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It's Time to Navigate   Grief  with Confidence

Experience-Based Grief Coaching with Tim Bigonia

More Value Through Experience-Based Grief Coaching Online

What to expect and how to prepare.

Walk Your Path with Confidence

Walking through grief takes a toll on what we believe we can do and who we know we are. Through weekly challenges you will come to reclaim your confidence and build your inner strength to better approach your new normal.

Experience is Knowledge

Sharing experiences with our grief journey goes a long way in understanding the grief process. Through my story's rich history with loss, I will provide guideposts along your path to help you anticipate what may come your way.

How to Allow Yourself Grace

In simple words, we need to learn how be good to ourself. An impactful side effect of loss is guilt, which all too often becomes our focus following loss and months beyond. Through this coaching opportunity we all will find the benefits of grace going forward.

Importance of Self-Care Today

As time moves forward, caring for ourself in grief will become more important than ever. Through group discussions and personal messages we all will learn thet self-care is not only suggested, but it is a necessary ingredient to take a step forward.

Discover a Way Forward that Fits You

The idea of moving forward is one of great stress. In all honestly, life moves forward whether we want it to or not. Our goal here is to find a way forward that works for us, that fits us, while never leaving anything or any feeling behind.

Why Grief Coaching?

Grief is misunderstood. That's a fact. But we don't have to accept that because we, as humans, can do better. I believe the more we share our experiences with grief and support, the better we all can become.

We need to examine common myths of grief; for instance, the idea that grief has a timeline you must follow is absurd. We should confront the struggles with our inner-self when we find ourselves alone and when our worst enemy becomes ourselves. Moreover, we must discover how to walk this path with grief in a manner that lifts us to reveal our strengths and the possibilities of life again.

Join me as we navigate your journey through personal experience-based grief coaching designed to help you focus on healthy ways to walk your path with grief. Together we will discover a way forward that fits you with a fresh perspective today while building an inspiring tomorrow.

Holding Hands

Podcast Host, Speaker, Widower, Father

Hi, I'm Tim, the creator, and host of the Journey to Grateful podcast, launched on April 4, 2021, to help others better navigate their grief journey. I realized after the passing of my wife, Colleen, in July of 2020 that there was a poor understanding of grief in society as a whole. Expectations that grief has a timeline and a perceived deadline for its duration are only two of many misconceptions tied to grief and grieving.

The mission of the Journey to Grateful podcast and this experience-based grief coaching is clear. Demystify grief and create a world where grief can be freely discussed and better understood. I will help people navigate their loss and bolster their confidence in moving even one step forward through grief.

Learn More »

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"How lucky I am to have something that makes saying goodbye so hard."

— Winnie the Pooh

“Learning from others who have dealt with grief before me truly helps me understand what to expect. The guidance has taught me more in one month than I've realized in four.”

“This is the toughest road I've had to travel, and with others who understand, it makes it much more bearable.”

“Bereavement groups have been helpful, but waiting a month - sometimes two - is tough. I'm so glad to be able to connect with others nearly anytime! My questions get answered when I need them to…”

It's Time to Find Help Differently.

It's time to view grief differently..

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Book Your First Month of Group Coaching Today

With  Journey Through Grief Coaching , you will become part of a select group of up to six people  looking for more than just a once-in-awhile bereavement group. In this month-to-month program, you will discover more about the grieving process through shared experiences, personal insights, and the grief resources I’ve found beneficial in helping me navigate my grief. 

The Journey Through Grief Coaching is hosted at Volley.app, an asynchronous messaging platform where we take turns sending video, audio, or written messages. It’s the richness of talking with the flexibility of texting. Its largest benefit is the ability to send a message when you have a thought or an issue. No waiting for next week's bereavement group; send it now. In most cases, you will receive a response within hours, most likely, sooner.

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Living with Grief and Loss

- Blaise Pascal

Welcome. I am the author of the book Seasons of Solace . Before I knew that I would have a book published, I began this website in an attempt to explore the healing journey through grief. I believe that healing comes as we make space in our lives to acknowledge and express our pain.

Several years ago my rosy view of life was shattered when my husband was killed by a drunk driver. I soon found that this one loss set in motion all kinds of other “lesser” losses, which I also had to learn to live with.

As much as we don't want it, loss affects all our lives at various points and in various ways. If you are feeling the need to talk to someone about your pain, read my Online Grief Counseling article.

Finding Healing

I offer this website to all who are on a healing journey through loss. Your loss may be traumatic and life-altering. Or you might feel your loss is small compared to some, yet your feelings are real and need to be honored.

On my journey, finding emotional healing has come through learning, writing, photography, and finding other creative ways to express my feelings. You may not see yourself as very creative - I didn't see myself that way either. But this isn't about becoming an accomplished artist, it is about becoming whole.

I invite you to explore some of what I have learned and how creative self-expression helped me to find healing. During my grief journey, I enrolled in a graduate program with a concentration in Trauma Healing. I also trained and became a spiritual director. These studies helped me process my pain and find new hope.

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Journeying Through Grief (4-Book Set)

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Journeying Through Grief (4-Book Set) Paperback – January 1, 2004

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Grief for beginners: 5 things to know about processing loss

Stephanie O'Neill

5 tips for how to deal with grief, from NPR's Life Kit.

We're all experiencing some form of grief these days. As this pandemic progresses, more of us will brush shoulders with loss.

The death of someone you care about deeply can be so gut wrenching and annihilating that you may be left unable to imagine ever regaining your equilibrium. And if you're there right now, just know you won't be in that painful place forever.

Explore Life Kit

This story comes from Life Kit , NPR's podcast with tools to help you get it together. To listen to this episode, play the audio at the top of the page or find it here .

I know, because that happened to me in early fall of 2017. That's when I lost my partner of three years in a motorcycle wreck.

His death flattened me. For two weeks, I couldn't eat. And for months after the accident, I barely slept, anxiety and exhaustion my constant companions. I came to believe that I'd never crawl out of the desolation.

But with proper care and attention, grief eases its heart-clenching grip. And, says grief expert Terri Daniel , embrace it fully and it can shake you alive and awake like nothing else.

"It's an opening to a new world, a new self, higher awareness, spiritual growth — whatever you allow to come in," says Daniel. "And it leads to greater peace in life."

Daniel knows this firsthand. In 2006, she lost her 16-year-old son to metachromatic leukodystrophy, a rare metabolic disorder.

"It was a progressively degenerative disease. He went from being a perfectly normal kid to in a wheelchair, unable to speak or manage his own body in any way," she says.

She offers these five strategies to help you cultivate a healthy relationship with grief.

1. Be with your grief.

Tending to grief requires us to be with it, in all its misery and messiness.

"We want to find a place where we can be present with it rather than be in resistance to it," Daniel says. "It's an old Buddhist teaching of sitting with uncertainty, sitting with discomfort. And that's the real tool we need for being with grief."

Coronavirus Has Upended Our World. It's OK To Grieve

Shots - Health News

Coronavirus has upended our world. it's ok to grieve.

It's not easy. But doing so is key to embarking on the "tasks of grieving," which span the entire grieving process.

Psychologist William Worden developed the concept, which involves four main tasks: acceptance of the loss, processing that loss, adjusting to life without the deceased person and finding ways to maintain an enduring connection with your loved one as you continue your life.

Daniel suggests thinking of the tasks of grieving as you do other recurring tasks in life. You face the discomfort and do the work because a healthy mourning process demands our presence.

The tasks differ from the "stages of grief" made famous by Elisabeth Kubler-Ross. She described the denial, anger, bargaining, depression and finally acceptance that a person goes through when facing their own death.

One thing is certain: Sidestepping grief isn't an option. Numbing the pain with work, alcohol or other drugs only delays the inevitable, says Sonya Lott , a Philadelphia-based psychologist.

"We have to move through it, or it will continue to show up in insidious ways in every aspect of our being: physically, cognitively, emotionally, spiritually," says Lott.

2. Grief is a lifelong journey.

The acute pain will subside, but the pain of loss never fully leaves us. It finds us at unexpected moments.

When you're in the throes of acute grief, this may sound untenable. But Daniel says, given time and space, grief matures into an old, comfortable friend.

It has been more than 13 years since Daniel lost her son. And when a wave of sadness hits her shore, she embraces it.

"I like to say, 'Hello, grief. ... I don't want you to be here, but I'm going to make friends with you because I can't get rid of you. So come on in and sit with me, and I will be your friend,' " Daniel says. "That's how you heal. That's how it strengthens you."

3. Grief needs expression.

Paint, sculpt, throw clay, dance, bake, journal — whatever feels right. And reach out to trusted friends or family members who get it.

"One of the things a grieving person needs more than anything else is to tell their story and be heard," she says.

Making art is good for your health. Here's how to start a habit

Making Art Is Good For Your Health. Here's How To Start A Habit

Many people benefit from support groups or time with a grief counselor.

If after a year, you still feel stuck, you could be moving into complicated grief . While regular grief doesn't usually require therapeutic intervention, that changes with complicated grief, says Lott.

She specializes in treating the condition, also known as prolonged grief disorder. Lott says it's diagnosed when a person experiences acute grief that interferes with their daily functioning more than a year after the death. A host of factors puts people at risk for complicated grief, Lott says. Among them are multiple losses within a short period, preexisting mental health conditions and unexpected deaths.

For that there's an evidence-based treatment called complicated grief therapy. You'll have to find someone like Lott who specializes in this , and it involves between 16 and 20 therapy sessions.

If you need help finding a therapist, there's a Life Kit for that too.

4. Healthy grieving involves pingponging between loss and restoration.

The journey through grief is not linear.

"So you're sad, you're crying, you can't get out of bed. You're angry. That's loss," Daniel says. "Then you get out of bed and you go write in your journal and take a walk in nature — that's restoration. Back and forth, back and forth. As long as you're moving between those two focuses all the time and you're not stagnant, you're gonna be fine."

Eventually, you'll find yourself residing mostly in restoration, which is healthy but also sometimes brings its own challenges.

"There's so much guilt that comes with that," she says. "We feel that holding on to our pain keeps us connected to our loved one, and it's not true."

Instead, Daniel and other grief experts urge you to find a positive way of remaining connected. Doing so is one of those important tasks of healing. For some, it's as simple as framing a favorite photo or planting a tree. For others, it's getting a tattoo. Or in the case of Daniel, adopting her son Danny's first name as her last.

5. Grief can break you open to a new you — if you let it.

In early grief, the change to your life is unwelcome. But grief is supposed to change you, Daniel says.

And for many of us, the healing period brings new passions and sometimes an entirely new direction in life. You may find yourself starting a charity, volunteering or going back to school.

How to deal with uncertainty — from people who have been there

Advice For Dealing With Uncertainty, From People Who've Been There

For me, it has been to better understand profound grief so that I can continue healing and, when possible, help others through it.

"The term that we use in counseling is 'meaning-making,' " Daniel says. "You make meaning out of your life."

We'd love to hear how you're coping during the coronavirus pandemic. Leave us a voicemail at 202-216-9823, or email us at [email protected] . Your tip could appear in an upcoming episode.

If you want more Life Kit, subscribe to our newsletter .

The audio portion of this story was produced by Meghan Keane.

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journey thru grief

Welcome to Journeys Through Grief

Journeys through Grief was created to accompany those of us who have suffered the loss of a loved one and are traveling through their own grief.

Grief is a slow and complicated process; we want to offer companionship , tools, and resources that will bring you a sense of support.

This is your journey. It is unique to you and to the relationship you have with the person who died. Your movement through your grief is at your own pace so let patience and a non-judgemental attitude be your friends. These will help you prevail.

You are invited to join with the community here, interacting with other grievers who can be a guide to you as well.

Thank you for allowing us to take this journey with you. We are stronger and better together.

Empowering your journey

Beyond the Broken Heart

A journey through grief.

Beyond the Broken Heart – A Journey Through Grief  is a dual-purpose resource. It is well-suited for  anyone  who has lost a loved one to death – a family member, child, friend, or spouse - who prefers to grieve alone or is unable to participate in a group. It is also the Participant Book for the grief group program. Each chapter includes:

  • Personal reflections from the author’s own journey through grief
  • Topics that offer spiritual and practical help for navigating the emotions, experiences, and challenges of grief
  • Scriptures and biblical references that support the themes and topics of each chapter
  • Questions for personal reflection

“Guides the brokenhearted on an honest journey toward acceptance and hope.”

– Stephen Bauman, Senior Minister, Christ Church United Methodist Church, New York City

The Journey Through Grief

The Mourner's Six "Reconciliation Needs"

by Alan D. Wolfelt, Ph.D.

The death of someone loved changes our lives forever. And the movement from the "before" to the "after" is almost always a long, painful journey. From my own experiences with loss as well as those of the thousands of grieving people I have worked with over the years, I have learned that if we are to heal we cannot skirt the outside edges of our grief. Instead, we must journey all through it, sometimes meandering the side roads, sometimes plowing directly into its raw center.

I have also learned that the journey requires mourning. There is an important difference, you see. Grief is what you think and feel on the inside after someone you love dies. Mourning is the outward expression of those thoughts and feelings. To mourn is to be an active participant in our grief journeys. We all grieve when someone we love dies, but if we are to heal, we must also mourn.

There are six "yield signs" you are likely to encounter on your journey through grief - what I call the "reconciliation needs of mourning." For while your grief journey will be an intensely personal, unique experience, all mourners must yield to this set of basic human needs if they are to heal.

Need 1. Acknowledging the reality of the death. This first need of mourning involves gently confronting the reality that someone you care about will never physically come back into your life again. Whether the death was sudden or anticipated, acknowledging the full reality of the loss may occur over weeks and months. To survive, you may try to push away the reality of the death at times. You may discover yourself replaying events surrounding the death and confronting memories, both good and bad. This replay is a vital part of this need of mourning. It's as if each time you talk it out, the event is a little more real. Remember - this first need of mourning, like the other five that follow, may intermittently require your attention for months. Be patient and compassionate with yourself as you work on each of them.

Need 2. Embracing the pain of the loss. This need of mourning requires us to embrace the pain of our loss - something we naturally don't want to do. It is easier to avoid, repress or deny the pain of grief than it is to confront it, yet it is in confronting our pain that we learn to reconcile ourselves to it.

You will probably discover that you need to "dose" yourself in embracing your pain. In other words, you cannot (nor should you try to) overload yourself with the hurt all at one time. Sometimes you may need to distract yourself from the pain of death, while at other times you will need to create a safe place to move toward it. Unfortunately, our culture tends to encourage the denial of pain. If you openly express your feelings of grief, misinformed friends may advise you to "carry on" or "keep your chin up." If, on the other hand, you remain "strong" and "in control," you may be congratulated for "doing well" with your grief. Actually, doing well with your grief means becoming well acquainted with your pain.

Need 3. Remembering the person who died. Do you have any kind of relationship with someone when they die? Of course. You have a relationship of memory. Precious memories, dreams reflecting the significance of the relationship and objects that link you to the person who died (such as photos, souvenirs etc.) are examples of some of the things that give testimony to a different form of a continued relationship. This need of mourning involves allowing and encouraging yourself to pursue this relationship. But some people may try to take your memories away. Trying to be helpful, they encourage you to take down all the photos of the person who died. They tell you to keep busy or even to move out of your house. But in my experience, remembering the past makes hoping for the future possible. Your future will become open to new experiences only to the extent that you embrace the past.

Need 4. Developing a new self-identity. Part of your self-identity comes from the relationships you have with other people. When someone with whom you have a relationship dies, your self-identity, or the way you see yourself, naturally changes. You may have gone from being a "wife" or "husband" to a "widow" or "widower." You may have gone from being a "parent" to a "bereaved parent." The way you define yourself and the way society defines you is changed. A death often requires you to take on new roles that had been filled by the person who died. After all, someone still has to take out the garbage, someone still has to buy the groceries. You confront your changed identity every time you do something that used to be done by the person who died. This can be very hard work and can leave you feeling very drained. You may occasionally feel child-like as you struggle with your changing identity. You may feel a temporarily heightened dependence on others as well as feelings of helplessness, frustration, inadequacy and fear.

Many people discover that as they work on this need, they ultimately discover some positive aspects of their changed self-identity. You may develop a renewed confidence in yourself, for example. You may develop a more caring, kind and sensitive part of yourself. You may develop an assertive part of your identity that empowers you to go on living even though you continue to feel a sense of loss.

Need 5. Searching for meaning. When someone you love dies, you naturally question the meaning and purpose of life. You probably will question your philosophy of life and explore religious and spiritual values as you work on this need. You may discover yourself searching for meaning in your continued living as you ask "How?" and "Why" questions. "How could God let this happen?" "Why did this happen now, in this way?" The death reminds you of your lack of control. It can leave you feeling powerless. The person who died was a part of you. This death means you mourn a loss not only outside of yourself, but inside of yourself as well. At times, overwhelming sadness and loneliness may be your constant companions. You may feel that when this person died, part of you died with him or her. And now you are faced with finding some meaning in going on with your life even though you may often feel so empty. This death also calls for you to confront your own spirituality. You may doubt your faith and have spiritual conflicts and questions racing through your head and heart. This is normal and part of your journey toward renewed living.

Need 6. Receiving ongoing support from others. The quality and quantity of understanding support you get during your grief journey will have a major influence on your capacity to heal. You cannot - nor should you try to - do this alone. Drawing on the experiences and encouragement of friends, fellow mourners or professional counselors is not a weakness but a healthy human need. And because mourning is a process that takes place over time, this support must be available months and even years after the death of someone in your life. Unfortunately, because our society places so much value on the ability to "carry on," "keep your chin up" and "keep busy," many mourners are abandoned shortly after the event of the death. "It's over and done with" and "It's time to get on with your life" are the types of messages directed at mourners that still dominate. Obviously, these messages encourage you to deny or repress your grief rather than express it. To be truly helpful, the people in your support system must appreciate the impact this death has had on you. They must understand that in order to heal, you must be allowed - even encouraged - to mourn long after the death. And they must encourage you to see mourning not as an enemy to be vanquished but as a necessity to be experienced as a result of having loved.

Reconciling your grief You may have heard - indeed you may believe - that your grief journey's end will come when you resolve, or recover from, your grief. But your journey will never end. People do not "get over" grief. Reconciliation is a term I find more appropriate for what occurs as the mourner works to integrate the new reality of moving forward in life without the physical presence of the person who died. With reconciliation comes a renewed sense of energy and confidence, an ability to fully acknowledge the reality of the death and a capacity to become reinvolved in the activities of living. In reconciliation, the sharp, ever-present pain of grief gives rise to a renewed sense of meaning and purpose. Your feeling of loss will not completely disappear, yet they will soften, and the intense pangs of grief will become less frequent. Hope for a continued life will emerge as you are able to make commitments to the future, realizing that the person who died will never be forgotten, yet knowing that your life can and will move forward.

Related Resources The Journey Through Grief: Reflections on Healing (book) Copyright 2007-2013, Center for Loss and Life Transition

She lost 100-pounds but gained it back. The grief surprised her. Now, like others, she's sharing her story.

journey thru grief

Grief  affects us all – but not in ways we always expect. People die, yes, but so do pets . We can grieve dreams, jobs, our health, past versions of ourselves.  Grief is not linear ; it does not come in stages, a common misconception. It's unique to the individual.

As we wrote a series of stories to shine a light on different grief journeys , we asked for your input. What kinds of grief had you experienced? Would you be willing to share your story publicly?

We got hundreds of responses − 300 and counting. Here's a look at what some of you shared. You can submit your own story here.

Darlene Mahon, 63

"After having lost and gained 100 pounds twice in my life, I have once again regained the weight. This is even after having reconstructive surgery to remove excess skin. The shame and loss surrounding this and the grief associated with the aging process make it difficult to move forward in so many ways.

I am no stranger to grief and have endured many losses as we all do as we age. What make my story so relative is that the loss of control over your own body is deeply personal. Sometimes the shame that comes with that loss keeps people from processing their grief and moving forward."

Shanan Ballam, 48

"I survived a massive stroke in January 2022. I have been grieving the loss of my identity as an active skier and hiker. I struggle to walk now. I initially had aphasia – which means I couldn’t speak. I finally feel as if I can articulate now. The right side of my body was completely paralyzed. I have regained the use of my arm and my hand."

Susan Navarro, 73

"(My) husband was a psychologist and died from Alzheimer’s this year. A slow, grueling process. I call it a hell world with the drip, drip of grief as he slowly lost all mental and bodily function. During this time my son, whom I had been estranged from, died from COVID (Delta variant). I have been working through grief over estrangement and events from his death including a stressful probate process."

Su Perry, 75

"I lost my first born, my only son, almost 32 years ago. It still feels like yesterday. I think about him every day. It's not natural for a parent to bury their child . No one knows the pain unless they have lost a child themselves. It's a different kind of pain. I can carry on a conversation and even laugh, but the whole time I'm screaming in the back of my head. I still cry. My other children are grown and on their own. I live alone. The nights are the worst. There are the what (ifs) that run through your head. The holidays, the date of his death and his birthday are the hardest to get through. There is nothing to compare this pain to. It's brutal. It doesn't go away. I try to keep it locked up in the back of my head but every once in a while it escapes and runs down my face."

Farah Davoodi, 34

"I recently lost my mother on Aug. 29, 2022. She was 68 years old when she passed. She lost her battle with two types of Lymphoma cancer . At this point, I couldn’t tell you which ones (was it T-cell or B-cell or both?) because I’ve just given up on remembering that part of her life and focusing on everything else she was about. Losing my mother is completely my identity now. I love talking about her, but as one friend put it, 'welcome to the dead parent club.' My mother immigrated to the U.S. from Peru in the late '70s to peruse a career as a neonatal ICU nurse. She and my father experienced many hardships throughout their road to their American dream but these last five to 10 years felt like things were falling into place. Until her cancer diagnosis.

Now a little a year after she’s passed, we’re finally trying to have kids. It’s a confusing process when your body isn’t functioning the way it should be. I do wish she was here but I know I’ll miss her even more when the time comes to actually have the child (and I’m hopeful it will). Her knowledge about all things babies was impressive to me. And I soaked up as much as I could from her. Little things my friends commented on years ago made me realize she taught me more than I thought I knew."

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28 episodes

Grieving Unapologetically: A Black Girl's Journey to Grieve Out Loud is a podcast that will captivate your heart, ignite your empathy, and inspire you to embrace the power of grieving out loud. Join us as we delve into the raw and unfiltered experiences of a Black woman's journey through grief. Our host, Kinyatta E. Gray, fearlessly shares her blogs, converted into podcast audio episodes, inviting you to witness the pain, resilience, and growth that comes from navigating loss in a world that often expects silence. "Grieving Unapologetically" is not just a podcast; it's a safe space for listeners to confront their grief, find comfort in shared experiences, and discover the healing power of community. With every episode, we strive to create a compassionate and inclusive environment, fostering conversations that transcend race, gender, and societal expectations. Tune in to "Grieving Unapologetically: A Black Girl's Journey to Grieve Out Loud" and embark on an informative exploration of loss, resilience, and the indomitable spirit of the human heart.  Kinyatta E. Gray is an Author,  Certified Master Coach, Entrepreneur and Founder of The Heart of Miss Bee, Inc., a 501 (c) (3) organization that exists to honor the legacy of her mother, the late Beverly E. Carroll. 

Grieving Unapologetically: A Black Girl's Journey To Grieve Out Loud Kinyatta E. Gray

  • Health & Fitness
  • 5.0 • 2 Ratings
  • JAN 19, 2024

What You Need is Grief Support, Not a Facebook "Like": An Invitation to Healing Hearts Grief Support and Social Club

As a certified life coach and grief awareness educator, I am sharing this blog converted to audio to address a  common misconception about grief support on social media platforms, particularly Facebook. While Facebook can be an excellent tool for connecting with others, it may not always provide the depth of support needed when navigating the complex journey of grief. Join our grief support group Healing Hearts Grief and Social Club. 

My Heart Bleeds for Those Who Will One Day Face The Unimaginable Heartbreak of Losing Their Mothers, Too...

In this blog coverted to audio, I want to share my personal journey of navigating the soul-crushing pain of losing my mother and the profound loneliness that accompanies it. However, through the darkness, I discovered resilience by throwing myself into honoring my mother and also deep empathy for women who have not yet faced this unimaginable loss. Learn more at The Heart of Miss Bee, Inc. 

  • JAN 18, 2024

THE IMPORTANCE OF BLACK AND BROWN WOMEN SEEKING AND RECEIVING ONGOING GRIEF SUPPORT

One of the reasons why black and brown women may hesitate to seek grief support is the stigma surrounding mental health in their communities. There is often a cultural expectation to be strong and resilient, making it difficult for women to express their emotions and seek help. By reaching out for grief support, women can break the silence and challenge the stigma, creating a safe space for themselves and others to heal.

I Didn't Receive Grief Support: Instead, I Faced Abandonment and Homophobia After Losing My Mom

No one should ever have to face homophobia and abandonment, especially when grieving the loss of a loved one.  My blog, converted to an audio recording, shares my heartbreaking experience, resilience, and will to go on while eliminating those who caused harm from my life for good.  Remember these words...You're worthy. You're Loved. You Mean Something To Someone, even if it isn't "them". 

Nurturing the Nurturers: Caring for Those Who Care for the Grieving

We must recognize that caregivers of the grieving carry an immense responsibility, and it's important to share how nurturers of grieving people must also care for themselves. As a caregiver, it is crucial to recognize your vital role in supporting others during their grief. Understand that your presence and support are invaluable; without you, their journey toward healing would be even more challenging. In this short blog converted to audio, learn self-care strategies for Griever Care-Givers.

  • JAN 17, 2024

When The Only Parent Left Is The Absent Parent

When the single parent suddenly dies.  The only parent left is the absent parent.  It's quite a complex and emotional issue when you think about it.  Do you instantly yearn for the absent parent's love and their presence in your life?  Or do you continue to honor their absence? Listen to this short blog converted into audio to my thoughts. 

  • © 2024 Grieving Unapologetically: A Black Girl's Journey To Grieve Out Loud

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Marc's Healing in 'Good Grief': A Journey Through Love, Loss, and Art

The journey of grief in art and friendship.

“Good Grief” delves into the complex world of mourning and healing, following the story of an artist, Marc, who seeks solace in Paris after the death of his husband. Accompanied by his two best friends, Marc finds comfort in their company and rekindles his passion for art. The film beautifully captures the unpredictable waves of emotions that come with loss, illustrating that grief is not a linear process but a space we learn to live with.

Unraveling Marc and Oliver’s Imperfect Marriage

As the narrative unfolds, we learn that Marc’s marriage with Oliver was far from perfect, filled with complex emotions and unspoken truths. Marc’s journey through grief is not about reaching a conclusion but about acknowledging and making peace with these complexities.

Confrontation and Vulnerability: Key Moments in “Good Grief”

A pivotal moment occurs when Oliver’s lover arrives at the Paris apartment, forcing Marc to confront Oliver’s infidelity and double life. This encounter, culminating in an awkward yet revealing dinner, allows Marc and his friends to express their mixed feelings about Oliver, acknowledging his flaws while still cherishing his memory.

The Ending: A Portrait of Slow Healing

“Good Grief” concludes with Marc hosting an art exhibition, signaling his slow journey towards healing. Surrounded by friends, Marc’s art becomes a testament to his emotional journey, capturing the nuances of grief and the gradual return to peace.

Tragic Departure: Oliver’s Untimely Death

The film portrays Oliver’s death subtly yet powerfully, avoiding graphic details and instead focusing on the emotional aftermath of his sudden passing. This approach emphasizes the shock and immediacy of loss, setting the stage for Marc’s journey through grief.

The Complexity of Marc and Oliver’s Relationship

The revelation of Oliver’s infidelity and the complexities of their open marriage add layers to Marc’s grief, portraying a relationship that was nuanced and fraught with unspoken rules and emotions. This complexity adds depth to Marc’s character and his process of mourning.

The Artistic Lens of Kris Knight

The film features the art of Kris Knight, whose work captures the varied expressions of masculinity and grief. Knight’s contribution brings a visual depth to Marc’s character, with approximately 15 to 17 pieces created specifically for the film , culminating in the poignant gallery scene.

“Good Grief” offers a nuanced exploration of loss, love , and the art of moving on. Through Marc’s journey, the film invites viewers to reflect on the personal nature of grief and the power of art and friendship in the healing process.

The Journey of Grief in Art and Friendship “Good Grief” delves into the complex world of mourning and healing, following the story of an artist, Marc, who seeks solace in Paris after the death of his husband. Accompanied by his two best friends, Marc finds comfort in their company and rekindles his passion for art. The film beautifully captures the unpredictable waves of emotions that come with loss, illustrating that grief is not a linear process but a space we learn to live with. Unraveling Marc and Oliver’s Imperfect Marriage As the narrative unfolds, we learn that Marc’s marriage with […]

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Support Our Cause

Journey Thru Grief is on a mission to bring suicide loss survivors out of the shadows so they can grieve without shame and surrounded by those who care about them. We appreciate  financial gifts for resource materials, marketing, and coaching scholarships. I respect that you have options of where to put your hard-earned money. Please consider supporting Journey Thru Grief in making a difference for those who grieve this debilitating loss.

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Sample Letters

Sample letter to accompany Book 1— A Time to Grieve, sent three weeks after the loss

Sample letter to accompany Book 2— Experiencing Grief, sent three months after the loss

Sample letter to accompany Book 3— Finding Hope and Healing, sent six months after the loss

Sample letter to accompany Book 4— Rebuilding and Remembering, sent eleven months after the loss

Stephen Ministries Logo

2045 Innerbelt Business Center Drive St. Louis, Missouri 63114 Phone: (314) 428-2600 Fax: (314) 428-7888

Stephen Ministries is a not-for-profit Christian education organization founded in 1975 that produces training and resources known for their excellence, practicality, psychological integrity, and theological depth. These resources cover topics such as caring ministry, assertive relating, spiritual gifts discovery, grief support, spiritual growth, and more.

Congregations and other organizations use these resources to strengthen and expand ministry. Individuals use them to improve their ability to relate to and care for others, grow in faith, and journey through life crises. Our 30-person staff is based in St. Louis, Missouri.

Quick Links

  • Care Receivers Tell Their Stories (Videos)
  • How to Begin Stephen Ministry in Your Church
  • The Bridge Leader’s Training Course
  • Request Information about Stephen Ministry
  • Journeying through Grief Books

IMAGES

  1. A Journey Through Grief

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  2. The Journey Through Grief: Reflections On Healing

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  3. The Christian’s Journey Through Grief

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  4. The Grief Journey after a Traumatic Loss

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  5. A Journey Through Grief

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  6. A Journey through Grief

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COMMENTS

  1. Suicide Grief and Loss

    Journey Thru Grief connects you with the tools and resources to move forward after suicide loss. Discover your journey with the help of others who have and are going through the same process. Loss resources Click for access to handouts SOLOS Spokane Survivor of a Loved One to Suicide Free peer support groups for Spokane suicide loss survivors.

  2. Journeying through Grief

    Journeying through Grief is a set of four short books to send to people at four crucial times during the first year after the loss of a loved one. Author Kenneth C. Haugk writes in a warm, caring style, with short, easy-to-read chapters. He walks alongside the reader through the grief journey, sharing helpful insights about grief, biblical ...

  3. The Journey Through Grief: The Six Needs of Mourning

    The Journey Through Grief: The Six Needs of Mourning by Center for Loss | Dec 21, 2023 | Articles by Alan D. Wolfelt, Ph.D. The death of someone loved changes our lives forever. And the movement from the "before" to the "after" is almost always a long, painful journey.

  4. Home

    With Journey Through Grief Coaching, you will become part of a select group of up to six people looking for more than just a once-in-awhile bereavement group. In this month-to-month program, you will discover more about the grieving process through shared experiences, personal insights, and the grief resources I've found beneficial in helping me navigate my grief.

  5. Coping with Grief

    Welcome. I am the author of the book Seasons of Solace. Before I knew that I would have a book published, I began this website in an attempt to explore the healing journey through grief. I believe that healing comes as we make space in our lives to acknowledge and express our pain.

  6. Journeying Through Grief (4-Book Set)

    $1895 FREE Shipping Other Sellers on Amazon Add to Cart $21.99 FREE Shipping on orders over $35.00 shipped by Amazon. Sold by: ARI store See Clubs Not in a club? Learn more Follow the author Kenneth C. Haugk Journeying Through Grief (4-Book Set) Paperback - January 1, 2004

  7. Hospice Foundation Of America

    The Journey Through Grief Facing our grief over the loss of a loved one can seem like a frightening journey into a foreign land of dark corners and scary terrain. We may wonder how we will survive the days ahead. Metaphorically, we might view the first days of shock and sorrow as walking on a barely lit unfamiliar road.

  8. Tips for Healthy Grieving: Your Journey Is Valid

    disappearance or withdrawing completely Healthy ways to grieve Have you wondered whether the way you've been feeling after experiencing a loss is "normal"? Perhaps you have shame around your...

  9. How To Deal With Grief : Life Kit : NPR

    1. Be with your grief. Tending to grief requires us to be with it, in all its misery and messiness. "We want to find a place where we can be present with it rather than be in resistance to it,"...

  10. PDF The Journey of Grief

    and work through your grief. Healing from grief is not easy, but you don't have to do it alone. For over 30 years Hospice of Santa Cruz County has supported people of all ages in recognizing and understanding the journey of grief. The information in this booklet has been compiled from many

  11. SOLOS Spokane

    Accept Support group for suicide loss meets in Spokane Valley twice per month.

  12. About Journey Thru Grief

    Journey Thru Grief is a social good company who, by way of social platforms, materials and public engagement, advocate and educate for survivors of suicide loss. Our primary focus is suicide postvention, also known as aftercare from a suicide loss. Resources The Four Phases of Suicide Loss Transitional Coaching Podcast Blog

  13. Journeying through Grief Giver's Guide

    Each letter gives you an opportunity to personalize your gift and caringly invite the person to read the book. Order the Journeying through Grief Giver's Guide. Contact Us. 2045 Innerbelt Business Center Drive St. Louis, Missouri 63114 Phone: (314) 428-2600 Fax: (314) 428-7888. About Us.

  14. Home

    Journeys through Grief was created to accompany those of us who have suffered the loss of a loved one and are traveling through their own grief. Grief is a slow and complicated process; we want to offer companionship, tools, and resources that will bring you a sense of support. This is your journey.

  15. Beyond the Broken Heart

    VIDEO. Beyond the Broken Heart - A Journey Through Grief is a dual-purpose resource. It is well-suited for anyone who has lost a loved one to death - a family member, child, friend, or spouse - who prefers to grieve alone or is unable to participate in a group. It is also the Participant Book for the grief group program.

  16. Journey Thru Grief

    Journey Thru Grief. 713 likes · 3 talking about this. To comfort people who are transitioning through a suicide loss. We provide resources and support. C

  17. Journeying through Grief Book 1

    A Time to Grieve Journeying through Grief —Book 1. Book 1 is designed to be sent three weeks after the death of a loved one, so it arrives just before the one-month anniversary of the loss—right around the time when the casserole dishes have been returned, the phone calls and visits have tapered off, and the painful reality of the loss is beginning to set in.

  18. Storefront

    Journey Thru Grief Storefront We have a new book! "The New World of Suicide Loss" was written with the new loss survivor in mind. While in the "Devastation Phase," there is so much confusion. This book will hopefully start a survivor on a path of healing. Now available on AMAZON! Purchase the book by clicking HERE!

  19. The Journey Through Grief

    Need 1. Acknowledging the reality of the death. This first need of mourning involves gently confronting the reality that someone you care about will never physically come back into your life again. Whether the death was sudden or anticipated, acknowledging the full reality of the loss may occur over weeks and months.

  20. Grief stages: How five people are grieving loss, death, identity

    1:49. Grief affects us all - but not in ways we always expect. People die, yes, but so do pets. We can grieve dreams, jobs, our health, past versions of ourselves. Grief is not linear; it does ...

  21. Using Journeying through Grief with Stephen Ministry

    The set of four Journeying through Grief books is a powerful resource for any individual, congregation, or organization to give to grieving persons in the first year after the loss. In addition, giving these books provides special opportunities for Stephen Ministry congregations. Giving Journeying through Grief books can—Encourage people to seek care from a Stephen Minister.

  22. ‎Grieving Unapologetically: A Black Girl's Journey To Grieve Out Loud

    Grieving Unapologetically: A Black Girl's Journey to Grieve Out Loud is a podcast that will captivate your heart, ignite your empathy, and inspire you to embrace the power of grieving out loud. Join us as we delve into the raw and unfiltered experiences of a Black woman's journey through grief. Our…

  23. Marc's Healing in 'Good Grief': A Journey Through Love, Loss, and Art

    Marc's journey through grief is not about reaching a conclusion but about acknowledging and making peace with these complexities. The Journey of Grief in Art and Friendship "Good Grief ...

  24. Support Journey Thru Grief

    Connect with us! Find Your Grief Journey If you have found yourself in this place of suicide loss and you are struggling, we know you are experiencing many emotions. Find your journey today! The 4 Phases of Suicide Loss

  25. Journeying through Grief Sample Letters

    Journeying through Grief Giver's Guide. Sample Letters. Sample letter to accompany Book 1—A Time to Grieve, sent three weeks after the loss. Sample letter to accompany Book 2—Experiencing Grief, sent three months after the loss. Sample letter to accompany Book 3—Finding Hope and Healing, sent six months after the loss.