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columbia 22 sailboat interior

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01-02-2011, 10:55  
Boat: 1967 Columbia 22' & 1976 Compac 16'
22' She needs a decent amount of shes been sitting in the at the st pete marina in for a few years and i just needed some from all of you guys who know what your doing as to my plan. I have limited for as do most normal people but im trying to keep this on a tight . Im going to be sailing the about 30 miles to its new home, the owner said i would be able to now in the condition its in but im not so sure... My plan is the is pretty much gone and im pretty sure its full of barnicles after years of sitting there so number 1 i was going to take it out of the and get a bottom job done over at progressive boatyard in st pete. While its out of the water is this a good time to check the and or replace them? Does anyone have a rough idea what it would cost to replace the on a 22? $200? $500 ? or more??? Also when i lifted up the to see the there was water all in there but im assuming its from water coming in from the compaionway or somewhere else.. While shes out of the water are there any other cost efficient things i can look at to make her in better condition that wont cost me too much? After all thats done im planning on rewiring all of the since none of it works and installing a new deep cycle a 6 switch dc panel a small 500 watt and making sure all the bulbs and is working. The needs tons of but its pretty much just a cosmetic disaster im more so worried about the integrity of the , the feels pretty solid there is slight bounce on the forward deck, the standing seems to be in decent shape, the is brand new, the tiller is pretty much garbage i think i can find a new tiller for pretty .. Any on what to check replace or what order to do my would be great!!! Thank you very much!!! Matthew
01-02-2011, 11:40  
Boat: 1976 Sabre 28-2
load is carried by a bridge to the main bulkhead, not a post to the . This has been a problem on some . You may need to figure out a better way to transfer the load to the bulkhead than the way the factory did it. Possibly a sandwich bolted to the bulkhead.
01-02-2011, 11:50  
Boat: 1967 Columbia 22' & 1976 Compac 16'
post or post going down to the keel just the bulkhead by the v-berth, when you say a sandwich to the bulkhead what exactly do you mean?? just put plywood on both sides of the bulkhead or something??
01-02-2011, 12:10  
Boat: 1976 Sabre 28-2
over to the bulkheads. Plywood shaped to follow the curve of the deck and screwed and glued to bulkheads might do it if that is feasible. It's been a long time so don't know if this is a feasible solution, however. This was a problem with here in with strong winds and big seas. May not be an issue with boats in your area. It is a need for boats that may be sailed hard. Better to take care of it before the mast starts lowering room in in the .
01-02-2011, 15:54  
Boat: Roberts Offshore 38
up the deck plates and clean out the . Mop it dry until there is no water at all. This way you will be able to tell if the are below the waterline, ie keel bolts or tube. If the stays dry for a few days, that's a good sign that the are upwards. Could be toe rail bolts, chain plates if they go thru the deck, caulking between the and the sides, and the gasketing in the themselves. Just about anything that is bolted on deck may be subject to leakage as the caulking fails.

Check the water tank and lines. Fill the tank, with water and coloring. See where it leaks. You can always flush out the tank later. (good idea too, who knows what life forms are living in there now)

As for the spring on the foredeck, if its a general spring across the entire deck as you walk on it, that's OK. The heavier you are the more it will flex. But if you think you are getting soft spots only in certain areas, it may be problems.

How bad is the tiller? gone, starting to split? You might be able to save it by it down, blowing all the dust out of the cracks, and painting the splits with . Clamping it is a real treat, you need curved shims to put between the clamp jaws. Take a 2 inch piece of 2x4 and drill it end on with a hole saw of the diameter of the tiller at the point you want to put the shim. You will need to drill it from both ends. Put wax paper between the shims and the tiller, then clamp away. Use pieces of in a loop around the tiller shims with a toggle to twist them tight. (Spanish windlass). Saves lots of on clamps that way. Or just keep filling, and until the cracks are filled. My tiller was a real mess but that fixed it pretty good. For general repairs, you'd be surprised what you can do with a quart or so of 2 part .

While you have the tiller off being repaired, check the fit between the tiller fitting and the for slop. If the hole for the bolt is elongated, you may be able to drill it for the next bolt size but be careful to leave lots of meat on the .

I'm assuming the electrics don't work because the is toast so buy your battery first. Buy a digital multimeter if you don't have one. Check all the , and fuse holders with the meter set for resistance. Clean the fuse holder with a bit of sand paper for good connectivity. Check the from the battery + connector all the way through the and switches. Zero or next to zero on the meter is good. High reading indicates a problem, perhaps a nick or partial cut in the wire. Huge numbers indicate an open (circuit is cut) and you will have to find it and . Some meters have setting where they beep if the circuit is good. Then hook the battery up and check the existing . Check each light and light fitting with the meter, and clean with a bit of sand paper if you get bad readings, then check again.

Get yourself a chunk of #14 wire about 12-15 feet long, and put alligator clips on either end. (Get these at Shack, get the ones with rubber boots on them) This way you can isolate problems to a length of circuit or bypass a switch or light fixture. You may need to bypass a bad section of wire so be ready for that as well. You will want that up before you move the boat 30 miles to its new home.

While the bottom is being done, check the rudder for rust stains and cracks. Check the play in the rudder tube by moving the rudder side to side and fore and aft. How many years has she been sitting on that ? Check for . If its there, repairing it before repainting will add expense now, but save it later when you don't need to again to deal with it.

That's about all I can think of right now that can be done fairly cheaply. Putting in that plywood cross over under the mast is a good idea too.


Sabre
01-02-2011, 16:30  
Boat: 1967 Columbia 22' & 1976 Compac 16'
at least not that im aware of its not the dinnete style cabin its the cabin with the berths. The spring on the deck seems to be everywhere but i do weigh 230 lbs soo im sure a little spring may be ok. The tiller is in horrible shape the is long gone its starting to away bad to the point where it has holes in it, it looks like if i put alot of pressure on it i could snap it right in half. The dont work due to water, the person that owned this boat before just let it sit in its slip for 5 years, the dc panel and ac was places right near the floor on the port side. It looks as if eveytime water comes in the compainionway it would pour all over the dc panel im probably going to replace the panel and i was thinking moving it over the berth making a little wooden housing to neatly place it all and get it off the floor! Do you advise me to replace all of the ? Or do u think just relplacing the dc panel and ac invertor and it up will be enough? I will start thinking of a way to support the bulkhead also! Here is the link to my photobucket I know its in rought shape and needs a decent amount of work so dont be to harsh!! :-) Thanks for all the advice i have gotten so far!! Oh yeah as you can see in the pictures the is pretty much just sitting on the floor?!?! What do you guys advise me to do or where to put it? the bilge is really narrow and i cant seem to find any that will fit in there!!
02-02-2011, 15:16  
Boat: Roberts Offshore 38
03-02-2011, 18:43  
Boat: 1967 Columbia 22' & 1976 Compac 16'
05-02-2013, 23:38  
22' that appears to be in great condition. Never seen saltwater and has been well cared for...I'd like to know how your boat is holding up and what things I should be looking for going wrong or being worn on this particular boat.

Thanks,

-Joe
05-02-2013, 23:42  
Kai,

Great post... thanks for all the info. I'm considering the same boat here in , OR. Apparently it's never seen saltwater and from the pics I've seen looks to be in great condition. It's currently in the water, so I was considering putting a wetsuit and goggles on and swimming underneath w/ a flashlight to check for blistering.

Any other advice for making sure she's watertight without hauling her out?

Any advice helps...

Thanks,

-JV
07-02-2013, 09:24  
. You spend a lot of money on slip rent otherwise and having a makes things way easier if you need to prep for a . Although Tampa Bay is usually pretty safe in that regard, patterns are changing.

Another consideration if you are new to sailing is to join a club where you can try out a variety of boats and take a class or two. I highly recommend taking a Basic Keelboat class from a US Sailing certified .
 
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Columbia 22

The columbia 22 is a 22.0ft masthead sloop designed by william crealock and built in fiberglass by columbia yachts between 1966 and 1972., 1541 units have been built..

The Columbia 22 is a light sailboat which is a very high performer. It is very stable / stiff and has a low righting capability if capsized. It is best suited as a racing boat.

Columbia 22 sailboat under sail

Columbia 22 for sale elsewhere on the web:

columbia 22 sailboat interior

Main features

Model Columbia 22
Length 22 ft
Beam 7.75 ft
Draft 3.17 ft
Country United states (North America)
Estimated price $ 0 ??

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columbia 22 sailboat interior

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Sail area / displ. 22
Ballast / displ. 50 %
Displ. / length 121.31
Comfort ratio 10.76
Capsize 2.39
Hull type Monohull fin keel with spade rudder
Construction Fiberglass
Waterline length 20.08 ft
Maximum draft 3.17 ft
Displacement 2200 lbs
Ballast 1100 lbs
Hull speed 6 knots

columbia 22 sailboat interior

We help you build your own hydraulic steering system - Lecomble & Schmitt

Rigging Masthead Sloop
Sail area (100%) 232 sq.ft
Air draft 0 ft ??
Sail area fore 111.29 sq.ft
Sail area main 120.44 sq.ft
I 26.56 ft
J 8.38 ft
P 23.50 ft
E 10.25 ft
Nb engines 1
Total power 0 HP
Fuel capacity 0 gals

Accommodations

Water capacity 0 gals
Headroom 0 ft
Nb of cabins 0
Nb of berths 0
Nb heads 0

Builder data

Builder Columbia Yachts
Designer William Crealock
First built 1966
Last built 1972
Number built 1541

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11/15/11, , Fort Worth, Texas, $700
3/18/06, , Port Washington, New York, asking $599
8/21/07, , Lake Charles Yacht Club, Lake Charles, Louisiana, $2,800
4/7/05, , Redwood City, California, $695
7/21/16, , Corpus Christi, Texas, $2,500
12/8/05, , Albuquerque, New Mexico, $1,000
7/8/11, , Lexington, Kentucky, $800
9/6/10, , Dayton, Texas, $2,500
2/25/10, , Austin, Texas $880
5/6/08l, , Rush Creek Yacht Club, Lake Ray Hubbard, $2,000
, Fort Worth Boat Club (Eagle Mtn lake), Texas, $2000
, Lake Travis, Austin, Texas, $1500
6/27/08, , Canyon Lake, Texas, $4,000

             
             
             
     

Columbia 22

columbia 22 sailboat interior

The Columbia 22 was built by Columbia Yachts in the United States from 1966 until 1972, with 1,541 boats completed. A number of boats were sold as kits for amateur construction, under the name of Sailcrafter Custom Yachts.

The Columbia 22 is a recreational keelboat, built predominantly of fiberglass, with wood trim. It has a masthead sloop rig, a slightly raked stem, a nearly-plumb transom, an internally mounted spade-type rudder controlled by a tiller and a fixed fin keel or optional stub keel and centerboard. The stub keel/centerboard model was only produced in small numbers. It displaces 2,200 lb (998 kg) and carries 1,100 lb (499 kg) of cast iron ballast. Boats built from 1970 and later have different hatch locations and an outboard motor well.

The keel-equipped version of the boat has a draft of 3.17 ft (0.97 m), while the centreboard-equipped version has a draft of 4.83 ft (1.47 m) with the centerboard extended and 2.5 ft (0.76 m) with it retracted, allowing ground transportation on a trailer. The boat is normally fitted with a small 3 to 6 hp (2 to 4 kW) outboard motor.

The design has sleeping accommodation for four people, with a double "V"-berth in the bow cabin, and two straight settees in the main cabin, one combined with the dinette table. The galley is located on the starboard side just forward of the companionway ladder. The galley is equipped with a stove, ice box and a sink. The optional head is located under the bow cabin "V"-berth. Cabin headroom is 55 in (140 cm).

The design has a PHRF racing average handicap of 186 and a hull speed of 6.0 kn (11.1 km/h).

Source: Wikipedia

LOA: 22.00 ft LWL: 20.08 ft Beam: 7.75 ft Draft: 3.17 ft Displacement: 2200.00 lbs Ballast: 1100.00 lbs Hull type: Fin w/spade rudder Hull construction: FG Rigging type: Masthead Sloop

Columbia 22 for sale in the last 12 months

Below you'll find the latest Columbia 22 listings for the last 12 months. We compare the listing price with boats listed in the past and the color coding indicates if the price is good (green = below the average listing price) or more on the expensive side (red = seller is asking more than the average listing price).

Date Year
Country, State
Price Details
2023-08-241968
USD 10750
2023-08-241968
USD 10703
2023-08-181968
USD 10750

Columbia 22 listing prices over time

Listing details.



Columbia 22



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22 Added 07-Oct-2020




columbia 22 sailboat interior

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Columbia 22, vic, 149 posts.

Thumbs Up

Hi everyone Anyone know much about these boats? www.gumtree.com.au/s-ad/metung/sail-boats/yacht-22-ft-columbia/1243099574 (sorry, I don't know how to copy a clickable link) Apparently the are "midget ocean racers", according to google. So if that's true she would be good for coastal sailing and more, yes? It's a nice looking little boat from the outside, but the inside? Might be good for a couple of years for me to learn on and get some experience. Though the price tag means it probably needs a fair bit of work. I'm looking at my options and all imput is welcome. Cheers, Mike.

Bananabender

Qld, 1569 posts.

Columbia 22 was built by International Marine Scoresby Melb. ,now called Caribbean along side Columbia 27 , 34 and the Bertram range of motor yachts. High quality build ( not to a price) and with high disp./ ballast ratio of around 50% ,great for family to learn how to sail and potter around in . There are a lot of faster 22 footers . With the high freeboard it would have the largest interior of any 22 footer . Reminiscent of a mini Columbia 34. International made some adjustments to the US version to suit our conditions. Don't know about it being a mini Ocean anything with only an outboard . Remember its an old boat now so check it out thoroughly .

garymalmgren

garymalmgren

Brand new 6hp Yamaha 4-Stroke. New halyards & sheets, and life lines. With those two items out of the way, I don't see this one as a money drain. The photo shows her on a slip having the bottom done. It would be prudent to ask when that was. Otherwise, Good solid boat. Good price. Worth a drive down to have a look that's for sure. gary

NSW, 1488 posts

That looks great in the photos, and excellent value. The Columbia yachts were known for being built like a brick outhouse. The midget ocean racer terminology came out of the MORC (midget ocean racer club) rating system in the US at the time. So they are "moderate ocean" capable............ www.baltimoresun.com/news/bs-xpm-1991-02-03-9113001121-story.html Google "columbia 22 restoration" or columbia 22 refit" and at least 5 sites will come up - some with excellent detail and photos. Note that there is a Col22 for sale in Tas for $13.5K - at least it comes up on google not sure if it is still for sale. As expected the interior photos shown in the advert indicate a tad of varnish needs to be splashed around onto completely sanded back timber - so what. The interior in the photos looks clean and cared for. Suggest check; the condition and age of the standing rigging, the cabin sag under the deck stepped mast - if there is any. Easily fixed with beefing up the under mast support system with ply sandwich doublers each side of the existing support bulkhead. Lift the floorboards and check the keel bolts - they are threaded into the cast iron keel. One of the restoration sites has extensive details of keel bolt renewal using grade 8.8 bolts. Chainplates, and their bolts, also bulkhead in that area - hopefully no water has got in to rot the ply. Again this can be fixed...... As above well worth viewing and soon.

Thanks guys, the owner says...."She is great on the lakes, but I wouldn't take her coastal sailing" And thats what I want to do as part of my learning, plus how else to get her to one of the bays? Its a shame as I really liked the look of her, and there aren't too many for sale down here I like that suitable.

Ramona

NSW, 7495 posts

Select to expand quote Mike367 said.. Thanks guys, the owner says...."She is great on the lakes, but I wouldn't take her coastal sailing" And thats what I want to do as part of my learning, plus how else to get her to one of the bays? Its a shame as I really liked the look of her, and there aren't too many for sale down here I like that suitable. These boats were built in the thousands in the USA and I've seen a lot of them sailing in Hawaii. Whereas Australians generally start sailing dinghies, Americans sail these sort of yachts as daysailers. They would be just as seaworthy as Hood 23's or Endeavour 24's.

twodogs1969

twodogs1969

NSW, 1000 posts

For that type of money you could pick up a folk boat or an endeavour 26 or maybe a Holland 25 these would suit you better.

Select to expand quote Ramona said.. Mike367 said.. Thanks guys, the owner says...."She is great on the lakes, but I wouldn't take her coastal sailing" And thats what I want to do as part of my learning, plus how else to get her to one of the bays? Its a shame as I really liked the look of her, and there aren't too many for sale down here I like that suitable. These boats were built in the thousands in the USA and I've seen a lot of them sailing in Hawaii. Whereas Australians generally start sailing dinghies, Americans sail these sort of yachts as daysailers. They would be just as seaworthy as Hood 23's or Endeavour 24's. So she be fine on the vic coastline?

Select to expand quote twodogs1969 said.. For that type of money you could pick up a folk boat or an endeavour 26 or maybe a Holland 25 these would suit you better. It's Slim pickings down here in Victoria and it's a long sail from Sydney.

Select to expand quote Mike367 said.. twodogs1969 said.. For that type of money you could pick up a folk boat or an endeavour 26 or maybe a Holland 25 these would suit you better. It's Slim pickings down here in Victoria and it's a long sail from Sydney. www.boatsonline.com.au/boats-for-sale/used/trailer-boats/south-coast-25/245354 This has just sold down there Would be better so they do exist Here is an endeavour 26 Used Endeavour 26 Restored With All The Gear. for Sale | Yachts For Sale | Yachthub yachthub.com/list/yachts-for-sale/used/sail-monohulls/endeavour-26-restored-with-all-the-gear/245469

I missed the south coast 25, I don't usually look to closely at trailer sailors. Maybe I should in future. I've looked at Bojangles and from memory I have it marked as needing work. I'll take another look after work. Thanks for that.

"Columbia 22?" started by Mike367

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  • Sailboat Guide

1968 Columbia 22

  • Description

Seller's Description

Standard features

Contact DAVID at ThreeSixOneFourFourThreeThreeNineZeroFive

Boat is located in CORPUS CHRISTI, Texas.

This Columbia 22 is a production sailboat built in 1968 during the heyday of fiberglass sailboats.

The Columbia companys William B Crealock design is noted for its, high performance, thicker fiberglass, and heavier standing rigging.

As a daysailer, the Columbia 22 has many beneficial features usually found on larger boats. 1-Roomy cockpit with over 14 linear feet of seating. 2-High freeboard makes for a dryer day. 3- The outboard motor well is forward of the spade rudder enabling more powerful maneuvering. 4- Motor well doubles as an ice chest if no motor is present. 5- Full masthead jib along with the backstay create simple, stable standing rigging- There are three shrouds on each side. 6- 1,000-pound fin keel draft 3-2 and thru-hull spade rudder mean crisp, but stable tacking. 7- With six enclosed compartments located under the cabin cushions and additional storage under the cockpit and aft of side berths, there is plenty of storage. 8- Includes 5 Hp Tohatsu 20 longshaft Outboard Motor with Less than 35 engine hours.

Sails included Cruising Main with 2 Jiffy Reef points, 120 Genoa, 100 Working Jib, Storm Jib Compass, inclinometer, SS bow pulpit, Transom-mounted fold-up SS boarding ladder, Jib snubbing winch, 2 Jib sheet winches, boom vang, cushions, C.G. safety gear flares, F.E., PFDs throw-able cushions. 3 anchors, 2 Danforth-style plus one smaller Danforth lunch-hook.

Rig and Sails

Auxilary power, accomodations, calculations.

The theoretical maximum speed that a displacement hull can move efficiently through the water is determined by it's waterline length and displacement. It may be unable to reach this speed if the boat is underpowered or heavily loaded, though it may exceed this speed given enough power. Read more.

Classic hull speed formula:

Hull Speed = 1.34 x √LWL

Max Speed/Length ratio = 8.26 ÷ Displacement/Length ratio .311 Hull Speed = Max Speed/Length ratio x √LWL

Sail Area / Displacement Ratio

A measure of the power of the sails relative to the weight of the boat. The higher the number, the higher the performance, but the harder the boat will be to handle. This ratio is a "non-dimensional" value that facilitates comparisons between boats of different types and sizes. Read more.

SA/D = SA ÷ (D ÷ 64) 2/3

  • SA : Sail area in square feet, derived by adding the mainsail area to 100% of the foretriangle area (the lateral area above the deck between the mast and the forestay).
  • D : Displacement in pounds.

Ballast / Displacement Ratio

A measure of the stability of a boat's hull that suggests how well a monohull will stand up to its sails. The ballast displacement ratio indicates how much of the weight of a boat is placed for maximum stability against capsizing and is an indicator of stiffness and resistance to capsize.

Ballast / Displacement * 100

Displacement / Length Ratio

A measure of the weight of the boat relative to it's length at the waterline. The higher a boat’s D/L ratio, the more easily it will carry a load and the more comfortable its motion will be. The lower a boat's ratio is, the less power it takes to drive the boat to its nominal hull speed or beyond. Read more.

D/L = (D ÷ 2240) ÷ (0.01 x LWL)³

  • D: Displacement of the boat in pounds.
  • LWL: Waterline length in feet

Comfort Ratio

This ratio assess how quickly and abruptly a boat’s hull reacts to waves in a significant seaway, these being the elements of a boat’s motion most likely to cause seasickness. Read more.

Comfort ratio = D ÷ (.65 x (.7 LWL + .3 LOA) x Beam 1.33 )

  • D: Displacement of the boat in pounds
  • LOA: Length overall in feet
  • Beam: Width of boat at the widest point in feet

Capsize Screening Formula

This formula attempts to indicate whether a given boat might be too wide and light to readily right itself after being overturned in extreme conditions. Read more.

CSV = Beam ÷ ³√(D / 64)

Boats built after 1969 differed slightly in the location of hatches and the introduction of an outboard well. A keel/centerboard model was also available though they are said to exist only in small numbers. Draft for CB version: BU: 2.5’; BD: 4.83’. The CORONADO 23 (MKI) is similar but with a different coach roof. In the mid-70’s, some were built to this design under license in Australia. Later they were also available as kits under the Sailcrafter brand.

This listing is presented by SailboatOwners.com . Visit their website for more information or to contact the seller.

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Columbia 22 Interior Elevation & Plan

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Plan Date: 1968 Size: 44 x 32

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Our Columbia 22 Refit

We have a Columbia 22 sailboat. This blog details our progress through its restoration. Neither of us are shipwrights, but we have good advice and are both avid sailors.

Sunday, May 14, 2006

  • What else have we been up to?

columbia 22 sailboat interior

Saturday, January 28, 2006

  • Glassing the Keel

columbia 22 sailboat interior

Monday, January 02, 2006

  • Happy New Year!

Friday, December 30, 2005

  • Rudder and more bulkhead work:

columbia 22 sailboat interior

  • Bulkheads and mast step:

columbia 22 sailboat interior

  • Bottom Paint Removal:
  • Removing the motor mount and rudder:

Monday, December 26, 2005

  • Removing the Keel:

columbia 22 sailboat interior

  • Projected Project List:

columbia 22 sailboat interior

Sunday, December 25, 2005

Pandora's box opened.....

columbia 22 sailboat interior

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columbia 22 sailboat interior

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I'm considering getting a Columbia 22 sailboat. The seller posts in his ad the following: "The Columbia 22 is a light displacement midget ocean racer (C.C.A. approximately 19.4)" I've attempted to learn about CCA ratings but have not been able to by searching online. The "light displacement midget ocean racer" is quoted from brochures/flyers developed for this boat. So, what does a CCA rating of 19.4 mean? I'd really like to know. Thanks.  

columbia 22 sailboat interior

it does not mean much today. the seller is just blowing smoke. Cruising club of America, CCA rating is a racing handicap rating system used from the 1950's and into the late 60's. the system was used mostly for offshore racing and seem to favor the older wooden boats of the day. it was used by designers to make boats that would rate better then the competition to sell more boats. Putting an offshore rating on a 22' boat that would not even be allowed to race in an offshore race is bit ridiculous. A Columbia 22 by today standards is not a light displacement boat and certainly never was a midget ocean racer. If you find one in good shape they are a boat that sails fairly good. the shoal draft centerboard model suffers from the short rudder and looses grip when heeled over when the wind is up above 12 knots. mast head rig can also be a handful when the wind blows. Sailed them when I was in HS. lots of them in Newport harbor back in the day. most all deep keel models, no shoal water here.  

columbia 22 sailboat interior

As noted the CCA Rating Rule is an obsolete measurement rule. Measurement rules attempt to rate the relative speed of one design as compared to another through a limited number of measurements. Rules like the CCA tend to be gross oversimplification and do a poor job of predicting the actual speed or other behavior of the boat. The problem with measurement rules is that they tend to over emphasize some aspects of speed, and under emphasize others. And most measurement rules ignore design aspects related to seaworthiness, motion comfort or easy handling. This was especially true of the CCA rule. Because the CCA measurement rule was published designers gamed the rule in ways that distorted the boat in ways that made almost no sense other than to beat the rule. In the case of the CCA rule, this happened to an extreme that temporarily altered boats designed to the rule in very negative ways. The CCA Rule way over emphasized the impact of water line length, and stability, and under emphasized the impact of jibs and mizzens. This produced boats with absurdly short waterlines relative to their length on deck. It produced boats that were short on stability relative their drag. It produced rig proportions that were inefficient and hard to handle, especially short-handed. And the CCA Rule was pretty much the only rule used in the U.S. Because of that pretty much all production boats, with very few exceptions were designed to the CCA from the mid-1940's until 1970. The good news is that the Columbia 22 was not designed to the CCA Rule. It was designed to the Midget Ocean Racing Rule (MORC). The MORC Rule was intentionally written to address the short comings of the CCA Rule. It was purposefully written to encourage small boats that could be raced offshore. It included factors which discouraged overly short waterline length. It included minimum stability requirements. MORC included minimum accommodation requirements such as a minimum headroom, galley, dining table, berth number and size requirements. MORC produced really good boats for the era and was provided one of several fruitful testing grounds that contributed to a better understanding of yacht design and some of these lessons are in the DNA of the modern understanding of what makes for a safe, fast, seaworthy, and easy to handle boat. For the record, neither the CCA or MORC Rule were a handicap rule. Handicap rules rate boats based on their past performance, Jeff  

columbia 22 sailboat interior

I agree with overbored that the old CCA rating is largely meaningless today. Note that there once was an active group called the Midget Ocean Racing Club (MORC) that was formed to permit small boats (under 30 feet) to race. You can find some info at www.morc.org . More important is the current PHRF rating which is 267 here in western Long Island Sound. Most sailboat racing today in the US is under that racing rule. For non-racers, the base PHRF rating gives you some idea of how fast the boat is in comparison to others you might be considering.  

Many thanks for the replies. I was interested in what the seller was saying by mentioning the CCA rating... not much, apparently. I'm not a racer. Just looking for a seaworthy sailboat to do some ocean daysailing out of the local bay.  

To be more specific about the Columbia 22 relative to the concerns that you have; The Columbia 22 was the first production boat designed by Bill Crealock, who went on to be an extremely prolific designer and eventually a very respected designer. In the early days, Crealock mostly provided services to boat builders doing inexpensive and pretty shoddy work. I tried to find out more about why that was true, but from the comments in large part have concluded that Crealock was a competent design who worked quick and inexpensively in the early years of his career. And while Crealock was competent, his work never achieved the sophistication of the better designers of that era such as S&S, C&C, Phil Rhodes, Bill Luders, Bill Lapworth, or Bill Trip to name a few. Nor did he have the instinctual creativity of designers like Charley Morgan. The Columbia 22 was a nice design for its day. From a design standpoint it would make a nice daysailer and overnighter. It was a pretty advanced design in terms of its keel and rudder shape, and it had decent sail proportions for that era. That said it had its idiosyncrasies related to being a MORC boat from a very brief moment in MORC history. To explain, while MORC boats of the era where generally more stable than CCA boats, that was not the Columbia 22 was not necessarily an especially stable design for a variety of reasons. Although the MORC rule of that era produced boats that were generally well rounded designs that were largely free of distortions to the hull to beat the rule, designers none the less tried to find ways to design boats which were faster than the MORC rule thought that the boat would be. Bill Crealock, like other West Coast designers of the era, were experimenting with minimizing wetted surface as a way to reduce drag. The Columbia 22 as a pretty extreme example of this in that it had nearly cylindrical hull sections. Hull sections like these lower the vertical center of buoyancy and reduce form stability to nearly zero. As we now know, reasonable amounts of form stability improve roll motion comfort (less roll angle and softer transitions), produce a more useful stability curve, and sail carrying capacity, and generally produces a better sailing boats. In the absence of a reasonable amount of form stability, a whole lot more ballast is required. But also by lowering the vertical center of buoyancy there was also a lesser righting moment produced further requiring a higher ballast ratio to obtain a similar stability. It is my understanding that the Columbia 22 was originally designed to have 1100 lb lead keel, and depending on the source, the first boats were built with the lead keel. As I understand it pretty early on Columbia switched to an iron keel that was shaped identically to the lead keel. Iron weighs about 2/3 of what lead weighs per cubic foot and so its unclear whether the 1100 lb ballast weight actually represents the weight of the iron keel. That makes sense since later versions of the 22 list the ballast at around 800 lbs. But in any event, iron's lower density means that its impact on stability would be less (because its vertical center of gravity would be higher than that of an identical weight lead keel). and so again a higher ballast ratio would be warranted to achieve the originally intended stability. While these are nice boats in most ways, there are a couple more words of caution. Columbia (especially in this period) was a pioneer in shoddy glass work and cost cutting details. The hull to deck joints and mast support structures were particularly vulnerable. If I remember right, the iron keels were bolted with steel keel bolts that would be well past their use-by dates (if they have not been changed in the past 10-25 years) and will be in need of changing. (i.e. big job but easier and cheaper than other types of keel bolt replacements). Because Columbia had pretty lax quality control, I would also be very suspicious of the overall displacement quoted for these boats. Even with decent quality control, boats this size can be hundreds of pounds over their published weights making a ballast to displacement ratio pretty suspect on this boat. Lastly, while these boats sail well, you asked about the CCA rule I assume out of curiosity about relative performance. The current racing 'handicap' rule that is most common in the US is PHRF, and it is a pretty good gauge of performance relative to other boats. When compared to similar designs of that era, the Columbia 22 with a PHRF rating of 273 offered pretty mid-pack performance with boats like the Cal 21 being 15 seconds a mile faster (that is actually pretty significant in real life) and boats like the Sailmaster 22 being 21 seconds a mile slower. Of course these boats were much slower than the boats that followed them. As a point of comparison, the J-22 (designed to a much later MORC rule) is 96 seconds faster, and a very modern similar size boat like a J-70 rates 144 seconds a mile faster. But absolute speed does not matter much for daysailing and while the Columbia 22 is a pretty slow boat for its size, it none the less sails well enough that it should be fine for your purposes, assuming that it is in decent structural condition. (I apologize that some of this was written for an earlier review that I had written on this boat.) Jeff  

Jeff... thanks for the lengthy discourse... but I don't understand everything you said. But the synopsis might be that the Col 22 "might" be a decent ocean daysailer for where I live? It is the Columbia 22's ballast/displacement ratio of about 50% that is attractive to me. The Col 23's is about 35%. Doesn't that mean that the Col 22 would be more stable/seaworthy than the 23? overbored above said that a "mast head rig can also be a handful when the wind blows". Is that saying that a fractional sloop would be a better design in windy areas?  

The bottom line is that: 1) the published 50% ratio may not accurately represent the actual ballast to displacement ratio, 2) a 50% ballast ratio (vs 35%) does not necessarily translate into more stability depending on hull shape, draft, ballast density, 3) Columbia were very poorly built in the 1960's so could need massive rebuilding, 4) That the Columbia 23 was not especially stable but might seem more stable as compared to the Columbia 22 since it has a smaller sail area to displacement ratio, 4) that a fractional rig might be easier to handle in the high breezes. That said, with the higher SA/D of the Columbia 22, you might be able to get by with less overlap on the genoa and so might be similar to handle, and 5) The Colombia 22 is not a bad daysailer. Jeff  

OK Jeff... I think I have the gist of what you are saying. So, with that... ...can you suggest any 22-23 footers that are better constructed boats that I could be looking for? I can't go with anything built this century... finances just won't allow it. Tanzer 22 ? Alberg Sea Sprite 23 ? Bristol 22 ? Edel 665 ? There's a Columbia Challenger 24 for sale in the PNW, but that's getting a bit too big for what I can handle/tow. Again, I'm looking for an ocean daysailer. A boat that can handle some wind and waves. Thanks.  

columbia 22 sailboat interior

hnash53 said: There's a Columbia Challenger 24 for sale in the PNW, but that's getting a bit too big for what I can handle/tow. Again, I'm looking for an ocean daysailer. A boat that can handle some wind and waves. Thanks. Click to expand...

Of that list, if by Bristol 22 you are referring to a keel version of the Halsey Herreshoff designed Bristol 22 that is a lovely boat. (There was an Alberg designed 22 footer sometimes called a Bristol 22 that I don't particularly like.) If there is a shortcoming to the Bristol it has a transom notch for the outboard and so the cockpit can flood from an overtaking wave. It least the companionway sill is pretty high so you are not likely to downflood, unlike the Columbia 22 which has an outboard well in the cockpit and a low companionway sill which puts it at greater risk of swamping. The Columbia is a faster boat, but would feel a lot more tippy. The Tanzer 22 is also a nice daysailer, seemingly well built. I raced one of those back in the 1990's. They sail very well. My recollection is that there is less accommodations down below on them. One of my favorite boats of this general size is the Ranger 23. They sail very well and seemed to be well constructed. I have sailed them in some tough going and the boat did extremely well. They are more spartan down below than the Columbia, Tanzer or Bristol. Another great boat in this size range was the Northstar 727. I owned a larger version of this boat and a Northstar 500 also built by Hughes. Hughes had a very high build quality. The accommodations were about on a par with the Ranger 23 but a little nicer in fit and finish. Jeff  

Also... there are lots of Santana's up here, too.  

I am a big fan of the Santana 23 K which was the keel version of the Santana 23 D. These are very nice MORC boats in terms of performance but are very spartan down below, and the rudder design always looked vulnerable. I personally like the 23 D version, but that had a lot less stability. The Santana 22 was also a very nice MORC design. I don't think that I have ever seen one in real life so I can't comment on the build quality. Design wise they are a close cousin to the Ranger 23 which is one of my favorite boats of this general size. I would stay away from the Santana 20.  

columbia 22 sailboat interior

hnash53 said: "The Columbia 22 is a light displacement midget ocean racer..." Click to expand...
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Columbia 21--?

  • Thread starter michael mauri
  • Start date Mar 1, 2002
  • Brand-Specific Forums

michael mauri

Hello, I am looking at a Columbia to buy. The owner says it is a 22'(rare)made for only one or two years. The cabin windows are round, not rectangular. My sailing experience consists of sabots, sunfish and hobie cats. This would be quite a step up, but it looks like a fast boat. Does anybody have experience of this hull(good, bad or otherwise). What should I look at closely before buying(weak points). Any comments are welcome. Thanks  

Michael Andersen

C-22 to buy I would check for the Columbia name plate located in the V-birth on the starboard side just aft of the head to make sure it is a Columbia. I own the 64th one made with an all wood interior( No liner) I also have no Stove and no Dinette just two Settee's one to port and one to starboard. At a recent Columbia rendezvous where I was able to speak with Mr. Dick Valdez the man who started Columbia Yachts and he told me that only the very early ones had a all wood interior the rest had liners built in and they all came with the standerd interior which had a Dinette to port, a stove and ice box to starboard which had a single birth that went under the cockpit, with a v-berth forward with the head located there as well. All the exteriors were the same. So the windows would lead me to think you are not looking at a Columbia. In order for your boat to have round windows it means they would have had to change molds (not likely) and the 21 did not have a cabin top.  

Thomas A Adams

looking at one myself I am going tolook at a Columbia 22 in a week. I talked to the owner and he said it points to the wind very well. He also stated that it takes five foot seas without a problem. Nice boat to sail. Hope this helps. I think it will be a good boat to buy. I have done quite a bit of study on on the columbia class and they get good reviews.  

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IMAGES

  1. Columbia 22, 1969, Dayton, Texas sailboat for sale

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  2. Columbia 22, 1969, Dayton, Texas sailboat for sale

    columbia 22 sailboat interior

  3. Columbia 22 sailboat for sale

    columbia 22 sailboat interior

  4. Columbia 22 Interior Arrangement Plan

    columbia 22 sailboat interior

  5. 1970 Columbia 22‘ sailboat for Sale in Tacoma, WA

    columbia 22 sailboat interior

  6. 1970 Columbia 22‘ sailboat for Sale in Tacoma, WA

    columbia 22 sailboat interior

VIDEO

  1. COBIA 262 CC BOAT / HAULOVER INLET

  2. #23 Raising Hull to Bottom Paint Catalina 22

  3. Columbia 22 Sailboat vs Model on Cube

  4. 2023 Bavaria C42

  5. Sailboat on Columbia River, Hawks Nest!!

  6. How to Replace Rotted Boat Trailer Bunk Boards

COMMENTS

  1. COLUMBIA 22

    40 to 50 indicates a heavy bluewater boat; over 50 indicates an extremely heavy bluewater boat. Comfort ratio = D ÷ (.65 x (.7 LWL + .3 LOA) x Beam^1.33), where displacement is expressed in pounds, and length is expressed in feet. Capsize Screening Formula (CSF): Designed to determine if a boat has blue water capability.

  2. Columbia 22

    The Columbia 22 is an American trailerable sailboat that was designed by William Crealock and first built in 1966. [1] [2] [3] The Columbia 22 design was developed into the Coronado 23 , with the addition of a new coach house roof design.

  3. Columbia 22' Restoration

    Location: crystal river florida. Boat: 1967 Columbia 22' & 1976 Compac 16'. Posts: 7. Images: 2. I cleaned up most of the water out of the bilges and took lots of new pictures here is the link!! 1967 Columbia 22 project sailboat pictures by mattt6511 - Photobucket. 05-02-2013, 23:38. # 9. Vida Pura 777.

  4. Columbia 22 Manual/Blueprints

    Columbia 22 22 Bellingham, WA. Jul 20, 2018. #12. Some updates (since I was seeking a rudder head for a Columbia 22) 1. The fastest I've been able to make my boat go was 9.5kts in 18kt winds (def. the max) 2. Dear Andy Whiley past away several years ago.

  5. COLUMBIA 22: Reviews, Specifications, Built, Engine

    If you are a boat enthusiast looking to get more information on specs, built, make, etc. of different boats, then here is a complete review of COLUMBIA 22. Built by Columbia Yachts and designed by William Crealock, the boat was first built in 1966. It has a hull type of Fin w/spade rudder and LOA is 6.71. Its sail area/displacement ratio 22.00.

  6. columbia 22

    Gary Esterly. Sep 20, 2003. #3. Fellow Columbia 22 owner from Shelton, Wa. I saw your note about your Columbia 22 and thought I would drop you a line. I own a Columbia 22 as well and I live in Shelton, Washington. I was wondering what upgrades & improvements you have made and if you have had much of a chance to sail your boat.

  7. Columbia 22

    Columbia 22 is a 22′ 0″ / 6.7 m monohull sailboat designed by William Crealock and built by Columbia Yachts between 1966 and 1972. ... The lower a boat's ratio is, the less power it takes to drive the boat to its nominal hull speed or beyond. Read more. Formula. D/L = (D ÷ 2240) ÷ (0.01 x LWL)³ D: Displacement of the boat in pounds. LWL ...

  8. Columbia 22

    The Columbia 22 is a 22.0ft masthead sloop designed by William Crealock and built in fiberglass by Columbia Yachts between 1966 and 1972. 1541 units have been built. The Columbia 22 is a light sailboat which is a very high performer. It is very stable / stiff and has a low righting capability if capsized. It is best suited as a racing boat.

  9. Columbia 22 Sailboat Photo Gallery

    Columbia 22 Sailboat pictures, a collection of Columbia 22 sailboats with specifications and photos. Columbia 22 Sailboat Photo Gallery: Home: Lessons: Rentals: How To: Forums: Videos: Texas Regattas: Bookstore: Search: ... 1969 Columbia 22, Fort Worth Boat Club (Eagle Mtn lake), Texas, $2000

  10. Columbia 22 Interior Arrangement Plan

    Columbia. All Models; Columbia 21; Columbia 22; Columbia T23; Columbia 24; Columbia 7.6 [25'] Columbia 26 Mark II; Columbia T26; Columbia 8.3 [27'] Columbia 28; Columbia 29; Columbia 29 Mark II; Columbia 8.7 [29'] Columbia 30; Columbia 9.6 [32'] Columbia 34 Mark II; Columbia 36; Columbia 39; Columbia 40; Columbia 41; Columbia 43; Columbia 45 ...

  11. Columbia 22 Sailboat values and recent boats for sale

    The Columbia 22 was built by Columbia Yachts in the United States from 1966 until 1972, with 1,541 boats completed. A number of boats were sold as kits for amateur construction, under the name of Sailcrafter Custom Yachts. ... The keel-equipped version of the boat has a draft of 3.17 ft (0.97 m), while the centreboard-equipped version has a ...

  12. 1968 Columbia 22 sailboat for sale in Texas

    22'. 7'9'. 3'2'. Texas. $4,500. Description: This Columbia 22 is a production sailboat built in 1968 during the heyday of fiberglass sailboats. The Columbia company's William B Crealock design is noted for its, high performance, thicker fiberglass, and heavier standing rigging. As a daysailer, the Columbia 22 has many beneficial features ...

  13. Columbia 22?

    QLD. 1560 posts. 8 Jun 2020 2:06PM. Columbia 22 was built by International Marine Scoresby Melb. ,now called Caribbean along side. Columbia 27 , 34 and the Bertram range of motor yachts. High quality build ( not to a price) and with high disp./ ballast ratio of around 50% ,great for family to learn how to sail and potter around in .

  14. First boat: Columbia 22 or Columbia 24?

    The 24 has new hull paint, decent condition sales, full electronics, decent motor, dodger, new lines, etc. Its about 1,700. The 22 needs a full new coat of paint, possibly new gel coat on the deck, has no electronics, has a torn mainsail, needs new jibs, and has an older motor. It can be had for maybe 500, or maybe even free, possibly.

  15. 1968 Columbia 22

    Boat is located in CORPUS CHRISTI, Texas. This Columbia 22 is a production sailboat built in 1968 during the heyday of fiberglass sailboats. The Columbia companys William B Crealock design is noted for its, high performance, thicker fiberglass, and heavier standing rigging. As a daysailer, the Columbia 22 has many beneficial features usually ...

  16. Columbia 22 mast

    966 posts · Joined 2008. #13 · Dec 13, 2008. I took down the 35 foot, 100 lb mast on my Etap 26 a few weeks ago, by myself. I made an A frame from two 2x4s joined at the top by a large T hinge, about $20 total. I stood it on the bow of the boat, tied the bottom ends of the 2x4s to the toe rail.

  17. Columbia 22 Interior Elevation & Plan

    Blueprint COPY Plan Date: 1968 Size: 44 x 32. Latest News. New Brochures Added. New brochures added for Boston Whaler, Sea Sprite, Seaway, Silverline & Ski Supreme

  18. Our Columbia 22 Refit

    Our Columbia 22 Refit We have a Columbia 22 sailboat. This blog details our progress through its restoration. Neither of us are shipwrights, but we have good advice and are both avid sailors. Sunday, May 14, 2006. What else have we been up to? ...

  19. Columbia 23T as a first real sailboat?

    Catalina 22 For a first sailboat, I'd go with a more mainstream choice - You'll eventually want to step up and the C22 will be easier to sell. There have been over 15,000 Catalina 22's sold and there is a well developed owners support group for this boat while the Columbia 22 is less well known because its' production run was just a little over 1500.

  20. I need to understand a CCA rating for a Columbia 22

    The Columbia 22 was the first production boat designed by Bill Crealock, who went on to be an extremely prolific designer and eventually a very respected designer. In the early days, Crealock mostly provided services to boat builders doing inexpensive and pretty shoddy work. I tried to find out more about why that was true, but from the ...

  21. Columbia 21--?

    Mar 1, 2002. #1. Hello, I am looking at a Columbia to buy. The owner says it is a 22' (rare)made for only one or two years. The cabin windows are round, not rectangular. My sailing experience consists of sabots, sunfish and hobie cats. This would be quite a step up, but it looks like a fast boat.