How Much Does a New York Yacht Club Membership Cost?

The New York Yacht Club, said to be the best club in the world by sailors, is located in New York City and New Port, Rhode Island.  It was founded in 1844 by a group of yachtsmen at the time.

The club was established in 1844, making it one of the oldest clubs in New York.

To date, the club has more than 3,000 members, and membership to the club is by invitation only.

A Very Expensive Boat by foilman, on Flickr

How much does a New York Yacht Club membership cost?

Being a private club, the fees are not publically known, but from our research from third-party sources, we found the membership fees are said to be said to be low $xx,xxx annually and the initiation dues are said to be less than $25,000.  These are estimates given by a third-party source and cannot be deemed accurate.  Refer to the club for more information on the exact pricing.

To join the club, a potential member has to be nominated by a current club member, and as a requirement, the applicant needs to have applicable boating experience and three letters of recommendations.  If approved for membership, the new member is allowed to attend a reception ceremony at the Harbor Court, weather permitting in spring or at the clubhouse at 44th street in the fall.  To read more about the club’s application procedure and by-laws, you can refer to this official PDF.

New York Yacht Club overview

The headquarters offers high-end dining options, patios and libraries filled with books from floor to ceiling, according to Investopedia .  As per BusinessInsider.com , the primary clubhouse also features the  Model Room , which is a room featuring a massive display of model ships.

Tips to know

The club’s headquarters, a six-story stone-front building, is located on 44th street in Manhattan.  Aside from this location, as mentioned, the club offers a located on the water in Newport, Rhode Island.

The club is known for starting the  Americas Cup  yacht race.

54 percent of the members are yacht owners as per the official brochure.  Of these, 1,116 are sailboards and 614 are powerboats.  The rest are yachts ranging from 22 to 289 feet long.

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How Much Does New York Yacht Club Membership Cost?

Founded in 1844 by a group of yachtsmen of the time, the New York Yacht Club is one of the oldest clubs in New York. Sailors say that this is the best yachting club in the world. It is located in New Port, Rhode Island, and New York City.

By now, the club has more than three thousand members and the membership is available only by invitation.

 How Much Does New York Yacht Club Membership Cost?

The costs for joining the New York Yacht Club are not publicly available because this is a private club. However, based on our research, the initiation fee is less than $26,000 , while the annual membership fees are pretty low as well. These are just some estimates offered by a third-party source and can not be considered accurate. You should contact the club directly to find out more information about the exact costs.

According to several websites, the cost of membership depends on the one you choose as the club offers multiple options, including honorary, regular, junior, and intermediate membership. For instance, the Regular Membership is the most expensive one, with annual dues of $12,000 and an initiation fee of $26,000 .

The Intermediate Membership is only available for those who are between 21 and 39 years old and has annual costs of $6,000 and an initiation fee of $7,500. The Junior Membership is available only if you are under 21 years old. The annual costs for this membership level are $1,000 and the initiation fee is $1,000 as well. The Honorary Membership is available only by invitation and does not require annual dues or an initiation fee.

About the New York Yacht Club and Clubhouse

According to the Investopedia.com website, the headquarters provides high-end dining options, libraries filled with many books, and patios.

You might also like our articles on the cost of membership at the Freedom Boat Club , Ocean Reef Club , or Carefree Boat Club .

Also, according to BusinessInsider.com, the primary clubhouse has a Model Room, that features a very large display of model ships.

The New York Yacht Club is known for starting the Americas Cup yacht race.

The headquarters of the New York Yacht Club is located on 44 th Street in Manhattan, in a six-story stone-front building. As we mentioned above, aside from this location, the club has one more location on the water in Newport, Rhode Island.

Important things to consider

NY Yacht Club Inside

Also, you will be required to have three letters of recommendation and applicable boating experience. If you are approved for membership, you will be allowed to attend a reception ceremony organized at the New York Harbor Court, in spring if the weather permits it, or in the fall at the Clubhouse at 44 th Street.

Usually, there is a waiting list for the New York Yacht Club membership, particularly for the Regular Membership. The length of the waiting list would vary depending on the type of membership and other factors.

As a member of the New York Yacht Club , you will have several benefits such as access to the facilities of the club, which include sailing centers, dining rooms, meeting rooms, and a bar. Also, you will get access to the Club’s art collection, impressive library, and archives. Moreover, the Club organizes several social events throughout the year, including receptions, regattas, and dinners.

You can transfer your New York Yacht Club Membership to somebody else, but the transfer process must be approved by the Board of Directors. There is a transfer fee that is based on the current membership value and must be paid by the new member.

In general, refunds and cancellations are not available as membership in this club is a binding commitment. However, in some specific situations, such as a significant change in a member’s financial situation or a move to a distant location, the membership can be canceled.

The club has a formal dress code, especially in the dining areas. Women should wear suits or dresses, while men should wear ties and jackets.

According to the official club’s brochure, 54% of the members own a yacht. 614 out of these are powerboats and 1,116 are sailboards. The rest of these are yachts with a length that ranges from 22 to 289 feet.

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new york yacht club annual dues

How Much Does a New York Yacht Club Membership Cost?

Frequently asked questions, what are the benefits of becoming a member of the new york yacht club, what is the process for becoming a member of the new york yacht club, what is the dress code at the new york yacht club, what is the minimum age for membership in the new york yacht club, what is the expected time commitment for membership in the new york yacht club, is there a waiting list for membership in the new york yacht club, what are the requirements for intermediate membership in the new york yacht club, what is the process for transferring a membership in the new york yacht club, what is the policy on cancellations and refunds for memberships in the new york yacht club, is there a discount for military veterans in the new york yacht club, what is the role of the new york yacht club in the sailing community, what is the new york yacht club foundation, what is the history of the new york yacht club.

If you are thinking about joining the New York Yacht Club, you are probably wondering how much it costs to become a member. The answer is that it depends on the type of membership you are interested in and the initiation fee, which varies depending on factors such as age, military service, and connections to existing members.

The New York Yacht Club offers several types of membership, including regular, intermediate, junior, and honorary. Regular membership is the most expensive, with an initiation fee of $150,000 and annual dues of $12,000. Intermediate membership has a lower initiation fee of $7,500 and annual dues of $6,000, but is only available to those between the ages of 21 and 39. Junior membership has an initiation fee of $1,000 and annual dues of $1,000, but is only available to those under the age of 21. Honorary membership is by invitation only and does not require an initiation fee or annual dues.

Membership in the New York Yacht Club comes with a number of benefits, including access to the Club’s facilities, which include dining rooms, bars, meeting rooms, and sailing centers. Members also have access to the Club’s extensive library, archives, and art collection. In addition, the Club organizes numerous social events throughout the year, including regattas, dinners, and receptions.

The process for becoming a member of the New York Yacht Club begins with a nomination by an existing member. The nomination must be supported by at least four other members and include a statement of the nominee’s qualifications. After the nomination is received, the Membership Committee reviews it and determines whether to invite the nominee to submit an application. The application must be accompanied by letters of recommendation and other supporting documents. The Membership Committee then reviews the application and makes a recommendation to the Board of Directors, which has final approval.

The dress code at the New York Yacht Club is formal, especially in the dining areas. Men are expected to wear jackets and ties, while women are expected to wear dresses or suits.

The minimum age for regular membership in the New York Yacht Club is 40. However, there are other types of membership, including intermediate and junior memberships, that are available to younger individuals.

Membership in the New York Yacht Club requires a significant time commitment, particularly for those who are involved in sailing activities. Members are expected to participate in regattas and other events, and to contribute to the Club’s activities and programs.

Yes, there is usually a waiting list for membership in the New York Yacht Club, particularly for regular membership. The length of the waiting list varies depending on the type of membership and other factors.

To be eligible for intermediate membership in the New York Yacht Club, an individual must be between the ages of 21 and 39 and have a sponsor who is a regular member of the Club. Intermediate members have full access to the Club’s facilities and events, but are not eligible to vote or hold office.

Memberships in the New York Yacht Club are transferable, but the transfer process is subject to approval by the Board of Directors. The transfer fee is based on the current value of the membership and is paid by the new member.

Membership in the New York Yacht Club is a binding commitment, and cancellations and refunds are not generally available. However, there are some circumstances under which a member may be released from the commitment, such as a move to a distant location or a significant change in financial circumstances.

Yes, military veterans are eligible for a discount on the initiation fee for regular membership in the New York Yacht Club. The discount is based on the individual’s length of military service.

The New York Yacht Club is one of the most prestigious and influential sailing clubs in the world. The Club has a long history of promoting excellence in sailing and has been involved in many important events and initiatives in the sailing community, including the America’s Cup and the U.S. Sailing Team.

The New York Yacht Club Foundation is a charitable organization that is dedicated to supporting sailing and marine conservation initiatives. The Foundation provides funding for a variety of programs and projects, including youth sailing programs, sailing education, and marine science research.

The New York Yacht Club was founded in 1844 and quickly became one of the most influential and prestigious sailing clubs in the world. The Club has played a significant role in the development of sailing as a sport and has been involved in many important events and initiatives in the sailing community. The Club’s facilities, which include its iconic clubhouse in New York City and several sailing centers throughout the United States, are among the finest in the world.

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Thank you for your interest in the Lake Norman Yacht Club! LNYC is a sailing club for members of all experience levels. Our mission is to promote the sport of sailing, both recreational cruising and racing. We have an active keelboat fleet, and our junior program is one of the strongest in the southeast! 

If you haven't already been to the club, we highly recommend coming to visit for a tour or one of the many events this season. We do have a limited number of club-owned boats that members can use, including a Highlander, a Flying Scot, a San Juan 21, and 420s and Vanguard 15s (420s and V15s belong to the junior program, but adults use them too). For any of these boats, you would contact the captain for that particular fleet and they will check you out on the boat and have you sign any associated waivers. 

Membership Types There are two types of membership, Associate and Resident, available to New Members.   

Associate members can enjoy full use of the property, including the pavilion, clubhouse, swimming area, and launch ramps. The biggest difference is that Associate members are not permitted to keep boats on the property. Associate members can attend all the annual meetings of the club, but in the case of a vote, they do not have the opportunity to vote. Of course, they can contribute to the discussion!  Resident members have a vote in any situations that might arise during annual meetings, and they can keep property on the property, including boats on trailers in dry storage, a sailboat in a slip, or a camper in one of our campsites.  Resident membership includes one dry storage space for a sailboat. Powerboat dry storage incurs additional fees. Slip space is for sailboats only and involves additional fees. Slips are limited and there may be a waiting list.

For either type of membership, you'll have a one-time initiation fee and then annual dues. Your dues are prorated from the date your membership is approved by the board of directors.  In addition, all club members have the responsibility to serve on race committee. This means you will go out and help run races on a weekend of your choice. You'll sign up for duty and the PRO (principal race officer - the person in charge of the racing) will reach out to you so she/he can assign you a role that you feel comfortable with doing. Running races takes a few people who know racing very well, but also takes many people who don't have to have an extensive knowledge of racing. Secondly, since we're an all-volunteer club,  members are asked to come out and help at one of the club workdays or complete a club project on their own time. If LNYC sounds like the right fit for you, please apply by clicking here .

If you have more questions before you decide, please contact our membership chair at  [email protected] .  She will be happy to assist you!

Last updated 8:34pm on 31 May 2023

new york yacht club annual dues

How Much Do Yacht Club Memberships Cost? (5 Helpful Examples)

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Joining a yacht club is an important milestone in your life. It marks a certain degree of success and allows you to enjoy plenty of luxurious amenities. Setting sail on a yacht is the ultimate way to unwind from a hectic work week while you try to climb the corporate ladder.

Fortunately, there are yacht clubs all over the country that would love to welcome you as a brand-new member. You can enjoy an afternoon on the water with a beautiful yacht in exchange for a small sum of money.

But how much do Yacht Club memberships generally cost?

Prices for Yacht Clubs will vary based on your location, the fleet, and even the amenities that are offered at the marina. The average annual membership price is between $900-$4,000 depending on your level of luxury and needs.

To give you an idea of what you could expect to pay for your yacht club membership, here are some numbers gathered from across the country:

Table of Contents

new york yacht club annual dues

What Does Each Yacht Club Offer?

Each yacht club is going to offer something that sets it apart from the others on this listing. To give you a better idea of where your money is going, here is a brief synopsis of what you can expect at each location.

Related Article: How Much Does Yacht Insurance Cost? (4 Examples)

Charleston Yacht Club

Charleston is a premier cruising destination with plenty of waterways for you to explore. They offer a launch hoist, dry slips, day dockage, free parking, and a long list of events scheduled throughout the year.

You also gain privileges at other yacht clubs around the world. If you don’t own your own yacht, they have plenty of members who often have room on their boats to accommodate a few extra passengers.

Florida Yacht Club

The Florida Yacht Club is a relatively exclusive club that features amazing amenities like fine dining and an array of aquatic activities.

You can play tennis, enjoy a spa treatment or massage, or get in a rousing game of croquet from the shore. They also host events and permit you to extend your privileges to other locations scattered around the Florida coast.

Atlanta Yacht Club

The Atlanta Yacht Club is primarily geared toward sailors who are interested in racing. They have a fleet of more than thirty different boats that are designed to help you further your knowledge of sailing.

If you still have a lot to learn, you can even take classes at this location. Prospective members must be sponsored and co-sponsored by two club members for entrance.

Related Article: 7 Boat Clubs in Florida You Should Know (Before Choosing)

Chicago Yacht Club

Members of the Chicago Yacht Club will find plenty of opportunities to get involved. With more than forty different committees, you can find a circle of friends that have common interests beyond just sailing and racing.

You also receive transient docking at both the Belmont and Monroe harbors, exclusive invites to private events, and reciprocity at more than 900 clubs across the country.

Related Article: Boat Clubs in Boston: 5 Clubs You Should Know

California Yacht Club

The California Yacht Club is home to both national and world championship regattas.

They host plenty of events from scuba club to book club to wine tastings. If you want to find a true community of like-minded sailors, this could be the place for you.

One of the best features is the reciprocity at locations not just across the United States but across the world. You can feel free to travel the world with your yacht and experience some of the same fellowship globally.

Related Article: Boat Clubs In Los Angeles: 7 Clubs You Should Know

What are the Cheapest Yacht Clubs?

The cheapest yacht clubs charge just under $1,000 per year for membership. While this does give you access to different types of experiences, you may be disappointed by the overall amenities.

Some yacht clubs are known for their extravagant country club styles that help you to embrace a particular lifestyle. They include Olympic-sized swimming pools, state-of-the-art tennis courts, and fine dining.

Everything has a beautiful waterfront view. It can feel like you are in the middle of an idyllic paradise without ever even having to leave the shore. If this is what you can gain from the most expensive yacht clubs, you should set your expectations much lower for the cheaper yacht clubs.

The cheaper yacht clubs lack the community aspect of these exclusive options. They feature dry slips and the occasional party, but not much more.

Some of them may have the feel of a county park with some picnic benches, outdoor grills, and a moderately sized swimming pool. Expect a much more casual atmosphere when you choose to go with a cheaper yacht club.

It is even possible that they are simply “paper yacht clubs” that do not even maintain a physical building of their own.

How Much Do the Most Expensive Yacht Clubs Cost to Join?

The most expensive yacht clubs can vary a great deal in price. Most of them will cost between $3,000 and $4,000 per year. However, you can certainly find more exclusive clubs that will cost above and beyond this.

Keep in mind that these more expensive clubs generally are not open to the public. They are offered by invitation only and you must have a member sponsor you to be considered for entrance.

When you are paying for a more expensive yacht club, you should make sure that you are really going to get your money’s worth. These expensive clubs promote a certain type of elegant lifestyle.

Make sure that you are planning to take advantage of all the amenities available from one of these clubs before you sink too much money into the membership fees. The social aspect of these expensive yacht clubs is extremely important.

If you plan to simply rent a boat from time to time, you might be able to go with a cheaper yacht club.

Related Article: How Long Do Sailboats Last?

What Is Generally Included in the Membership Fee for Yacht Clubs?

Have you been wondering why you should join a yacht club? Many potential members want to know what they can expect from their membership fees before they commit to a year-long contract. There are many advantages to signing up for a membership with a well-known yacht club.

Amenities and Activities

First and foremost, you get access to activities and cruises planned by board members. These might be various sailing activities, dinners, get-togethers, tennis matches, or other events that take up a lazy Sunday afternoon.

You also gain access to any amenities that surround the yacht club’s marina. For many programs, this means a fitness center, pool, and tennis courts. Several locations also offer fine dining, meeting rooms, and more.

It is like a private oasis where you can get away from the hustle and bustle of the regular world. Time moves slowly when you’re enjoying the amenities here.

Many yacht clubs have programs that introduce children (and adults!) to sailing. Take classes to learn more about improving your technique, sailing safety, and other important aspects of life on the open water.

Access to the Fleet

The main reason why most people join yacht clubs is to be able to rent out boats instead of purchasing their own. Joining a yacht club may give you access to an entire fleet of yachts that can be reserved for a day or weeks at a time. Some yacht clubs allow you to rent boats for up to ten days at a time.

Others do not allow you to rent out ships. They are primarily geared toward individuals who already own a yacht or will own a yacht in the future. Make sure you know the difference in advance.

new york yacht club annual dues

Are There any Additional Costs Besides the Membership Fees?

Unfortunately, the membership fees are not the only cost associated with joining a yacht club. Most of the clubs in the United States also have a one-time initial fee that tends to cost thousands of dollars. Many will range from $1,500 to $5,000 depending on the location and the exclusivity of the yacht club.

This one-time fee should be the only additional money you pay except for fuel. Most yacht clubs do not cover the cost of the fuel used in the ship during your rental if renting is an option. Be prepared for what this could cost you.

If you cause damage to the ship, you can also expect some out-of-pocket costs. Insurance should cover the damage, but you will likely be asked to cover the cost of the deductible.

Be sure to inquire about how much you may be on the hook for before you sign up for any particular yacht club. Accidents can happen, even to the most experienced sailors. Make sure that you can afford the mishap in advance.

Is a Yacht Club Membership Right for You?

Understanding what the real cost of a yacht club membership is can be the first step toward determining if this is right for you. Many people love the luxuries available through the more expensive yacht clubs, but they may not be able to afford it. Consider what is most important in a club to you before deciding to sign on the dotted line for an annual membership.

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A Tale of Two Shorelines

By Carin Rubenstein

  • Aug. 31, 2003

AT the Larchmont Yacht Club one day not long ago, near the wide veranda of an elaborate Victorian clubhouse overlooking Long Island Sound, well-dressed parents and well-mannered children chatted on the deck of a sparkling pool. In the seawater below, boats rocked gently on the tide as further out in the haze, in a scene that might have been a backdrop in an F. Scott Fitzgerald novel, a flotilla of sailboats raced in distant circles.

It was not quite as Gatsby-esque on an overcast Saturday at the minuscule Hudson River beach at the Philipse Manor Beach Club in Sleepy Hollow, just behind the Metro-North railroad station. There, a man wearing scruffy black water shoes climbed into a shiny white kayak and pushed off the muddy bank, while a pregnant woman played with her cranky 4-year-old in the coarse, sticky sand just north of the Tappan Zee bridge. Lifeguards watched languidly as a smattering of members ate at picnic tables, read or docked a small powerboat.

Westchester is surrounded by water and boats, and devotees of each side tend to resemble baseball fans who can root for the Mets or the Yankees, but never both.

The two shores have many differences: The Long Island Sound side features exclusive yacht clubs and big boats, as well as pollution caused by sewage runoff that causes sporadic beach closings. The Hudson River side is characterized more by simpler boat clubs and smaller sailboats, plus silted-in marinas, industrial pollution and several high-profile organizations devoted to cleaning up the river.

Beyond the navigation and pollution differences caused by the two shores' distinctly different physical features, each side has its own culture, the Long Island Sound side boasting something of a Gold Coast feel, and the Hudson side with a more economically diverse river-town culture.

On the Long Island Sound side of Westchester, there are about 40 marinas and yacht clubs, as well as 25 beaches, said Kimberly Zimmer, public outreach coordinator for the Long Island Sound Study at SUNY Stony Brook. From Pelham Manor to Port Chester, the wavy shoreline runs about 36 miles, she said. The harbors, on the whole, are deeper on the sound than they are on the river, and thus they tend to attract bigger boats.

On the Hudson River side of Westchester, there are 22 marinas and boat clubs and four separate beaches, the highest concentration anywhere on the river, said John Lipscomb, a boat captain for Riverkeeper, an environmental organization based in Garrison. From Yonkers to the Bear Mountain Bridge, the craggy Hudson River shoreline stretches 62 miles, said John W. Ladd, a board member of the Hudson River Environmental Society.

Water recreation on the New York portion of the Long Island Sound coastline, which includes southern Westchester to Montauk, may generate as much as $1.2 billion in revenue annually, about one quarter of which is spent in Westchester County, according to an estimate by Chris Squeri, executive director of the New York Marine Trades Association in Amityville.

A total of 14,064 boats were registered to Westchester County residents in 2001, the sixth highest county total in the state, according to the most recent data available, provided by Jennifer Morris, a spokeswoman for the Department of Motor Vehicles in Albany. (The leaders, in order, are Suffolk and Nassau counties on Long Island, Monroe County on Lake Ontario, Erie County on Lake Erie and Onondaga County on Oneida Lake.)

''Boating is perceived to be a small industry, but it really isn't,'' said Ginny DiForio of the Hudson Valley Marine Trades Association in West Haverstraw. ''People don't realize how much business it generates.''

Most water lovers are attached to one side or the other, either by geography or by convenience. The contest about which shore is better is ''the age-old question,'' said to Brian Plotkin, 24, who spends a great deal of time on his family's 48-foot power boat and helps his brother, Steve, run the Half Moon Bay Marina, on the Hudson side in Croton.

Mr. Plotkin is that rare, bi-coastal boater, a guy who docks on the Hudson but drives over to the Long Island Sound. This is no small decision, since it takes nearly $100 worth of fuel to get his three floating bedrooms and two baths to the other side.

But he enjoys his weekly trips, he said, because ''there's more to do on the sound, it has more coves and more restaurants.'' Also, his large boat is more well-suited to the wide-open Long Island Sound than to the relatively narrow Hudson, he said, echoing a common view that big boats belong on the sound.

Still, Mr. Plotkin and his boat, ''Never Enough,'' sleep on the Hudson. ''The Hudson River is very calm and easy and I always get a sense of relief when I turn out of Spuyten Duyvil on my way home,'' he said.

Part of the difference is in the water's character. Experienced boaters agreed that Hudson River waters tend to be more peaceful than the sound, which can be very temperamental.

''The Hudson is very calm, but the sound can go from nice to windy to really, really scary,'' said Steve Plotkin, manager of the Half Moon Bay Marina, which is unusually deep for the Hudson, about 8 1/2 feet at low tide. The marina has 173 slips, with a minimum starting price of $30,000.

Other mariners agreed that boating on the Hudson is more scenic. But there is a great deal of commercial traffic there, including tugboats and huge tourist boats that can create large, dangerous wakes. The sound features hidden nooks and crannies, restaurants and serious fishing.

Then, there's the thorny, and truly unresolvable, issue of which side is truly better.

''We don't have train tracks like they have over there that separate them from the water,'' said Bernard Rosenshein, president of the Mamaroneck Beach and Yacht Club. The Metro-North commuter line tracks run right up the riverbed on the Hudson line, making long stretches of shoreline difficult to reach for the Hudson River water clubs. (The flat riverbed made railroad construction relatively easy, and the Hudson River Railroad reached Peekskill by 1849, eventually driving the steamship companies out of business, according to the Westchester County Historical Society.)

The boats on each side tend to be different, too. The water at many marinas on the Hudson is quite shallow at low tide, and is silting in at the rate of seven inches a year, which means the clubs can't accommodate large boats with a deep draft, said John H. Vargo, publisher of a monthly magazine, ''Boating on the Hudson and Beyond.''

''Big sailboats have difficulty in most marinas on the Hudson River, and the silting is a serious problem,'' Mr. Vargo said.

Dredging marinas on the Hudson River is costly, since the silt must first be tested for toxicity, and then treated and removed, Mr. Vargo said, which is why most river marinas choose not to fight the battle of the silt.

It takes money to own any kind of boat, of course, but it takes bigger money to have a boat on the sound, many boaters said.

''The corridor on the sound from Larchmont to Greenwich is economically one of the highest in the country,'' Mr. Rosenshein said, adding that, ''I can't say the same for the Hudson side.'' His view of the difference between boats on the sound and on the Hudson, he said, is ''a question of whether you have a Ferrari or a Chevrolet.''

Clubs on the Hudson tend to be working clubs, in which members donate their time to maintain the property. Eugene Manzella, 82, who lives in Peekskill, keeps a 25-foot fishing boat at the Cortlandt Yacht Club, which has 170 boats on the Hudson River. ''We all chip in with work,'' Mr. Manzella said. He added that he spends nearly all day at the club during the summer, answering phones and handing out homemade coffee and store-bought cake.

The seven-acre club has no restaurant, no cocktail lounge, no snack bar. Membership is limited to 100 members who share ownership, and 50 associate members.

Yacht and boat clubs on the sound, for the most part, tend to be clubs in which members pay other people to do chores.

''The clubs are far more expensive on the sound,'' Mr. Vargo said. At the Mamaroneck Beach and Yacht Club, for example, ''our food is known throughout the area,'' Mr. Rosenshein said.

The Larchmont Yacht Club, which was built in 1880 and has 625 members with 316 boats, has three dining rooms, a bar, a grill, a snack bar, and an outdoor veranda.

These are the kind of clubs where a love of sailing, as well as club membership, are passed down from generation to generation. John Lyons, a 56-year-old banker and a member of the Larchmont Yacht Club who lives in Mamaroneck, has been a member since his father joined in 1951. His oldest daughter, 13, races her own 14-foot sailboat, as did Mr. Lyons when he was a teenager.

Several yacht club managers on the sound refused to discuss membership fees. One member of the Larchmont Yacht Club, who asked not to be identified, said that the initiation fee is $10,000, annual dues are $3,300, and there is a dining minimum of $120 a quarter, plus a mooring rental fee

A manager of the American Yacht Club in Rye, one of the most exclusive on the sound, refused to discuss the club with a reporter.

Fishing on the two waterways also differs. Both sides have commercial fishing, including lobsters and oysters on the Long Island Sound and shad on the Hudson River, but recreational fishing is bigger business, said Mark Tedesco, director of the Environmental Protection Agency for Long Island Sound. Anglers there fish for striped bass, bluefish, tautog, flounder and porgies, although there are advisories on how much of the fish is safe to eat for pregnant women, he said. On the Hudson, the catch is striped bass, and shad during a brief spring season; women of childbearing age are advised to limit the amount they eat.

Swimming differs, too. While there are more swimming beaches on Long Island Sound than on the Hudson River, both sides have pollution problems and occasional beach closings. Swimming on both sides became appealing only in the mid- to late 1980's, when effective sewage plants were built and industrial pollution was curtailed.

Now, however, the public beach at Playland Park in Rye, one of the busiest on the Long Island Sound side, attracts about 2,600 swimmers each weekend, according to Peter Tartaglia, the park's director of marketing.

From early spring to late fall, both river and sound are patrolled by police units, including Hudson River police departments in Yonkers and Peekskill, and the Long Island Sound police departments in New Rochelle, Mamaroneck, Rye City and Port Chester.

''People stop and ask me how they can get my job,'' said Andrew S. Landau, commanding officer of the village of Mamaroneck Police Marine Unit, who has been a water cop for 19 years, armed with a shotgun and a rifle, and the authority to enforce laws on any body of water in New York State.

''Any vessel with a motor has to be registered. If you have a log with a motor it has to be registered.'' He also enforces more obscure violations, such as ''possession of mutilated lobsters,'' creatures missing a claw, for instance, and a ban on ''water skiing between sunset and sunrise.''

On an overcast Sunday in August, Lieutenant Landau turned on the blue flashing lights of his 26-foot working boat with a 250-horsepower engine and pulled over a pale, blank-faced man smoking a cigar who said he did not know that a registration was supposed to be affixed to his inflatable boat. The lieutenant gave the man a warning.

Marine units are also responsible for most water rescues.

''It can be hellish on the water if you are not expecting a summer squall,'' said Sergeant Heine. He has sometimes tuned into the marine rescue channel and heard ''wails and screaming from people on boats who think the world is ending,'' he said.

One place you won't find water cops on their days off is on the water.

''When I'm off the boat, I'm off the boat,'' said Lieutenant Landau. He avoids water, he said, ''unless I'm swimming in it or playing over it on a golf course.''

The Water's Cleaner, but Still ...

At the Philipse Manor Beach Club, on the Hudson River, the head lifeguard, Arley Morton, 18, said he has found a skinned cat, a headless seal and syringes.

At the Manursing Island Club, on the Sound, an occasional dead deer, dead raccoon, or syringe washes up, said Alison Plati, longtime beach and pool director. Still, both bodies of water are cleaner now than they used to be.

''The Hudson River is in magnificent condition,'' said John H. Vargo, publisher of a magazine about boating on the Hudson. Decades ago, he said, ''I remember when you had to swim with one hand in front of you to push the debris away.''

In the late 1960's, ''the Hudson River was a virtual biological desert,'' agreed Cesare Manfredi, a retired engineer for the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation. Several decades ago, he said, there was a continuous oil sheen on the water, and a factory near Peekskilldumped molasses waste into the river that was so thick ''you couldn't get a boat into the water.''

During the 1900's, Hudson pollutants included waste from the General Motors plant in Sleepy Hollow, the Anaconda Wire and Cable Company in Hastings, Standard Brands in Peekskill and General Electric in Fort Edward. Between 1947 and 1977, the General Electric plant leaked 1.3 million pounds of toxic PCBs into the river, and was ordered by the Environmental Protection Agency to clean up 40 remaining hot spots by the end of 2012, according to Manna Jo Greene of the Hudson River Sloop in Poughkeepsie, a group working to improve water quality.

In the 1960's, several rivers flowing into the Sound ''were literally open sewers,'' said Mr. Manfredi. The four Sound-side sewage treatment plants in Westchester County dumped barely treated sewage into the water. The water has improved, he added, although Mamaroneck still has sewage spills.

Until the blackout on Aug. 14, only seven beaches, all on the sound, had been closed this summer, including Harbor Island, Shore Acres, Beachpoint, Mamaroneck Beach and Cabana, Orienta, Echo Bay and Hudson Park, according to the Westchester County Department of Health. After the blackout, the county closed all 56 county beaches as a precaution, including all those on the Long Island Sound, the Hudson River, and on inland lakes, according to Gabe Sganga, beach program director for the Bureau of Public Health. By Sunday, Aug. 17, all county beaches had been reopened, he said. CARIN RUBENSTEIN

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new york yacht club annual dues

Stepping inside the super-exclusive New York Yacht Club where the America's Cup race started - complete with a 25ft tall fireplace, an original Tiffany glass ceiling and $150,000 joining fee

  • The New York Yacht Club at 37 W 44th St formally opened its doors on January 19, 1901
  • It was designed Whitney Warren of Warren and Wetmore, who later masterminded Grand Central Terminal
  • Standout features include a dining room designed to look like a ship's hold and a library with 13,000 books 

By Sadie Whitelocks For Dailymail.com

Published: 12:33 EDT, 24 November 2023 | Updated: 13:02 EDT, 24 November 2023

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Standing 25ft high and 15ft wide, the 25-ton stone fireplace at the super-exclusive New York Yacht Club is certainly a sight to behold and I felt dwarfed by the structure as I stood close to the flame-licked hearth.

This design marvel was just one of the many jaw-dropping features I spied during a private tour of the Midtown members-only club, which formally opened its doors on January 19, 1901.   

Tucked away from the throng of Times Square on 37 W 44th St, the six-story Beaux-Arts clubhouse was purpose built by yachtsman and banker John Pierpont Morgan to accommodate the organization's burgeoning fleet of members. 

Thanks to regular maintenance, the building looks shipshape, with some of the standout features - along with the 'Model Room' fireplace - being a stunning Tiffany stained-glass ceiling, a 64ft by 19-ft Oriental rug, a grill room designed to look like the hold of an old sailing ship, and a library containing more than 13,000 books and antique manuscripts.

Standing 25ft high and 15ft wide, the 25-ton stone fireplace at the super exclusive New York Yacht Club is certainly a sight to behold. Above it, there is a magnificent stained-glass Tiffany ceiling

Standing 25ft high and 15ft wide, the 25-ton stone fireplace at the super exclusive New York Yacht Club is certainly a sight to behold. Above it, there is a magnificent stained-glass Tiffany ceiling

Tucked away from the throng of Times Square on 37 W 44th St, the six-story Beaux-Arts clubhouse was purpose built by yachtsman and banker John Pierpont Morgan to accommodate the organization's fleet of members

Tucked away from the throng of Times Square on 37 W 44th St, the six-story Beaux-Arts clubhouse was purpose built by yachtsman and banker John Pierpont Morgan to accommodate the organization's fleet of members

Before the 44th St clubhouse was built, the New York Yacht Club had a number of outposts in the wider area. The first clubhouse opened one year after the club was founded on July 15, 1845

Before the 44th St clubhouse was built, the New York Yacht Club had a number of outposts in the wider area. The first clubhouse opened one year after the club was founded on July 15, 1845

Thanks to its eye-catching and unique ship-like design, the exterior of the 44th St building was designated as a landmark by the City of New York Landmarks Preservation Commission on September 11, 1979

Thanks to its eye-catching and unique ship-like design, the exterior of the 44th St building was designated as a landmark by the City of New York Landmarks Preservation Commission on September 11, 1979

It was a Wednesday night and the downstairs bar area was buzzing with members - mostly men in smart suits - with an oyster shucker dishing out rounds of fresh mollusks and a suited waiter taking drink orders. 

In keeping with the maritime theme, every way I turned, I caught sight of something sailing related, with model boats lining the walls and paintings depicting wave swept scenes.

As I put my glass down on the table, I noticed that even the paper napkins featured a design with boats and an anchor on, along with the club's motto Latin motto 'nos agimur tumidis velis' - 'we go with swelling sails.'

Other sailing motifs, I noticed, are part of the building's brick and mortar design.

For example, three bulbous bay windows at the front of the building were modeled after the sterns of 16th century Dutch ships and there are various carvings on the premises running from the cornicing to the fireplace surround depicting seaweed, shells, dolphins, lightning bolts, stars and more.

The characterful property was designed Whitney Warren of Warren and Wetmore, who later masterminded Grand Central Terminal. 

In a video tour of the clubhouse uploaded to YouTube , narrator and pro sailor Gary Jobson explains that while there were several architects in the running for the project, John Pierpont Morgan preferred Warren's 'much more whimsical design.'

To help finance the construction of the city clubhouse, members dues were raised from $25 per year to $50. 

Today, according to  ncesc.com , regular membership is a little pricier, with an initiation fee of $150,000 and annual dues of $12,000.

Along with having a buoyant bank balance, perspective members must be nominated by an existing member, with this nomination supported by at least four other members.

The membership committee will then invite the nominee to submit an application along with letters of recommendation outlining their qualifications. 

In terms of the benefits of becoming a member, ncesc.com explains that the perks include 'access to the club's facilities, which include dining rooms, bars, meeting rooms, and sailing centers.'

'Members also have access to the club's extensive library, archives, and art collection. In addition, the club organizes numerous social events throughout the year, including regattas, dinners, and receptions.'

In Jobson's video tour, he also reveals that there are 19 'comfortable bedrooms for members and their guests,' which can be booked out at a discounted rate. 

Before visiting the club, we were warned that business attire must be worn, with a tie, jacket and collared shirt for men, and a suit or a smart dress for women. 

The paper napkins in the dining room feature a design with boats and an anchor on, along with the club's motto Latin motto 'nos agimur tumidis velis' - 'we go with swelling sails'

The paper napkins in the dining room feature a design with boats and an anchor on, along with the club's motto Latin motto 'nos agimur tumidis velis' - 'we go with swelling sails'

An exterior shot of the characterful clubhouse taken in 1934. It looks much the same today

An exterior shot of the characterful clubhouse taken in 1934. It looks much the same today

The library within the Manhattan clubhouse contains more than 13,000 books and antique manuscripts

The library within the Manhattan clubhouse contains more than 13,000 books and antique manuscripts

One of the club's unique features is a grill room, designed to look like the hold of an old sailing ship

One of the club's unique features is a grill room, designed to look like the hold of an old sailing ship

Certainly one of the club's standout spaces is the cavernous Model Room, which can comfortably accommodate more than 300 people with 3,800 square feet to play with

Certainly one of the club's standout spaces is the cavernous Model Room, which can comfortably accommodate more than 300 people with 3,800 square feet to play with

The space is home to 1,340 scaled replicas of sail boats, with the earliest model dating to 1819

The space is home to 1,340 scaled replicas of sail boats, with the earliest model dating to 1819

If you can't stretch to club membership or don't have the right qualifications to join, the New York Yacht Club runs public tours on the last Tuesday of each month

If you can't stretch to club membership or don't have the right qualifications to join, the New York Yacht Club runs public tours on the last Tuesday of each month

Certainly one of the club's standout spaces is the cavernous Model Room, which can comfortably accommodate more than 300 people with 3,800 square feet to play with. 

Along with the fireplace, the space is home to 1,340 scaled replicas of sail boats displayed in large glass cases, with the earliest model dating to 1819.

One of the star vessels is a mini version of the 'America,' which was responsible for the start of the America's Cup. 

On August 22, 1851, the full-size 101-foot schooner, built by New York Yacht Club commodore and founder John Cox Stevens, raced against 15 English yachts from the UK's Royal Yacht Squadron in an annual race known as the '100 Guinea Cup,' which involved a lap of the Isle of Wight. 

The visiting America won, finishing eight minutes ahead of its closest rival, and the trophy was renamed in its honor and donated to the New York Yacht Club.

An accompanying 'Deed of Gift' stipulated that the cup should be held in trust as a perpetual challenge trophy and so the America's Cup race was born. 

Today it takes place every four years as a two-yacht race, fought between the previous year's winner - known as the 'defender' - and a challenger, which is usually the best boat from a series of run-off rounds. 

Before the 44th St clubhouse was built, the New York Yacht Club had a number of outposts in the wider area.

The first clubhouse opened one year after the club was founded on July 15, 1845.

The club's website notes that this location was was a one-room Gothic Revival building designed by 'noted' architect A. J. Davis, on land owned by Commodore John Cox Stevens in Hoboken, New Jersey.

Over the next half century, the club went on to occupy four additional clubhouses: two in Manhattan and two on Staten Island and it also maintained 11 'stations' at one point.

These 'stations' came in the form of smaller buildings and landings where 'members and friends could rendezvous, send a letter or make a telephone call.'

Now, along with the 44 St property, the club only has one other outpost, with this located next the water in Newport, Rhode Island. 

Thanks to its eye-catching and unique ship-like design, the exterior of the 44th St building was designated as a landmark by the City of New York Landmarks Preservation Commission on September 11, 1979.

If you can't stretch to club membership or don't have the right qualifications to join, the New York Yacht Club runs public tours on the last Tuesday of each month. And after paying a visit myself, it's a voyage well worth making. 

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new york yacht club annual dues

Manhattan Yacht Club is the largest community of sailors in New York Harbor.  Sailors like to meet and hang out together.  We organize many events through the year.  During our sailing season from May through October, most of the events occur at our club docks.  During the off-season from November through April events occur at various locations.

January Ring of Fire Gathering De Caribbean Regatta

February Blue Water Society Dinner

March Outboard Engine Seminar Racing & Race Committee Spring Meet-Up

April Spring Launching Annual Sailors Ball Fundraiser

May Commissioning Ceremony Spring Racing Series Begin

June Junior Sailing Programs Begin

July Summer Racing Series Begins

August The Annual Cruise on Arabella Shorthanded Championship Women’s Championship Fall Racing Series Begin

September Pirate Sail

October John LaGrassa Memorial Regatta Decommissioning of the Fleet Caribbean Pump-Up Party November Winter Seminar Series

December Annual Dinner

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Join the Club

Membership benefits.

  • Go sailing on your own or with friends during supervised sailing
  • Free Sailing & Windsurfing Lessons
  • Dinghy, catamaran, and daysailer checkout (no additional reservation fees)
  • Social events
  • Snooze & Cruise
  • Keelboat checkout (appropriate ratings required)
  • Member discount at Fisheries Supply in Wallingford

new york yacht club annual dues

WYC Memberships can either be paid on a quarterly or yearly basis. Membership dues go to maintaining WYC’s boat fleet as well as buying fuel and supplies for social events (such as Snooze and Cruise).

Initiation Fee

Quarterly dues, annual dues, faculty/staff/alumni, wyc membership form.

Sign up for an annual or quarterly membership with the Washington Yacht Club. WYC memberships are $39 per quarter or $100 annually for students and $80 per quarter or $225 annually for non-students.

UW Recreation Department is requiring that all WYC members hold an IMA membership (now known as Rec membership) in addition to a WYC membership in order to access facilities/docks at the Waterfront Activities Center. The IMA membership is typically included in a UW Seattle student's tuition. For summer quarter, unless taking classes, UW students will need to purchase a IMA membership.

Check if you have an Rec/IMA membership here.

For UW Employees and UW Retirees, you are eligible to purchase IMA memberships for $120 per quarter or $390 per year. For others, you can be paired with an IMA membership holder to receive a Plus One IMA membership for $96 per quarter if paired with a student or $126 per quarter if paired with an employee.

For more information about IMA memberships visit Rec Membership | Recreation (washington.edu) . WYC memberships follow Rec/IMA membership expiration dates

  • Spring 2024
  • Spring 2024, Summer 2024, Fall 2024, Winter 2025
  • Student, but graduating, taking quarter off, etc.
  • Employee/Retiree
  • Summer 2024
  • Winter 2025
  • I am already sponsoring a WYC member and can coordinate renewal with them on my own
  • No, I am already sponsored and can coordinate renewal with them on my own
  • No, I will not use the facilities/docks at the Waterfront Activities Center
  • Current member looking to renew
  • Previous member looking to rejoin

New Member Information

Washington yacht club.

Participant’s ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF RISK, WAIVER AND RELEASE OF LIABILITY, and CONSENT TO TREATMENT

This is a BINDING CONTRACT that modifies your legal rights — READ CAREFULLY BEFORE SIGNING.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF RISK

I have chosen to accept  Membership in Washington Yacht Club (“WYC”) . I hereby acknowledge that SAILING IS A HIGH-RISK RECREATIONAL ACTIVITY ; that sailing, boating, other waterfront activities, volunteer work, instruction, vessel maintenance, use of University of Washington property and all other WYC related activities and locations where I may choose to participate as a member (“Activities”) involve the possibility of both MINOR AND SEVERE PHYSICAL INJURY, including PARALYSIS AND DEATH , among other inherent risks, dangers and hazards (“Risks”); such Risks are a common, ordinary and foreseeable part of the Activities which I may choose to participate in as a member; and BY CHOOSING TO PARTICIPATE, I KNOWINGLY AND VOLUNTARILY ASSUME THESE RISKS .

I agree that as a member of WYC MY PARTICIPATION IS VOLUNTARY AND AT MY OWN RISK ; with full understanding and appreciation of the Risks involved, I agree that I AM SOLELY RESPONSIBLE FOR MY OWN SAFETY AND FOR ALL DAMAGES arising from my participation as a club member, in club related activities, or using club vessels, facilities or equipment; I understand and accept that I MAY SUFFER TEMPORARY, PERMANENT OR EVEN FATAL INJURIES, even if I follow all advice and instructions given by WYC directors, chiefs, officers, instructors, employees, volunteers or other agents (“the Club”) ; that training, coaching, instruction, supervision, and enforcement of club rules by the Club does not and cannot guarantee my personal safety; that I may freely choose not to participate in any activity which I subjectively believe to be unsafe; and that BY CHOOSING TO PARTICIPATE I KNOWINGLY AND VOLUNTARILY ASSUME ALL RISKS .

I represent that | am physically fit and capable of performing all club Activities I choose to participate in. I know of no medical or health reason why I should not participate in any club Activities as a WYC member. I agree that I will personally and subjectively evaluate each club Activity before participating to determine whether it is safe and suitable for me. If at any time I feel I cannot or should not participate, or continue my participation, I will discontinue my participation immediately. I will immediately notify WYC of any health problem or medical condition that could affect my ability to participate safely in any Activities .

WAIVER AND RELEASE OF LIABILITY

In partial consideration for WYC acceptance of my application for membership, and in exchange for participation in the Activities provided by the club, and the use of club facilities or equipment, I agree to the following provisions:

  • I unconditionally WAIVE AND RELEASE ALL CLAIMS, AND AGREE TO HOLD HARMLESS, DEFEND AND INDEMNIFY WYC AND THE UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, ITS OFFICERS, AGENTS AND EMPLOYEES (“UW”) FROM ANY CLAIM, COSTS, DAMAGES OR OTHER LIABILITY for injury, damages or losses arising from my participation in any club Activities, INCLUDING THOSE RESULTING FROM NEGLIGENCE , against UW, WYC, its directors, officers, employees, volunteers, members and/or agent in the course and within the scope of their WYC-imposed duties;
  • I hereby unconditionally RELIEVE WYC AND UW OF ALL DUTY TO PROTECT ME FROM HARM in connection with any Activities in which I participate;
  • I agree that at all times I will abide by all applicable WYC, University of Washington, Local, State and Federal laws, rules and regulations governing my actions while a participant in club Activities ; if I should choose not to comply with any such laws, rules or regulation I ACCEPT FULL RESPONSIBILITY FOR ALL DAMAGES OR OTHER CONSEQUENCES arising from my non-compliance, and I AGREE TO HOLD HARMLESS, DEFEND AND INDEMNIFY WYC AND UW from any claim, legal action, or enforcement that may arise from my non-compliance;
  • I agree that this CONTRACT shall be construed in accordance with, and governed by, the laws of the State of Washington, without reference to principles governing choice or conflicts of laws; I agree that any lawsuit against WYC and/or UW must be filed and maintained in state courts sitting in King County, Washington State, or in federal courts sitting in the Western District of Washington State; and I consent and agree that jurisdiction and venue for such proceedings shall lie exclusively with such courts. If any portion of this CONTRACT is held to be void or unenforceable, I agree that the remaining terms shall remain in full force and effect.

CONSENT TO TREATMENT

Should I require emergency medical treatment as a result of accident or illness arising during my participation in club Activities , I consent to such treatment. I acknowledge that WYC as a volunteer-run public charity with limited resources does not provide health or accidence insurance for members or participants during sailing or other club Activities and I agree to be financially responsible for any medical bills incurred as a result of emergency medical treatment provided. I will notify WYC in writing if I have or I develop a medical condition or health problem about which emergency medical personnel should be informed.

I HAVE READ AND UNDERSTAND THE ABOVE ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF RISK, RELEASE AND WAIVER OF LIABILITY , AND CONSENT TO TREATMENT ;

I ACKNOWLEDGE THAT THIS IS A LEGALLY BINDING RELEASE AND INDEMNITY AGREEMENT THAT MODIFIES MY LEGAL RIGHTS;

BY MY SIGNATURE BELOW I FREELY AND KNOWINGLY AGREE TO THESE TERMS :

Once we find a student to pair you with for a Plus One membership, we will send you an email with instructions.

IMAGES

  1. Photos: Inside the Exclusive New York Yacht Club in NYC

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  2. New York Yacht Club Invitational Cup 2021

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  3. 167 th New York Yacht Club Annual Regatta

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  4. Photos: Inside the Exclusive New York Yacht Club in NYC

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  5. Record-breaking Turnout for 160th Edition of the New York Yacht Club

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  6. Top 12 Best Yacht Clubs Near Me in the World

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COMMENTS

  1. How Much Does a New York Yacht Club Membership Cost?

    The New York Yacht Club, said to be the best club in the world by sailors, is located in New York City and New Port, Rhode Island. It was founded in 1844 by a group of yachtsmen at the time. The club was established in 1844, making it one of the oldest clubs in New York.

  2. How Much Does New York Yacht Club Membership Cost?

    For instance, the Regular Membership is the most expensive one, with annual dues of $12,000 and an initiation fee of $26,000. The Intermediate Membership is only available for those who are between 21 and 39 years old and has annual costs of $6,000 and an initiation fee of $7,500. The Junior Membership is available only if you are under 21 ...

  3. Home

    170th Annual Regatta+ 52 Super Series 2024 Women's Championship 2024 Bermuda Short-Handed Return 2024 TP52 World Championship ... That afternoon, they established the New York Yacht Club (NYYC) and made three critical decisions that day: first, they elected Stevens as Commodore of the Club; second, they agreed to develop rules and regulations ...

  4. About Us

    The New York Yacht Club held its first Annual Regatta--a fleet race for a prize cup--on July 17, 1845. Nine yachts started opposite the new clubhouse at 9 a.m. on the Hudson River. They sailed to a turning mark near Sandy Hook in the Lower Bay and returned—a 38-mile course. The yacht Cygnet won, earning fame as the first winner of North ...

  5. How Much Does a New York Yacht Club Membership Cost?

    The New York Yacht Club offers several types of membership, including regular, intermediate, junior, and honorary. Regular membership is the most expensive, with an initiation fee of $150,000 and annual dues of $12,000. Intermediate membership has a lower initiation fee of $7,500 and annual dues of $6,000, but is only available to those between ...

  6. Membership Information

    Annual Events; Reciprocal Yacht Clubs; Burgee & Flag Etiquette; Learn to Sail; ... Manhattan Yacht Club is the largest and most active sailing organization in New York Harbor. Our Club embodies the spirit of openness and inclusivity. ... you pay normal dues. If you join in June, you pay 5/6 the annual dues. In July, you pay 4/6, August is 3/6 ...

  7. New York Yacht Club

    The New York Yacht Club (NYYC) is a private social club and yacht club based in New York City and Newport, Rhode ... if the NYYC raised its annual membership dues from $25 to $50 and if the new clubhouse occupied the entire site. The board accepted his offer, and Morgan bought the lots the next day for $148,000 and donated to the club. ...

  8. Membership : Lake Norman Yacht Club

    Membership Types. There are two types of membership, Associate and Resident, available to New Members. Associate members can enjoy full use of the property, including the pavilion, clubhouse, swimming area, and launch ramps. The biggest difference is that Associate members are not permitted to keep boats on the property.

  9. The Top 50 Most Exclusive Yacht Clubs In The World Honored ...

    Located in Westchester County, New York, the Club has been in existence since 1880 when it was purchased by Benjamin A. Carver, a railroad magnate. ... and annual dues at $5,500. Royal Palm Yacht ...

  10. How Much Do Yacht Club Memberships Cost? (5 Helpful Examples)

    To give you an idea of what you could expect to pay for your yacht club membership, here are some numbers gathered from across the country: Yacht Club. Annual Dues. Charleston Yacht Club. $900. Florida Yacht Club. $3,288. Atlanta Yacht Club. $900.

  11. Membership Info

    You can also contact us at any time by emailing [email protected] or by calling (516) 671-7374. All prospective members must be sponsored by two current members of the Club who are in good standing. Once a prospective member has decided to join the Club, he or she will be sent an application for membership.

  12. A Tale of Two Shorelines

    One member of the Larchmont Yacht Club, who asked not to be identified, said that the initiation fee is $10,000, annual dues are $3,300, and there is a dining minimum of $120 a quarter, plus a ...

  13. Yachting

    170th Annual Regatta+ 52 Super Series 2024 Women's Championship 2024 Bermuda Short-Handed Return 2024 TP52 World Championship ... The New York Yacht Club presents a range of sailing events for both fleet and team racing and biannual favorites like Race Week at Newport presented by Rolex and the Rolex New York Yacht Club Invitational Cup. In ...

  14. Stepping inside the super-exclusive New York Yacht Club where the

    The New York Yacht Club at 37 W 44th St formally opened its doors on January 19, 1901; ... with an initiation fee of $150,000 and annual dues of $12,000.

  15. 169th Annual Regatta

    The New York Yacht Club Annual Regatta was first run on July 17, 1845, on the Hudson River. Nine yachts started the 40-mile race with the 45-ton Cygnet winning with an elapsed time of 5 hour and 26 minutes. The race was run in or near New York City until 1988 when the purchase of Harbour Court in Newport, R.I., gave the Club a waterfront ...

  16. Annual Events

    Pay Dues; Employment; Annual Events. Manhattan Yacht Club is the largest community of sailors in New York Harbor. Sailors like to meet and hang out together. We organize many events through the year. During our sailing season from May through October, most of the events occur at our club docks.

  17. PDF Newport Yacht Club

    Newport Yacht Club History Newport Yacht Club was organized in 1936. Its charter as a membership corporation under New York State law states its purpose: "To promote the sport of small sailboat racing and sailing." The Club was first located on Newport Island, just across the Massuag Cove from the present site.

  18. PDF NEW YORK YACHT CLUB 170th NYYC ANNUAL REGATTA

    The host is the New York Yacht Club (NYYC). GENERAL FORMAT The 170th NYYC Annual Regatta will consist of: The Around-the-Island Race (ATI) or middle-distance race (scored separately) on Friday, June 14. Shields ... Annual dues and any certificate filing fees must have been paid. Depending on the number of entries, the 12 Metres may start as a ...

  19. Join

    WYC Membership Form. Sign up for an annual or quarterly membership with the Washington Yacht Club. WYC memberships are $39 per quarter or $100 annually for students and $80 per quarter or $225 annually for non-students. UW Recreation Department is requiring that all WYC members hold an IMA membership (now known as Rec membership) in addition to ...

  20. House Rules

    New York Yacht Club. This easy to read to brochure simplifies the annual yearbook bylaws and house rules so that all members and their guests feel welcome and comfortable ... 37 West 44th Street, New York, NY 10036 212-201-4332 5 Halidon Avenue, Newport, RI 02840 401-846-1000

  21. Home

    History of American Yacht Club. Much has changed in the 140 years since "robber baron" Jay Gould and a group of his friends founded the American Yacht Club in New York City. By 1887, clearly in need of a shore station, the club purchased "12 acres and some rocks known as Scotch Caps" from the Wainwright family at the tip of Milton Point in Rye, NY.

  22. Membership

    Imagine enjoying the benefits of one of the most beautiful Yacht Clubs in the Finger Lakes. An impressive clubhouse, immaculate bath house and variety of docks for sale or lease. ... Annual Fees - (2020) Dues - $395 Dock fee (based on length of dock) $30.56/ft. ... 300 South Clute Park Road, Watkins Glen, New York 14891, United States (607 ...

  23. 170th Annual Regatta+ 52 Super Series

    The New York Yacht Club Annual Regatta was first run on July 17, 1845, on the Hudson River. Nine yachts started the 40-mile race with the 45-ton Cygnet winning with an elapsed time of 5 hour and 26 minutes. The race was run in or near New York City until 1988 when the purchase of Harbour Court in Newport, R.I., gave the Club a waterfront ...