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flying dutchman junior sailboat

$ 9,900.00

The Club FJ is a tough, agile performer for beginners to elite sailors. The Club is a fantastic choice for clubs and junior programs looking to introduce young sailors to double-handed sailing with a spinnaker. Our Collegiate version (no spinnaker) is the most popular boat in college sailing.

Please Contact Us for Availability

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clubfj 2

Introduces young sailors to double-handed sailing The Club FJ is a tough, agile performer for beginners to elite sailors. The Club is a fantastic choice for clubs and junior programs looking to introduce young sailors to double-handed sailing with a spinnaker. Our Collegiate version (no spinnaker) is the most popular boat in college sailing; more collegiate sailing teams in North America sail our FJ than any other double-handed sailboat.

The International Flying Junior or FJ is a sailing dinghy which was originally designed in 1955 in the Netherlands by renowned boat designer Van Essen and Olympic sailor Conrad Gülcher. The FJ was built to serve as a training boat for the then Olympic-class Flying Dutchman. The FJ has a beam of 4’11” and an overall sail area of 100 square feet (9.3 m 2 ). These dimensions make the FJ an ideal class to teach young sailors the skills of boat handling and racing.

The Club FJ has a Vela gray hull and deck.

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One Design Spotlight: Club Flying Junior

August 23, 2014 by Sail1Design Editor 2 Comments

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August 29, 2015 at 15:57

Who wrote this article? Its talking about two very different boats; the CFJ and the International FJ. The CFJ is widely spread on the West Coast, while the IFJ is hardly at all sailed in the US at all.

[…] living in Wisconsin…not right now, thanks). As the fanciest boat I’ve skippered is an FJ to this point, I figured on the […]

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Flying Dutchman USA

Class contact information.

Click below

Class Email

Class Website

One-Design Class Type: Dinghy

Was this boat built to be sailed by youth or adults? Adult

Approximately how many class members do you have? 40

Photo Credit:

flying dutchman junior sailboat

About Flying Dutchman USA

The Flying Dutchman is a one-design international two-person class with active sailors all over the world. It is one of the most exhilarating dinghies you will ever be in. Even after dropping the Olympic status after the 1992 Olympics, the FD Class continues to be popular for the above reasons; there are young members, but also many older sailors, which speaks to the versatility of this exceptional dinghy. The relatively large sail area can be controlled efficiently through many trim options such as a raking rig and carbon fiber spars; even lighter teams manage to race the FD successfully. There are a number of used boats available for purchase. Look up your fleet contacts in your area and try the FD!

Boats Produced:

Class boat builder(s):

Mader- BOOTSWERFT-Germany: https://www.mader-boote.de/neue-boote/flying-dutchman-fd/ Pacific Flying Dutchman (USA): [email protected]

Approximately how many boats are in the USA/North America?

Where is your One-Design class typically sailed in the USA? List regions of the country:

There are 10 regions in the US. See https://sailfdusa.org/fleets/

Does this class have a spinnaker or gennaker? Yes

How many people sail as a crew including the helm?  2

Ideal combined weight of range of crew:  330-400

Portsmouth Yardstick Rating:   82.60-75.90

Boat Designed in  1952 by Conrad Gülcher and Uus van Essen

Length (feet/inches): 20′

Beam: 5’10”

Weight of rigged boat without sails: 290

Draft: 3’6″

Mast Height: approx: 6400mm + 800mm =22.62 feet

Back to One-Design Central

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07-01-2015, 20:07  
and have been considering it. I'm a new sailor so I want some second opinions but will a flying junior be okay for a beginner? Actually three beginners?


The crash of waves and salty air are the signs of freedom
07-01-2015, 20:13  
Boat: Catalina 30

You can't buy happiness, but you can buy ribeye.
07-01-2015, 21:12  
. The biggest caveats are that they can take on a bit of in rough seas so are best suited to calmer waters unless you like that sort if thing, and since they're an older you'll need to give it a good going over and replace anything that seems suspect.

Good overall so have a blast!
07-01-2015, 21:50  
Boat: too many
08-01-2015, 08:20  
. The FJ was our family's first sailboat 50 years ago and I am still an active sailor. Moving a 46 foot Choi Lee from Tampa to this weekend. We almost the boat because we did not realize the rubber expansion discs at the end of both tight flotation compartments had dry rotted. When I capsized the boat the third or fourth time , the boat started sinking. Luckily my brother in the skiff was nearby and noticed my waving and screaming. We successfully towed the boat ashore and eventually made the necessary to those rubber discs which are about 4 or 5 inches in diameter on either side of the boat. I can't remember where exactly they are located. The boat has a planeing rather than which makes it much faster, more fun but much more unstable so just pretend you are in a canoe with a sail and you will be fine. Hold on tight and Enjoy!
SidViciousthewanderingWalrusoffedexfame
08-01-2015, 09:14  
: ) I can't wait to start sailing!


The crash of waves and salty air are the signs of freedom
08-01-2015, 09:32  
Boat: Lagoon 400
and have been considering it. I'm a new sailor so I want some second opinions but will a flying junior be okay for a beginner? Actually three beginners?
08-01-2015, 09:44  
Boat: Antares 44i
bought a used FJ to support my new passion. I sailed it on the City Reservoir in Calgary Alberta (an unlikely start!).

43 years later, after raising a family of sailors, my wife and I are planning a year of cruising, two years out, of the coast of , the , across the pond, and throughout the .

It's a good hull, a , , and . All you need to learn to the most important of sailing. I wish your fair winds and Godspeed on your adventure, and hope your entire family catches the bug!
08-01-2015, 10:03  
Boat: O'Day DaySailer 16
too and starting out on an O'Day DaySailer 3. Just waiting until spring to give a whirl! I've looked at lots of these sub-20' day sailers from different manufacturers. They all are fairly similar, most are open bow or have a small cuddy and some have a bit more than that like berths and a porta-potty. It all depends on how many people you plan to carry and what kinds of things you plan on doing with your boat.

My specs for a boat where mostly to be able to get it to the lake using our economy cars, it couldn't be very heavy. Secondly, I wanted something with two in a rig just to get the hang of this commonly used rig. When I move up in many years ahead, I'll have more of an understanding how this all works. Finally, I wanted a or at least a cuddy cabin because I would like to try camping with it. Using a boom tent expands the room the small O'Day DaySailer has in the cuddy cabin.

I think you'll do well with the Flying Junior. I'm not speaking from experience but from my for my own needs and you said you want to do this with 3 people it shouldn't be a problem for having fun on the lake during the day. There isn't much on this boat so if you want to do more or if you need to have a portapotty for the ladies then you may want to look for something a bit bigger.

From the pictures I found and some reading I've done on this boat, it seems to be used for a lot. I saw some people hiking out (hanging over the side) on this boat. This isn't something newbies are real comfortable with or for Significant Other's that are a bit nervous.

The problem with for a boat now if you are in the northern locked latitudes is that most of these small have either been or put away until spring when the seller may be able to get a better . There isn't much in this category right now. I've looked on Kajiji, Ebay, SailboatListings, CraigsList, etc. The inventory is really low right now. I bought mine in November and found a seller willing to hold it for me until spring.

Enjoy the adventure, it's a lot of fun. I just can't wait for the snow to go away.
08-01-2015, 10:04  
Boat: too many
, just a . We also bought ours used. Easy to tow and launch, we would pull the summit of hwy 50 from Sacramento to Lake Tahoe and then Fallen Leaf Lake towing with a 1963 Ford Falcon with a 6 cylinder and manual . So, whatever you have will have no problems towing it.
08-01-2015, 10:12  
, but not a good boat for three to learn on simultaneously.

And it also depends on the people. The FJ is a sit-on boat, not a sit-in boat. That means no back rest. Young people might not mind, but I would find it too uncomfortable after about an hour. There are plenty of beginner-friendly sailboats that have back-friendly seating.
08-01-2015, 10:14  
Boat: too many
, but not a good boat for three to learn on simultaneously.
08-01-2015, 11:34  
. Sailed the bay. Taught sailing for the Red Cross in them. Best job I ever had. Find some others and , it's great practice and learning.
08-01-2015, 11:45  
Boat: Lagoon 400
too and starting out on an O'Day DaySailer 3. Just waiting until spring to give a whirl! I've looked at lots of these sub-20' day sailers from different manufacturers. They all are fairly similar, most are open bow or have a small cuddy cabin and some have a bit more than that like berths and a porta-potty. It all depends on how many people you plan to carry and what kinds of things you plan on doing with your boat.

My specs for a boat where mostly to be able to get it to the lake using our economy cars, it couldn't be very heavy. Secondly, I wanted something with two in a rig just to get the hang of this commonly used rig. When I move up in many years ahead, I'll have more of an understanding how this all works. Finally, I wanted a cabin or at least a cuddy cabin because I would like to try camping with it. Using a boom tent expands the room the small O'Day DaySailer has in the cuddy cabin.

I think you'll do well with the Flying Junior. I'm not speaking from experience but from my for my own needs and you said you want to do this with 3 people it shouldn't be a problem for having fun on the lake during the day. There isn't much on this boat so if you want to do more or if you need to have a portapotty for the ladies then you may want to look for something a bit bigger.
.
08-01-2015, 11:54  
 
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Flying Dutchman

Flying Dutchman is a 20 ′ 0 ″ / 6.1 m monohull sailboat designed by Uus van Essen and built by Advance Sailboat Corp., Binks Yacht Contructions, Plastrend / Composite Technologies, MacKay Boats Ltd., Sunbeam Yachts - Schöchl Yachtbau, Lanaverre, Alpa Yachts, Lockley Newport Boats, Mobjack Manufacturing Corp., Costantini (Chantier Naval Costantini), and Mader Bootswerft starting in 1951.

Drawing of Flying Dutchman

Rig and Sails

Auxilary power, accomodations, calculations.

The theoretical maximum speed that a displacement hull can move efficiently through the water is determined by it's waterline length and displacement. It may be unable to reach this speed if the boat is underpowered or heavily loaded, though it may exceed this speed given enough power. Read more.

Classic hull speed formula:

Hull Speed = 1.34 x √LWL

Max Speed/Length ratio = 8.26 ÷ Displacement/Length ratio .311 Hull Speed = Max Speed/Length ratio x √LWL

Sail Area / Displacement Ratio

A measure of the power of the sails relative to the weight of the boat. The higher the number, the higher the performance, but the harder the boat will be to handle. This ratio is a "non-dimensional" value that facilitates comparisons between boats of different types and sizes. Read more.

SA/D = SA ÷ (D ÷ 64) 2/3

  • SA : Sail area in square feet, derived by adding the mainsail area to 100% of the foretriangle area (the lateral area above the deck between the mast and the forestay).
  • D : Displacement in pounds.

Ballast / Displacement Ratio

A measure of the stability of a boat's hull that suggests how well a monohull will stand up to its sails. The ballast displacement ratio indicates how much of the weight of a boat is placed for maximum stability against capsizing and is an indicator of stiffness and resistance to capsize.

Ballast / Displacement * 100

Displacement / Length Ratio

A measure of the weight of the boat relative to it's length at the waterline. The higher a boat’s D/L ratio, the more easily it will carry a load and the more comfortable its motion will be. The lower a boat's ratio is, the less power it takes to drive the boat to its nominal hull speed or beyond. Read more.

D/L = (D ÷ 2240) ÷ (0.01 x LWL)³

  • D: Displacement of the boat in pounds.
  • LWL: Waterline length in feet

Comfort Ratio

This ratio assess how quickly and abruptly a boat’s hull reacts to waves in a significant seaway, these being the elements of a boat’s motion most likely to cause seasickness. Read more.

Comfort ratio = D ÷ (.65 x (.7 LWL + .3 LOA) x Beam 1.33 )

  • D: Displacement of the boat in pounds
  • LOA: Length overall in feet
  • Beam: Width of boat at the widest point in feet

Capsize Screening Formula

This formula attempts to indicate whether a given boat might be too wide and light to readily right itself after being overturned in extreme conditions. Read more.

CSV = Beam ÷ ³√(D / 64)

The FLYING DUTCHMAN is a high performance, 2 man, trapeze dinghy, with a large genoa. An olympic class from 1960 - 1992.

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Flying Dutchman advice

Discussion in ' Sailboats ' started by Tony F , Apr 23, 2024 .

  • flying dutchman

Tony F

Tony F New Member

I recently acquired a 1960’s Italian made Alpa Flying Dutchman. Unfortunately, the hull feels very questionable. It is extremely easy to push on it virtually anywhere and as a result, there is a lot of visible cracking. From what I have read, this hull is a non cored GRP layup which I guess is not known to be that strong or long lasting. My question is, should I strengthen the existing hull by adding fiberglass to it? I’m not worried about the weight because I don’t plan on racing. At the very least I had planned on removing the deck and replacing it with wood and clear coating it. At this point I want a FD one way or another so I either want to strengthen and reinforce THIS hull or build a new wood hull. Which do you think would be the best route? Thanks in advance for any help or advice!  

wet feet

wet feet Senior Member

Your initial thoughts are correct,the boat is an antique and they were never expected to last indefinitely.You will get more focused advice if pictures are available for perusal but a new member here may not be able to post them yet.You may need to adopt an attitude that is a flexible as your boat as the strength needs to be present in the critical areas and not uniformly applied,or the weight will increase massively.There are some areas where the hull does little more than preventing the inward passage of water and some where strength is absolutely essential,do you have the experience to determine which is which and as a supplementary question,do you have enough laminating experience to make a light layup satisfactory?The good news is that an FD has a large enough waterplane to withstand a bit of weight but that same weight won't be too welcome when you haul the boat up the ramp.  

rwatson

rwatson Senior Member

Building a new hull out of wood sounds extreme. As you aren't going racing, you can reinforce the heck out of the current one with no problems. Its way easier than building a new hull with the complex curves of these boats. It would even be easier to use the current hull as a "Plug", build a Mould, and layup a new fibreglass hull than do one out of what would be strip planking. A Plywood deck with a layer of glass and Epoxy is easy, as the decks are quite simple.  

CT249

CT249 Senior Member

If you just add another layer or two of 'normal glass you may not add much stiffness, because 'glass itself is not very stiff and the extra layers will not be far off the neutral axis of the skin. You could consider perhaps epoxying on foam (or even lightweight timber) mini frames with some carbon tape on top of them in strategic spots? Here's a brief thread on another Alpa resto; Attempting to restore a 1959 Flying Dutchman built by ALPA https://forums.sailinganarchy.com/threads/attempting-to-restore-a-1959-flying-dutchman-built-by-alpa.155972/ For what it's worth perhaps you could just do a quick job on this FD and sail it while you keep an eye out for another FD. The Alpa could be a cheap way of getting spare parts to use on the new one. I've sailed plenty of ancient and floppy Lasers. They don't appear to be significantly slower at club level and although they flex I've never seen a hull actually fail.  

philSweet

philSweet Senior Member

Fiberglass composites are very different today. I used to own a '68 fiberglass hull that was basically 1 layer of 24 ounce woven roving, and it felt about as structural as a warm Pop Tart. You get used to it. It was a MORC ocean racer and continued to cruise the Caribbean for many years after I owned it. You need to inspect the cracks around fittings and appendages. But at least you can get at both sides of the entire hull. It's biggest threat is letting it fill up with rainwater sitting on a trailer. If you are going to work on the hull, I'd plan on working with the flex. There are specialty flex additives for almost all the paints, goops, and glops you need to refinish a hull.  
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Andy

Andy Senior Member

I have a friend who fixed a floppy old single skin FD. The main area to focus on is the large flat bottom, as the curved bilge area is usually fine. He cut out all the (mostly debonded) stringers (these were just glass laid over cardboard tubes), cleaned off the gelcoat with a disc sander, laid core over the area (he used balsa, I'd use contour foam) and laminated glass over the whole lot, lapping it up into the bilge curve. All other spider cracks were dremelled out and filled, or gelcoat ground away and glass patches applied where there were actual cracks. Then all got hi build epoxy coated and 2 pack paint applied. You'd be around 1500 euros for all the materials. Having seen that boat first hand I'm not sure I would have tried to work with allowing it to flex...it was a polyester resin build, and there were definite signs that it was ready to snap at the bulkhead under the mainsheet track. It's a long low hull on an FD, and unlike a floppy laser which is much smaller/lower loads and with an unstayed mast, the FD is a highly loaded beast at times.  

HELLICONIA54

60's Binks Flying Dutchman, re-rig - HELP?

zwaky

Project Icarus - Flying Junior Restoration

Doug Lord

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New (to me) International FJ, drainage + repair questions

  • Thread starter Qorgyle
  • Start date Jul 14, 2022
  • Forums for All Owners
  • Trailer Sailors

Qorgyle

Simon Sexton

Qorgyle said: I'd like to add drainage holes to those seats Click to expand
rgranger said: What happens when you open that? Can you see the foam? Click to expand
Simon Sexton said: I believe the water inside the cockpit may have been inside the hull already Click to expand
Simon Sexton said: Drilling holes in the seats is a bad idea Click to expand
Simon Sexton said: remove any water left inside, and you should be alright to sail after that Click to expand

PaulK

My father's center-console skiff had foam "floatation" poured into the bilge up to the cockpit sole. It absorbed water over the years until it was totally saturated -- like the foam they put in flower arrangements to hold the stems in place. It must have weighed more than a ton by the time we figured it out. Of course it had been put into a dry, totally encapsulated fiberglass space by the builder, so it would never have any water intrusion problem..... Guess they forgot they were building a boat. We had to rip the whole cockpit sole out and then dig it out with a garden spade. Each shovelful weighed about 10 pounds and was dripping water. If your tanks are full of water-absorbing foam like this, opening up the inspection hatches to let it "dry out" will probably take as long to work as it took for the water to get in there in the first place. You probably don't want to wait five years or so for that to happen, so it looks like cutting open the seats to remove the foam will be necessary if there's a lot of it. A circular saw not set too deep will make a relatively clean cut. If you plan the cuts carefully you might be able to remove each seat in one piece so that you'll be able to glass them back in place after you replace the foam. Be sure the replacement foam is NOT hygroscopic. (Blue styrofoam might be a good choice.)  

PaulK said: Of course it had been put into a dry, totally encapsulated fiberglass space by the builder, so it would never have any water intrusion problem..... Guess they forgot they were building a boat Click to expand
PaulK said: cutting open the seats to remove the foam will be necessary if there's a lot of it. Click to expand

1658163243434.png

Qorgyle said: Is it possible to sail a dinghy on just the headsail? Click to expand

AaronD

@Qorgyle : I've mostly sailed a small keelboat, and my new-to-me dinghy is awaiting her first splash. So I'm anything but an expert here. But I know you can get inflatable flotation bags of various sizes - another option to fill a leaking seat (or to add flotation to the bow cuddy area that would otherwise fill with water in a capsize). Probably more expensive than foam, but easier to fit into awkward spaces and easier to remove as needed. E.g. SB2302 Buoyancy bag - Pillow bag 36 " X 12" - HOLT I have no recommendation of that specific bag or source - if you do enough research to have a recommendation, please let me know.  

AaronD said: inflatable flotation bags Click to expand
LloydB said: My goal was to avoid capsize, irons and wind gusts then get back to the dock mostly dry. Click to expand
LloydB said: a fender might be a bit too heavy Click to expand
LloydB said: Reaching against true wind can be done with a jib only but the degree of gain would depend upon the size of both the sail and the wind. Click to expand

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flying dutchman junior sailboat

IMAGES

  1. A late 1950’s International Flying Dutchman Class sailboat. The

    flying dutchman junior sailboat

  2. Flying Dutchman Sailboat Photo Gallery

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  3. Flying Dutchman

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  4. 13 best Sailing our Flying Junior (FJ) images on Pinterest

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  5. Flying Dutchman Sailboat Photo Gallery

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  6. 13' Flying Junior style sailboat. Custom built to meet your specs

    flying dutchman junior sailboat

VIDEO

  1. Restauro Flying Junior Alpa

  2. Hobie 33 "Flying Dutchman" at 18.9kts

  3. Flying Dutchman

  4. Legends: The Flying Dutchman

  5. CYC Sailboat flying in the wind!

  6. Flying Dutchmen

COMMENTS

  1. International FJ

    The International FJ is a Dutch sailboat that was designed by Uus Van Essen and Conrad Gülcher as a trainer and one design racer, first built in 1956.. The boat was initially called the Flying Dutchman Junior (after the Flying Dutchman one design racer), as it was designed as a trainer for that Olympic sailing class boat. It was later called the Flying Junior.

  2. INTERNATIONAL FJ

    Formerly FLYING DUTCHMAN JUNIOR, FLYING JUNIOR. As of 1980 the name was officially changed to INTERNATIONAL FJ. First built of Fiberglass in 1960. A 'Club' version (CLUB FJ) is of heavier construction with approximately the same dimensions. There have been a number of other variants including the DEMON, a stretched version of the same design, […]

  3. International FJ

    Formerly FLYING DUTCHMAN JUNIOR, FLYING JUNIOR. As of 1980 the name was officially changed to INTERNATIONAL FJ. First built of Fiberglass in 1960. A 'Club' version (CLUB FJ) is of heavier construction with approximately the same dimensions.

  4. Flying Junior

    Flying Junior. November 30, 1999 by Sail1Design Editor Leave a Comment. The "Flying Dutchman Junior" was originally designed, in Holland, by Van Essen, a well-­known Dutch boat designer. Listed as co­designer was Conrad Gulcher, Dutch Olympic sailor. (Gulcher and Van Essen also collaborated on the Flying Dutchman Conrad Gulcher served as ...

  5. Club FJ • Shoreline Sailboats

    The International Flying Junior or FJ is a sailing dinghy which was originally designed in 1955 in the Netherlands by renowned boat designer Van Essen and Olympic sailor Conrad Gülcher. The FJ was built to serve as a training boat for the then Olympic-class Flying Dutchman. The FJ has a beam of 4'11" and an overall sail area of 100 square ...

  6. Flying Dutchman

    The Flying Dutchman is a boat you an sail your whole life. Our youngest sailors are starting with 12 years and the oldest sailors in the class are in their eighties. In its over 70-year history, the FD was and still is one thing above all: a demanding, fast and modern regatta dinghy. Without disturbing its classic appearance, new technical ...

  7. One Design Spotlight: Club Flying Junior

    The Boat: CFJ, Light Air Machine. The CFJ is a light, maneuverable boat at 13 feet long, 4 feet wide and weighing in around 220 lbs. Slightly shorter, narrower and lighter than the C420, the CFJ is designed to go upwind, fast. Narrow bow entry and a more rounded hull shape than the C420 means better upwind feel at the sacrifice of the ease of ...

  8. Flying Dutchman USA

    About Flying Dutchman USA. The Flying Dutchman is a one-design international two-person class with active sailors all over the world. It is one of the most exhilarating dinghies you will ever be in. Even after dropping the Olympic status after the 1992 Olympics, the FD Class continues to be popular for the above reasons; there are young members ...

  9. Flying Dutchman (dinghy)

    The Flying Dutchman was an Olympic sailing class in double-handed dinghies from 1960 until 1992. [1] [2] Due to its complexity, the design's cost has been a barrier to its wider acceptance. [6] A Classic Sailboats review noted that "the 'fastest double-handed dinghy in the world' made its Olympic debut in Naples in 1960.

  10. Flying Junior sailing

    Flying Junior Sailing is the official video channel of the international Flying Junior sailing class. The Flying Junior is one of the most versatile sailing dinghies in the world.

  11. This web site is home to the International Flying Dutchman Class

    The International Flying Dutchman Class Association of the United States (IFDCAUS) is the organizing authority for FD sailing in the United States. The FD class sponsors this web site, sanctions national competitive events, and generally promotes Flying Dutchman sailing in this country.

  12. Flying junior sailboat good beginner boat?

    IMO, the Flying Junior is a good boat for learning, but not a good boat for three to learn on simultaneously. And it also depends on the people. The FJ is a sit-on boat, not a sit-in boat. That means no back rest. Young people might not mind, but I would find it too uncomfortable after about an hour.

  13. Flying Junior sailboats for sale by owner.

    Flying Junior preowned sailboats for sale by owner. Flying Junior used sailboats for sale by owner. Home. Register & Post. View All Sailboats. Search. Avoid Fraud. ... 13.22' Sailnetic Flying Junior International Santa Rosa, California Asking $1,900. 33' CSY 33 easthampton, New York Asking $28,500. 12' Custom Norwegian Pram Wellington, Florida

  14. Flying Dutchman

    Flying Dutchman is a 20 ′ 0 ″ / 6.1 m monohull sailboat designed by Uus van Essen and built by Advance Sailboat Corp., Binks Yacht Contructions, Plastrend / Composite Technologies, MacKay Boats Ltd., Sunbeam Yachts - Schöchl Yachtbau, Lanaverre, Alpa Yachts, Lockley Newport Boats, Mobjack Manufacturing Corp., Costantini (Chantier Naval Costantini), and Mader Bootswerft starting in 1951.

  15. Nationals

    The Flying Dutchman Nationals were hosted by the Willow Bank Yacht Club on Lake Cazenovia on July 19-21, 2019. Nine Flying Dutchman competed in the 2019 National Championship/Cuspidor Regatta. Brothers Chris and Jeff Wrenn from Santa Cruz, CA were crowned 2019 National Champions after three days and 12 races of good winds and competitive racing.

  16. Flying Dutchman advice

    I recently acquired a 1960's Italian made Alpa Flying Dutchman. Unfortunately, the hull feels very questionable. It is extremely easy to push on it virtually anywhere and as a result, there is a lot of visible cracking. From what I have read, this hull is a non cored GRP layup which I guess is not known to be that strong or long lasting.

  17. International Flying Dutchman Class Organisation

    So at the same time we want to ask if anyone is willing to take over the job as the Boat Registrar. The task of the boat registrar is providing the measurement certificates. In the first place for the new boats but also in case of change of ownership or when measurement certificates are lost. In 2023 Tony issued 19 measurement certificates.

  18. New (to me) International FJ, drainage

    Jul 14, 2022. 43. Catalina 25 Wing 5753 Portland, OR. Jul 14, 2022. #1. Hello! New member here, and new owner of an International FJ (aka Flying Dutchman Junior). Since it seems mine is unusual in that it has seating (most pictures that I find have wider sides, and you just sit on those), here's a picture: I trailered it down to the lake where ...

  19. FLYING DUTCHMAN

    The FLYING DUTCHMAN is a high performance, 2 man, trapeze dinghy, with a large genoa. An olympic class from 1960 - 1992. Sailboat Forum. View All Topics: ... A Ballast/Displacement ratio of 40 or more translates into a stiffer, more powerful boat that will be better able to stand up to the wind. Bal./Disp = ballast (lbs)/ displacement (lbs)*100

  20. Flying Dutchman

    The Flying Dutchman (Dutch: De Vliegende Hollander) is a legendary ghost ship, allegedly never able to make port, but doomed to sail the sea forever.The myths and ghost stories are likely to have originated from the 17th-century Golden Age of the Dutch East India Company (VOC) and of Dutch maritime power. The oldest known extant version of the legend dates from the late 18th century.

  21. Flying Dutchman USA

    Welcome to the the Flying Dutchman Class of the USA! This semi-official Facebook page is devoted to our much beloved one design sailboat, the most fun and beautiful boat there is. Feel free to...

  22. International Flying Junior (dinghy sailing)

    International Flying Junior (dinghy sailing) Public group. ·. 504 members. Join group. FLYING JUNIOR The "Flying Dutchman Junior" was originally designed, in Holland, by Van Essen, a well known Dutch boat designer.

  23. Classifieds

    This is Flying Dutchman Sailing; Das Boot; Technique; FD Bulletin Articles; Trapeze Newsletters; FD Social Media; Registry of Boats; Archived Posts. 2012 Worlds in Santa Cruz; 2011 Worlds in Garda; ... Free Spare Parts for Classic Flying Dutchman (US 40) June 15, 2020 Chicago, Illinois. Contact Seller/Buyer [FULFILLED] Free 1958 Flying Dutchman ...