes Limited , with transport and travel planning advice and construction traffic management.  Planning consent has been granted for the redevelopment of an industrial site to erect a part 10-storey and part 11-storey mixed-use building.  The development at 3 Viveash Close will provide 127 flats and double-height residents lounge, with public realm improvements and landscaping works.

The proposals are critically important to unlocking the full potential of the wider masterplan for the area and will provide a pedestrian link to the former Nestlé factory site in the east to the new Crossrail station and Hayes town centre.

Motion Regional Director David Lewis

According to Uzair Jahangir, Development Manager at Mackenzie Homes, “We were dealing with a very tight area for commercial access and parking.  Motion conducted swept path analysis for delivery and refuse vehicles, fire trucks and cars.  The support was essential to provide safe and efficient access for deliveries and servicing to the site.” 

Supporting active travel

An Active Travel Zone assessment on the walking and cycling infrastructure in the vicinity of the site and the scheme will contribute to public realm improvements along Viveash Close.  Motion demonstrated that the new development is in a sustainable location, providing opportunities for active travel with convenient access to amenities such as banks, supermarkets, schools, pharmacies, a post office and enhanced public transport links.

Sustainability impact:

  • Facilitating walking and cycling to reduce car use to tackle congestion and emissions
  • Encouraging car-free lifestyles and enabling residents to live active, healthier lives
  • Minimising noise and air pollution

An abridged version of this article first appeared in Issue 24 of Insight

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Home » Blog » How Will the New Active Travel Assessment Impact England?

How Will the New Active Travel Assessment Impact England?

  • March 23, 2023
  • News , Policy

Will this lead to tree-lined cycling and walking routes?

Active Travel England, the recently formed government’s executive agency responsible for making walking, wheeling, and cycling the preferred choice for everyone to get around in England, has finally published local authority active travel capability ratings.

It follows on from the government’s vision for cycling and walking set out in its 2020 strategy According to the strategy, physical inactivity alone was found to be costing the NHS up to £1bn per annum.

active travel zone assessment

To tackle these issues, a bold vision was set for half of all journeys in towns and cities to be cycled or walked by the year 2030.

The active travel capability ratings are based on an earlier self-assessment and involve English local authorities outside London. The ratings guide the initial allocation of Active Travel and Capability Funding, such as the £200 million announced last month. 

“Done well, active travel provision creates attractive, healthy places where people want to live and invest, benefiting local economies and returning very high value for money, “ says Danny Williams – CEO of Active Travel England in his foreword introducing the new local authority active travel capability ratings .

The capability ratings generated through a local authorities self-assessment focused on three areas: 1) local leadership; 2) plans; and 3) delivery record. Thus falling short in assessing how local authorities are meeting their climate change obligations and maximising opportunities for greening and concurrently cooling our towns and cities.

This is in spite of the 2020 government strategy clearly setting out the benefits of cycling and walking when it comes to combatting climate change; improving air quality and thus preventing 8,300 premature deaths each year ; as well as providing opportunities to improve green spaces and biodiversity.

active travel zone assessment

The health and environmental benefits are also recognised in the government’s latest document, the second cycling and walking investment strategy (CWIS2), which references the government’s 25-year environment plan.

With reports of government funding less than initially expected there remains a glimmer of hope that not only will half of all journeys in towns and cities be cycled or walked by the year 2030. But these activities will take place along tree-lined green and pleasant routes that will contribute to improving our health and well-being whilst making space for nature to thrive.

active travel zone assessment

Looking for Green and Blue Inspiration?

GreenBlue Urban has a wealth of examples of implementing blue and green infrastructure in the urban environment including the creation of green and leafy tree-lined cycle and walking routes:

The key is involvement in the master planning stage where GBU have supported the design and successful implementation, clearly evident at Wapping Wharf , which transformed a much-loved section of Bristol City, The design included green corridors to enhance pedestrian footfall and cycleways for active travel, allowing this area to become socially inclusive for all.

Leonard Circus is a well-documented “shared space” project with the London Borough of Hackney, the well established 11 trees planted in GBU’s ArbrSystem have proved to not only be aesthetically pleasing for passers-by on foot and bicycle but provided a welcome backdrop to market day with onsite seating for all to enjoy.

Sauchiehall Street is the pilot scheme to showcase how green infrastructure can be used to change human behaviour by challenging the dominance of vehicles in the public realm. Twenty-eight specimen trees have been planted in full  GreenBlue Urban   ArborSystems , providing strong visual segregation between vehicles and pedestrians/cyclists.

Walthamstow High Street – a multi-award-winning “Mixed-use” High Street, having achieved the Planning & Placemaking Award 2016 is now equipped for the latest phase of its history, and as the green infrastructure matures, it will be providing mitigation to climate change, both cooling and stormwater management through the healthy canopy over, for generations to come.

We would like to hear from you – Do you prefer to cycle and walk along routes lined with trees? Tell us why on social @GreenBlueUrban using#Activetravel.

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19th Edition of Global Conference on Catalysis, Chemical Engineering & Technology

Victor Mukhin

  • Scientific Program

Victor Mukhin, Speaker at Chemical Engineering Conferences

Title : Active carbons as nanoporous materials for solving of environmental problems

However, up to now, the main carriers of catalytic additives have been mineral sorbents: silica gels, alumogels. This is obviously due to the fact that they consist of pure homogeneous components SiO2 and Al2O3, respectively. It is generally known that impurities, especially the ash elements, are catalytic poisons that reduce the effectiveness of the catalyst. Therefore, carbon sorbents with 5-15% by weight of ash elements in their composition are not used in the above mentioned technologies. However, in such an important field as a gas-mask technique, carbon sorbents (active carbons) are carriers of catalytic additives, providing effective protection of a person against any types of potent poisonous substances (PPS). In ESPE “JSC "Neorganika" there has been developed the technology of unique ashless spherical carbon carrier-catalysts by the method of liquid forming of furfural copolymers with subsequent gas-vapor activation, brand PAC. Active carbons PAC have 100% qualitative characteristics of the three main properties of carbon sorbents: strength - 100%, the proportion of sorbing pores in the pore space – 100%, purity - 100% (ash content is close to zero). A particularly outstanding feature of active PAC carbons is their uniquely high mechanical compressive strength of 740 ± 40 MPa, which is 3-7 times larger than that of  such materials as granite, quartzite, electric coal, and is comparable to the value for cast iron - 400-1000 MPa. This allows the PAC to operate under severe conditions in moving and fluidized beds.  Obviously, it is time to actively develop catalysts based on PAC sorbents for oil refining, petrochemicals, gas processing and various technologies of organic synthesis.

Victor M. Mukhin was born in 1946 in the town of Orsk, Russia. In 1970 he graduated the Technological Institute in Leningrad. Victor M. Mukhin was directed to work to the scientific-industrial organization "Neorganika" (Elektrostal, Moscow region) where he is working during 47 years, at present as the head of the laboratory of carbon sorbents.     Victor M. Mukhin defended a Ph. D. thesis and a doctoral thesis at the Mendeleev University of Chemical Technology of Russia (in 1979 and 1997 accordingly). Professor of Mendeleev University of Chemical Technology of Russia. Scientific interests: production, investigation and application of active carbons, technological and ecological carbon-adsorptive processes, environmental protection, production of ecologically clean food.   

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  • Elektrostal
  • 9th radio centre of Moscow

9th radio centre of Moscow, Elektrostal

#13 among attractions in Elektrostal

9th radio centre of Moscow location map

9th radio centre of Moscow – popular in the area (distance from the attraction)

Nearby attractions include: Park otdyha, Istoriko-hudozestvennyj muzej, Vystavocnyj zal, Park otdyha.

park otdyha elektrostal location map

Park otdyha, Elektrostal

30 min walk • Amusement, Amusement park

istoriko hudozestvennyj muzej elektrostal location map

Istoriko-hudozestvennyj muzej, Elektrostal

19 min walk • Museum

vystavocnyj zal elektrostal location map

Vystavocnyj zal, Elektrostal

17 min walk • Museum

park otdyha elektrostal location map

24 min walk • Amusement, Amusement park

tc cistye materialy elektrostal location map

TC "Cistye materialy", Elektrostal

16 min walk • Shopping centre, Shopping

shopping center elektrostal location map

Shopping Center, Elektrostal

32 min walk • Shopping, Shopping centre

tc meridian elektrostal location map

TC Meridian, Elektrostal

22 min walk • Shopping, Shopping centre

The Moscow Metro Museum of Art: 10 Must-See Stations

There are few times one can claim having been on the subway all afternoon and loving it, but the Moscow Metro provides just that opportunity.  While many cities boast famous public transport systems—New York’s subway, London’s underground, San Salvador’s chicken buses—few warrant hours of exploration.  Moscow is different: Take one ride on the Metro, and you’ll find out that this network of railways can be so much more than point A to B drudgery.

The Metro began operating in 1935 with just thirteen stations, covering less than seven miles, but it has since grown into the world’s third busiest transit system ( Tokyo is first ), spanning about 200 miles and offering over 180 stops along the way.  The construction of the Metro began under Joseph Stalin’s command, and being one of the USSR’s most ambitious building projects, the iron-fisted leader instructed designers to create a place full of svet (radiance) and svetloe budushchee (a radiant future), a palace for the people and a tribute to the Mother nation.

Consequently, the Metro is among the most memorable attractions in Moscow.  The stations provide a unique collection of public art, comparable to anything the city’s galleries have to offer and providing a sense of the Soviet era, which is absent from the State National History Museum.  Even better, touring the Metro delivers palpable, experiential moments, which many of us don’t get standing in front of painting or a case of coins.

Though tours are available , discovering the Moscow Metro on your own provides a much more comprehensive, truer experience, something much less sterile than following a guide.  What better place is there to see the “real” Moscow than on mass transit: A few hours will expose you to characters and caricatures you’ll be hard-pressed to find dining near the Bolshoi Theater.  You become part of the attraction, hear it in the screech of the train, feel it as hurried commuters brush by: The Metro sucks you beneath the city and churns you into the mix.

With the recommendations of our born-and-bred Muscovite students, my wife Emma and I have just taken a self-guided tour of what some locals consider the top ten stations of the Moscow Metro. What most satisfied me about our Metro tour was the sense of adventure .  I loved following our route on the maps of the wagon walls as we circled the city, plotting out the course to the subsequent stops; having the weird sensation of being underground for nearly four hours; and discovering the next cavern of treasures, playing Indiana Jones for the afternoon, piecing together fragments of Russia’s mysterious history.  It’s the ultimate interactive museum.

Top Ten Stations (In order of appearance)

Kievskaya station.

active travel zone assessment

Kievskaya Station went public in March of 1937, the rails between it and Park Kultury Station being the first to cross the Moscow River.  Kievskaya is full of mosaics depicting aristocratic scenes of Russian life, with great cameo appearances by Lenin, Trotsky, and Stalin.  Each work has a Cyrillic title/explanation etched in the marble beneath it; however, if your Russian is rusty, you can just appreciate seeing familiar revolutionary dates like 1905 ( the Russian Revolution ) and 1917 ( the October Revolution ).

Mayakovskaya Station

Mayakovskaya Station ranks in my top three most notable Metro stations. Mayakovskaya just feels right, done Art Deco but no sense of gaudiness or pretention.  The arches are adorned with rounded chrome piping and create feeling of being in a jukebox, but the roof’s expansive mosaics of the sky are the real showstopper.  Subjects cleverly range from looking up at a high jumper, workers atop a building, spires of Orthodox cathedrals, to nimble aircraft humming by, a fleet of prop planes spelling out CCCP in the bluest of skies.

Novoslobodskaya Station

active travel zone assessment

Novoslobodskaya is the Metro’s unique stained glass station.  Each column has its own distinctive panels of colorful glass, most of them with a floral theme, some of them capturing the odd sailor, musician, artist, gardener, or stenographer in action.  The glass is framed in Art Deco metalwork, and there is the lovely aspect of discovering panels in the less frequented haunches of the hall (on the trackside, between the incoming staircases).  Novosblod is, I’ve been told, the favorite amongst out-of-town visitors.

Komsomolskaya Station

Komsomolskaya Station is one of palatial grandeur.  It seems both magnificent and obligatory, like the presidential palace of a colonial city.  The yellow ceiling has leafy, white concrete garland and a series of golden military mosaics accenting the tile mosaics of glorified Russian life.  Switching lines here, the hallway has an Alice-in-Wonderland feel, impossibly long with decorative tile walls, culminating in a very old station left in a remarkable state of disrepair, offering a really tangible glimpse behind the palace walls.

Dostoevskaya Station

active travel zone assessment

Dostoevskaya is a tribute to the late, great hero of Russian literature .  The station at first glance seems bare and unimpressive, a stark marble platform without a whiff of reassembled chips of tile.  However, two columns have eerie stone inlay collages of scenes from Dostoevsky’s work, including The Idiot , The Brothers Karamazov , and Crime and Punishment.   Then, standing at the center of the platform, the marble creates a kaleidoscope of reflections.  At the entrance, there is a large, inlay portrait of the author.

Chkalovskaya Station

Chkalovskaya does space Art Deco style (yet again).  Chrome borders all.  Passageways with curvy overhangs create the illusion of walking through the belly of a chic, new-age spacecraft.  There are two (kos)mosaics, one at each end, with planetary subjects.  Transferring here brings you above ground, where some rather elaborate metalwork is on display.  By name similarity only, I’d expected Komsolskaya Station to deliver some kosmonaut décor; instead, it was Chkalovskaya that took us up to the space station.

Elektrozavodskaya Station

active travel zone assessment

Elektrozavodskaya is full of marble reliefs of workers, men and women, laboring through the different stages of industry.  The superhuman figures are round with muscles, Hollywood fit, and seemingly undeterred by each Herculean task they respectively perform.  The station is chocked with brass, from hammer and sickle light fixtures to beautiful, angular framework up the innards of the columns.  The station’s art pieces are less clever or extravagant than others, but identifying the different stages of industry is entertaining.

Baumanskaya Statio

Baumanskaya Station is the only stop that wasn’t suggested by the students.  Pulling in, the network of statues was just too enticing: Out of half-circle depressions in the platform’s columns, the USSR’s proud and powerful labor force again flaunts its success.  Pilots, blacksmiths, politicians, and artists have all congregated, posing amongst more Art Deco framing.  At the far end, a massive Soviet flag dons the face of Lenin and banners for ’05, ’17, and ‘45.  Standing in front of the flag, you can play with the echoing roof.

Ploshchad Revolutsii Station

active travel zone assessment

Novokuznetskaya Station

Novokuznetskaya Station finishes off this tour, more or less, where it started: beautiful mosaics.  This station recalls the skyward-facing pieces from Mayakovskaya (Station #2), only with a little larger pictures in a more cramped, very trafficked area.  Due to a line of street lamps in the center of the platform, it has the atmosphere of a bustling market.  The more inventive sky scenes include a man on a ladder, women picking fruit, and a tank-dozer being craned in.  The station’s also has a handsome black-and-white stone mural.

Here is a map and a brief description of our route:

Start at (1)Kievskaya on the “ring line” (look for the squares at the bottom of the platform signs to help you navigate—the ring line is #5, brown line) and go north to Belorusskaya, make a quick switch to the Dark Green/#2 line, and go south one stop to (2)Mayakovskaya.  Backtrack to the ring line—Brown/#5—and continue north, getting off at (3)Novosblodskaya and (4)Komsolskaya.  At Komsolskaya Station, transfer to the Red/#1 line, go south for two stops to Chistye Prudy, and get on the Light Green/#10 line going north.  Take a look at (5)Dostoevskaya Station on the northern segment of Light Green/#10 line then change directions and head south to (6)Chkalovskaya, which offers a transfer to the Dark Blue/#3 line, going west, away from the city center.  Have a look (7)Elektroskaya Station before backtracking into the center of Moscow, stopping off at (8)Baumskaya, getting off the Dark Blue/#3 line at (9)Ploschad Revolyutsii.  Change to the Dark Green/#2 line and go south one stop to see (10)Novokuznetskaya Station.

Check out our new Moscow Indie Travel Guide , book a flight to Moscow and read 10 Bars with Views Worth Blowing the Budget For

Jonathon Engels, formerly a patron saint of misadventure, has been stumbling his way across cultural borders since 2005 and is currently volunteering in the mountains outside of Antigua, Guatemala.  For more of his work, visit his website and blog .

active travel zone assessment

Photo credits:   SergeyRod , all others courtesy of the author and may not be used without permission

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active travel zone assessment

  • Driving and road transport
  • Cycling and walking

Active Travel England framework document

Announces publication of a framework setting out Active Travel England's relationship with, and accountability to, the Department for Transport and Parliament.

Trudy Harrison MP

The Department for Transport is today (21 July 2022) publishing the framework document for Active Travel England . This confirms Active Travel England’s responsibilities and objectives and sets out its relationship with, and accountability to, the Department for Transport and Parliament.

Active Travel England will lead the delivery of the government’s strategy and vision for creating a new golden age of walking and cycling where half of all journeys in towns and cities are walked and cycled by 2030.

Active Travel England will hold the active travel budget in England, including for new infrastructure and behaviour change initiatives such as cycle training.

It will assess all applications for active travel capital and revenue funding, including from wider funds such as the City Region Sustainable Transport Settlements , the Levelling Up Fund and the Road Investment Strategy 2 ( RIS2 ) and award funding to schemes only if they meet the standards and principles set out in Local Transport Note 1/20 , or any later national design standards. It will also inspect new active travel infrastructure to ensure schemes meet these new standards and principles and ask for funds to be returned for any which have not been completed as promised, or not started or finished within the agreed timeframe.

Active Travel England will work with local authorities developing new schemes and support their capacity by delivering training and disseminating best practice.

ATE will also begin to inspect and publish reports on highway authorities for their performance on active travel and identify particularly dangerous failings in their highways for cyclists and pedestrians. In these regards, the commissioner and inspectorate will perform a similar role to Ofsted from the 1990s onwards in raising standards and challenging failure.

It will also act as a statutory consultee in the planning system and review active travel provision in major planning applications.

Ministers at the Department for Transport will have responsibility for Active Travel England. As an executive agency, Active Travel England will have a degree of operational independence in delivering its duties. It will be led by its chief executive officer who will be the agency’s accounting officer and report to Parliament as needed. Active Travel England will also have its own board which will be chaired by the National Active Travel Commissioner.

The framework document will come into effect when Active Travel England is formally established as an executive agency later this year and will be reviewed next year. I am placing a copy of Active Travel England’s framework document in the libraries of both Houses.

The standing up of Active Travel England is gathering pace. Today’s publication of its framework document follows last month’s announcement of senior appointments to Active Travel England . This included confirming Chris Boardman as England’s National Active Travel Commission on a permanent basis and the appointment of Danny Williams as Active Travel England’s Chief Executive.

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IMAGES

  1. Healthy Streets Assessment , Active Travel Zone, Neighbourhood

    active travel zone assessment

  2. Healthy Streets Assessment , Active Travel Zone, Neighbourhood

    active travel zone assessment

  3. Active Travel Consultation

    active travel zone assessment

  4. Infographic: Support for Active Travel Policy in Alberta

    active travel zone assessment

  5. Consultation guide: Cambridgeshire County Council Active Travel

    active travel zone assessment

  6. Active Travel Act guidance: prioritisation matrix (appendix K)

    active travel zone assessment

COMMENTS

  1. PDF ATZ Assessment Instructions

    STEP BY STEP... MAP 1 ATZ & all potential key active travel destinations Map all the potential key destinations in the ATZ around the site, which are: Public transport stops Public transport...

  2. Developers Guide to Active Travel Zone Assessment

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  3. Travel Advisories

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  4. PDF Active Travel England and Transport for London Standing Advice Note

    1.1 This standing advice relates to all applications submitted to local planning authorities in Greater London that meet the thresholds for referral to Active Travel England (ATE) under...

  5. Active travel: local authority toolkit

    Guidance Active travel: local authority toolkit Updated 10 August 2022 Applies to England Walking, wheeling and cycling are the least carbon-intensive ways to travel. However, walking...

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    Spatial Design Hub created a series of maps for Active Travel Zone Assessment for the planned new Dementia Research Institute at 256 Gray's Inn Road (Former Royal Free Hospital) following the guidelines from TfL Healthy Streets.

  8. PDF Active Travel England Standing Advice Note: Active travel and

    1. Introduction Background 1.1 This advice note has been prepared by Active Travel England (ATE), a new statutory consultee in the planning system to help support local planning authorities...

  9. PDF ATE Planning Application Assessment Toolkit: Checklist User Manual

    1. Introduction 1.1 This document has been prepared as a desktop guide for users of the Active Travel England (ATE) Planning Application Assessment Toolkit. It includes brief instructions on...

  10. Active Travel England: planning application assessment toolkit

    The planning application assessment toolkit helps to gather evidence and assess the active travel merits - walking, wheeling and cycling - of a development proposal. It should be used by...

  11. Active Travel England set to become Statutory Planning Consultee

    At Patrick Parsons, we have undertaken dozens of Active Travel Zone Assessments for sites in London, as well as designing innovative walking and cycling routes across the country. These have included the design of priority cycle crossings and continuous crossings at junctions, including "Dutch style" crossings.

  12. Active Streets Assessment Tool

    The Active Streets Assessment Tool allows for rapid analysis of road features and characteristics in your area to support new infrastructure and street design. Why use active streets? Selecting appropriate areas for different measures is challenging. It requires access to the most reliable data possible.

  13. Transport planning

    Supporting active travel. An Active Travel Zone assessment on the walking and cycling infrastructure in the vicinity of the site and the scheme will contribute to public realm improvements along Viveash Close. Motion demonstrated that the new development is in a sustainable location, providing opportunities for active travel with convenient ...

  14. Active travel

    LCWIPs will: set out an analysis of the current network and opportunities for improvements contain a network plan for walking and cycling which identifies preferred routes and core routes for...

  15. How Will the New Active Travel Assessment Impact England?

    Active Travel England, the recently formed government's executive agency responsible for making walking, wheeling, and cycling the preferred choice for everyone to get around in England, has finally published local authority active travel capability ratings. It follows on from the government's vision for cycling and walking set out in its ...

  16. Guidance note for local authorities to support completion of the active

    ensure the majority of investment is focused on authorities with high capability, defined by the authority self-assessment tier, and on schemes that can convert high volumes of journeys to...

  17. Healthy Streets

    This guide is the first tool to use in any Healthy Streets assessment. It uses questions for each of the 10 Healthy Streets indicators to help you think about the issues that affect the...

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  21. Active Travel England framework document

    Active Travel England will lead the delivery of the government's strategy and vision for creating a new golden age of walking and cycling where half of all journeys in towns and cities are ...

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    PDF | On Nov 5, 2018, Mukhin Viktor Mikhailovich and others published The Role of Active carbons in the Ecology of extraction, transportation and processing of petroleum | Find, read and cite all ...