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A designer’s dream and a builder’s vision seem to have recently coalesced rather nicely to create the Agile 42, a brand new high-performance, all-carbon luxury cruiser from the Netherlands.

Built by VMG Yachtbuilders and launched in September 2017 the Agile 42 (Karma) has been designed for discerning yachties who want to combine speed and comfort. The Agile 42 is built entirely of carbon fibre to create a lightweight yacht. However this yacht is equipped with a full on interior with enough space and all the necessities as well as a large cockpit to make for comfortable but very fast cruising.

This Agile yacht is characterised by its ultra modern design based on the latest insights in naval architecture. The yacht ticks all the boxes for the modern allround sailor who is not prepared to compromise when it comes to looks, comfort and performance.

For weight saving and quiet propulsion she has Lithium-ion Super B batteries, 8kW at 48V DC, powering a 10kW Oceanvolt electric motor that has regeneration capabilities.

Agile 42 in media

Yachting World

Seahorse Magazine

agile 42 sailboat

Technical details of the Agile 42:

  • Designer:  Simonis Voogd Design
  • Boatbuilder: Agile Yachts / VMG Yachtbuilders
  • Country: Netherlands
  • Lenght: 12,70 m
  • Length (Waterline): 12,55 m
  • Beam: 4,10 m
  • Draft:  2,40 m
  • Weight: 4800 kg
  • Electric motor system: Oceanvolt SD10 sail drive electric motor system
  • Electric motor nominal power: 10 kW
  • Electric motor system voltage: 48 V
  • Electric motor system weight: 46.5 kg
  • Propulsion batteries: Super-B 8kWh Lithium-ion battery pack
  • Charger: Victron Energy Skylla-TG 48/25

agile 42 sailboat

Written by Anna

View all posts by: Anna

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Thursday, december 13, 2018, agile 42: a dream boat.

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agile 42 sailboat

agile 42 sailboat

agile 42 sailboat

I am off to buy a lottery ticket, amazing boat.

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About this project

Sailmon products onboard, agile 42 karma.

Type : High performance cruiser LOA : 12.55m Manufacturer : Agile Yachts Designed by : Simonis Voogd Design Built : 2017

Built by VMG Yachtbuilders and launched in September 2017 the Agile 42 (Karma) has been designed for discerning yachties who want to combine speed and comfort. The Agile 42 is built entirely of carbon fibre to create a lightweight yacht. However this yacht is equipped with a full on interior with enough space and all the necessities as well as a large cockpit to make for comfortable but very fast cruising. This Agile yacht is characterized by its ultra modern design based on the latest insights in naval architecture. The yacht ticks all the boxes for the modern allround sailor who is not prepared to compromise when it comes to looks, comfort and performance.

Onboard configuration Agile 42 Karma

Click on the instruments for more information

2x Element 10 display 100% customizable, 10-inch state of the art graphics displays, offering crisp and crystal-clear readability in all conditions and designed to withstand the most extreme environments.

1x Model E4 Silver processor High performance over the air sailing processors delivering fast, accurate and reliable data, for every sensor, every device, for everyone, everywhere.

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Already a few weeks ago we had a test sail together with the owner of the Agile, the designer (Simonis Voogd design) and some of the suppliers and builders of the yacht. It was blowing around 20kts and that was also the speed we reached downwind. The Agile42 shows that you can really have a full interior yacht (HPLC High Performance Luxury Cruiser), with more than excellent speed and handling performance. We are very pleased. We can not wait to test it in deeper waters to put it even more to the test! Hereby a cool movie of this test sail.

This month the Agile42 will be featured in Zeilen Magazine with a full test, Yacht magazine (featured yachts), Clubracer.be and several social media channels.

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Tag: Agile 42

Agile 42: talking to vmg yachtbuilders and designer maarten voogd.

Agile 42: talking to VMG Yachtbuilders and designer Maarten Voogd

Entrepreneurs are demanding, uncompromising people, at least the successful ones. They’re the market Tim van Daal, CEO of VMG Yachtbuilders , and designer Maarten Voogd decided to target with a new brand, Agile Yachts , which had its first launch, the Agile 42, in late 2017.

Voogd and van Daal have been friends for over 20 years and both are based in Enkhuizen, Holland, which is where they hatched the initial plans for Agile Yachts. “We were thinking about what kind of boat we should be building now to target a group of successful professionals between 40 and 50 years old,” says van Daal. “What kind of boat would they want?”

Voogd already had a boat in mind. “I designed this boat on spec for myself,” says Voogd. “My brief to myself was more speed, so I could do the occasional medium distance race, and more comfort, so I can sail with my family. It was important to be able to sail the boat shorthanded, and that she handled easily.”

‘Full-size tank testing’

Agile 42

Voogd’s work with the Fareast brand enabled the Agile 42 to be fast-tracked, just one year from design to launch. “Over the last four years we have designed a full range of sportsboats but every design had some improvements on the previous one. The hull shape for the Agile 42 is an evolution of that work – full-size tanktesting, you might call it.

“It is a low resistance hull shape with a very flat run aft, but minimal wetted surface,” adds Voogd. “This makes the boat very slippery in all conditions. The SA:D ratio is of modern proportions but not extreme, accentuating the efficiency of the used hull shape.”

Agile 42

“The choice for single rudder over twin rudders is to minimise wetted surface, weight and cost,” Voogd continues. “The hull shape doesn’t lift the rudder out of the water that quickly so control is not an issue. The soft chines are formed out of the underwater hull shape and the maximum deck beam we allowed ourselves. I wanted the boat to be interesting for shorthanded sailing so I added 750 litres of water ballast per side with additional 250 litres in the aft corner each side for downwind trim.”

Full carbon build

Agile 42

The build process was a close collaboration between Voogd and van Daal’s VMG Yachtbuilders. “We CNC milled the frames, plated them and fixed Corecell foam to that, then we laminated the outer skin with pre-soaked carbon fibre, vacuumed it, and the carbon inner skin was vacuum-injected. Both skins have 0.8mm of carbon, two layers, and there are unidirectional carbon fibre reinforcements in specific areas. There is a web frame under the floor with 30 layers of carbon that supports the keel. The steering system is chain-and-cable with a carbon quadrant, by Jefa, and she has an Axxon Composite mast. The whole rig is 150kg and the boom is only 15kg. For Code sails she has a 3m telescopic bowsprit, with 1.5m fixed and 1.5m retractable.”

The dual-purpose nature of this boat is most visible in the cockpit, where Voogd has drawn an L-shaped bench to starboard and offset the companionway to port. “It’s an important feature, and one I like. It makes the cockpit a fantastic social area after sailing and is not in the way when racing. More importantly, it enabled a very efficient galley layout, and an almost symmetrical interior which gives the boat a spacious feeling inside.”

Home-from-home styling

Agile 42

The design of the interior can be placed in the client’s hands. “Owners are invited to bring their own stylist,” explains van Daal. “This target group tends to have a famous stylist that does their family home, holiday home, cars, office, so why not bring that guy over to the yard to style the boat? The client really liked the idea and brought in Eric Kant, his stylist.”

Agile 42

The result showcases stylish, muted tones in leather, thin teak veneers on cored joinery, dimmable LED lighting throughout illuminating the carbon fibre hull and gunmetal deckhead.

For weight saving and quiet propulsion she has Lithium Super B batteries, 8kW at 48v DC, powering a 10kW Oceanvolt electric motor that has regeneration capabilities. Deck gear is by Harken and B&G sensors drive Sailmon instruments with navigation controlled by mobile devices.

‘Driving lessons in a Lamborghini’

“The owner is delighted,” beams van Daal. “He’s been out in her about five times now but he’s not a very experienced sailor – the last boat he had was a Laser. He says it’s like having driving lessons in a Lamborghini! He’s a fast learner, a very intelligent guy. He said ‘I know I’m extremely demanding but this is more than I ever expected.’ We did a nice job.”

Agile 42

“It’s delivering so much more than even we expected. Everytime Maarten Voogd joins us for a sail, he says the boat keeps on surprising him. In 30 knots of wind you never hear anything in the boat, it’s completely quiet, which is quite rare for a carbon boat. It’s so stiff, that’s one of the things we’re so happy about. Maarten said ‘I’ve built lots of boats, but never with this level of quality,’ which was a great compliment.”

“The biggest surprise is the actual feel of the boat,” adds Voogd. “It feels so much bigger than a 42-footer, very stiff in structure and sailing behaviour. It’s a real blast, downwind as well as upwind. So far we have achieved 20 knots of boatspeed on the IJsselmeer in 20-25 knots of TWS.”

“We found a unique point between cruising and racing with a lot of comfort in super high quality,” says van Daal. “It very much appeals to my own preferences about sailing. This is a boat I could have myself so it is extremely exciting.”

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Seahorse Magazine

Hybrid agility

Hybrid agility

The goal with the Dutch-built Agile 42 was to identify and then deliver a very different type of offer in terms of high performance and quality…

A designer’s dream and a builder’s vision seem to have recently coalesced rather nicely to create the Agile 42, a brand new high-performance, all-carbon luxury cruiser from the Netherlands.

Successful entrepreneurs are hard to please. They’re demanding, uncompromising and don’t easily settle for second best. They’re also the market that Tim van Daal, CEO of VMG Yachtbuilders, and designer Maarten Voogd decided to target with a new brand, Agile Yachts, of which the Agile 42 was the first example to be launched last winter.

Voogd is one half of the design partnership Simonis Voogd, formed with Cape Town-based Alexander Simonis in 1991. Voogd and van Daal have been friends for over 20 years and both are based in the town of Enkhuizen on the Ijsselmeer, which is where they hatched the initial plans for Agile Yachts.

Agile: adj, able to move quickly and easily. The name is a promising start but how would they go about satisfying this exacting clientele?

‘We were thinking about what kind of boat we should build to target a new generation of successful professionals between 40 and 50 years old,’ says van Daal. ‘What kind of boat would they want? It was quite an organic process, starting with talking about what we like ourselves…’

It was fortunate then that both were more or less their own target market, and even more fortunate that Voogd already had a boat in mind. ‘I designed this boat on spec for myself as a follow-up to my own 35-footer,’ says Voogd. ‘If you like, my brief was more speed, so I could do the occasional medium-distance race, and more comfort, so I can sail more pleasantly with my family.

‘It was important to be able to sail the boat shorthanded, and that she handled easily. Having sailed extensively on the Fareast 31R and 28R over the last four years I know how well a boat like this can sail – now the challenge was to combine this with a simple but functional and stylish interior.’

Voogd’s work with the Fareast brand enabled the process to be fast-tracked, taking just one year from design to launch. ‘Over the last four years we have designed a full range of sportsboats, but every design had improvements over its predecessor. The hull shape for the Agile 42 is an evolution of this work – full-scale tank testing, you might call it!

‘We settled on a clean and tidy hull shape with a very flat run aft, but minimal wetted surface,’ adds Voogd. ‘This makes the boat slippery in all conditions. The SA:DSPL ratio is of modern proportions, but not extreme, accentuating the efficiency of the hull shape. However, the bow and chamfered hull deck joint are driven more by aesthetics than by performance!’

‘The choice of a single rudder over twin rudders is to minimise wetted surface, weight and cost,’ Voogd continues. ‘The hull shape doesn’t lift the rudder out of the water that quickly, so control is not really an issue. The soft chines are dictated by the maximum deck beam we allowed ourselves.

‘I wanted the boat to be interesting for shorthanded sailing so I added 750 litres of water ballast per side with an additional 250 litres in the transom corners for downwind trim.’

The build was a collaboration between Voogd and van Daal’s VMG Yachtbuilders. ‘VMG was started about 30 years ago under another name as a classic carpentry specialist yard,’ says van Daal. ‘When I came to the company in the middle of 2014 the former director stepped down and I took the lead. That’s also when we changed the name to VMG.

‘As a second speciality we introduced high-quality composite work. It was an easy decision to make because the yard was completely rebuilt in 2012 after a fire. Our premises are start-of-theart with full climate control and excellent insulation, the perfect conditions for composite work.

‘We already had a 3D measuring machine and a CNC milling machine so almost everything was there. We have a dedicated hall for composite work where we have a lamination machine; this is all well separated from the carpentry department which is actually in another building.

‘The keel bulb was cast by a specialist company but we made the mould in which it was cast. The welded keel fin was also fabricated by a specialist contractor. Apart from that we didn’t have to outsource anything.

‘We CNC milled the frames to which we bonded the foam hull core,’ explains van Daal. ‘Then we laminated on the outer skin with carbon pre-preg, vacuumed it, and the carbon inner skin was then added using resin infusion. Both skins have 0.8mm of carbon in two layers, and there are unidirectional carbon fibre reinforcements in the appropriate areas. There is a web frame under the floor with 30 layers of carbon that supports the keel.

‘The steering system is chain and cable with a carbon quadrant, engineered and produced by Jefa. It’s a plug-and-play system that always works perfectly. She has an Axxon Composite mast. The whole rig is 150kg and the boom only 15kg. It’s a beautiful rig, stepped by Tuned Rigs in Enkhuizen. For Code sails she has a 3m telescopic bowsprit, with 1.5m fixed and 1.5m retractable.’

On deck the dual-purpose, hybrid nature of this boat is most clearly displayed in the cockpit, where Voogd has drawn an L-shaped bench to starboard and offset the companionway to port. ‘It’s an important feature, and one I like. It makes the cockpit a fantastic social area after sailing and is not in the way when racing. More importantly, it enabled an efficient galley layout, and an almost symmetrical interior, which gives a spacious feeling.’

The Agile 42 can be ordered as a stripped-out racer, but the first boat is the High Performance Luxury Cruiser (HPLC) version, which features bespoke interior design. ‘Owners are invited to bring their own stylist,’ explains van Daal. ‘This target group tends to have a well-known stylist to take care of the family home, holiday home, office, even sometimes the family aircraft, so why not bring that guy to style the boat? The client really liked the idea and in this case he brought in Eric Kant, his stylist.’

Any potential performancelimiting issues with mahogany sideboards and grand pianos were soon sidelined as Kant sails too, so he understands how critical weight is to performance. The result showcases stylish, muted tones in leather, thin teak veneer over core joinery, dimmable LED lighting throughout illuminating the carbon fibre hull and gunmetal deckhead.

agile 42 sailboat

For weight saving and quiet propulsion she has Lithium Super B batteries, 8kW at 48v DC, powering a 10kW Oceanvolt electric motor that has regeneration capabilities. Deck gear is by Harken and B&G sensors drive Sailmon instruments with navigation controlled by mobile devices.

So have they managed to satisfy the owner? ‘He’s delighted,’ beams van Daal. ‘He’s been out in her about five times now, but he’s not a very experienced sailor – the last boat he had was a Laser. He says it’s like having driving lessons in a Lamborghini! He’s a fast learner, a very intelligent guy. He said, “I know I’m extremely demanding, but this is more than I ever expected.”

‘The boat is delivering so much more than even we expected. Every time Maarten Voogd joins us for a sail he says it keeps on surprising him. In 30kt of wind you never hear anything, it’s completely quiet, which is rare for a carbon boat. It just doesn’t give anything, it’s so stiff – that’s one of the things we’re so happy about. Maarten himself said, “I’ve built lots of boats, but never with this level of quality,” which was a great compliment.’

‘The biggest surprise is the actual feel of the boat,’ adds Voogd. ‘It feels so much bigger than a 42-footer, very stiff both structurally and in sailing behaviour. It’s a real blast, downwind as well as upwind. So far we have achieved 20kt of boatspeed on the Ijsselmeer in 20-25kt of TWS.’

The success of any brand is measured in a healthy order book so at this early stage in the brand’s genesis is there evidence that demand for the Agile 42 (priced from €595,000 ex tax for the raw race version) exists? ‘Absolutely,’ says van Daal. ‘We get enquiries every day, one in five of which is serious. In my opinion the interest is there because there’s not much choice in this market. We found a unique point between cruising and racing with a lot of comfort and all with super high quality.

‘One of our prospects has a team of good race sailors that go around Europe every year sailing the bigger ORC regattas. He said he was looking for a boat somewhere between the GP42 he used to own and the X-41 he sails now, and that’s exactly where this boat is.

‘It also very much appeals to my own sailing tastes. This is a boat I could very happily have myself!’

Click here for more information on Agile Yachts »

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Agile Yachts

² navigation, agile 42 featured in yachting world.

Agile yachts is featured in #YachtingWorld this month in the ‘new boat’ section. Next to that we can now announce that there will be a full article about the Agile 42 in the next Seahorse magazine. So everybody run to the store and get the April edition of Seahorse magazine!

Agile ® Interior

Agile 42 "Karma" : Carbon cruising yacht - cosy and super-fast

Alexander Worms

 ·  18.03.2023

The Code Zero pulls strongly - with the airstream so much that the true wind is overtaken

A little too much rudder pressure for such a design, the tester secretly thinks to himself on board the Agile 42 - such boats like to sail quite neutrally, because too much angle of attack on the rudder simply slows you down. The solution also immediately springs to mind: perhaps the main a little flatter, the jib with more belly, which should lift the sail pressure point a little forwards. The boat should be so sensitive to trim that only small adjustments are enough to reduce the deflection of the wheel.

Professionals are at work on board the cruising yacht

But it's better not to say anything, as the professional boatman, the shipyard's project manager and none other than Nicholas Heiner, the Laser and Finn world champion, are still on board. It would be presumptuous to give the professionals tips on how to make the boat faster.

When the aforementioned Nicholas Heiner takes over the helm - he does so with two fingers on the wheel - he realises that the rudder pressure is too high. His instructions are to outhaul, i.e. flatten the main and move the genoa's centre of gravity forwards. This creates more profile at the front. The almost two-metre tall athlete with the impressive upper arms grins with satisfaction. "It's better like this," he says and adds: "She's now much more neutral on the rudder."

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The YACHT tester is also satisfied: in the certainty of being able to trim yacht sails to at least world champion standard, he leans back and enjoys the ride. Time to let his gaze wander over the modern sailing equipment.

There is a lot to discover. Tim van Daal, head of the VMG Yachtbuilders shipyard in Enkhuizen, has something to say about every detail. "We moved the companionway to port. This allowed us to install the galley with a central island below and create a seating and sunbathing area above," he explains. Galley, seat and sunbathing area on a carbon racer? To understand this contradiction, it is important to shed light on the genesis of the project. "The Agile concept is actually based on an idea by Marten Voogd, the Dutch-based half of the Simonis Voogd office. He was looking for the next logical boat for himself after his current Max Fun 35. As a designer, he naturally drew it himself," says van Daal.

The plans for the carbon cruising yacht are taking shape

The idea for a rather radical carbon yacht with water ballast and a minimal interior already existed. As did the shipyard that could build such a cruising yacht, because VMG, although still quite new on the market, has a lot of expertise in the composite sector thanks to its experienced employees. Now van Daal and Voogd both come from Enkhuizen on the IJsselmeer. They know each other and find each other quickly. What was still missing was a customer for the project.

A third member of the Enkhuizen connection helps: Gerd Schootstra, skipper of the legendary ex-Whitbread yacht "Flyer", based in Enkhuizen (see YACHT 21/2014). On a sailing trip, a childhood friend tells him about his arduous search for a shipyard to build him a very fast carbon fibre tourer. Schootstra switches gears immediately and makes contact with van Daal and Voogd. The Enkhuizen connection works.

The owner, a Dutchman, is immediately enthusiastic and tears up the ready-to-sign contracts with an Italian shipyard. Instead, he places an order in his home country. The IT entrepreneur, who had previously only sailed Lasers, wanted an easy-to-operate and, above all, fast cruising yacht. It should also glide like a Laser.

The cruising yacht should be fast and light

This in turn fits in perfectly with Marten Voogd's ideas: fast and light. As it turns out later in the construction process, the owner and designer have quite different ideas when it comes to the word "light". However, the shipyard will masterfully resolve this contradiction.

Either way, the requirement to be fast and light makes for a lot of fun on the water. The fairway on the Eastern Scheldt bends slightly to leeward, the cross is over. Now the Agile is deep enough for the Code Zero. On the wind, the black and white yacht is speeding through the water at a good nine knots in eight knots of true wind. The tide stagnates at high tide, so it doesn't help - the Agile is actually faster than the wind. That alone is impressive, but even more so is the ease with which the performance can be called up. Van Daal: "I regularly receive photos from the owner showing him gliding along at 12 or 13 knots while his children are asleep on the sunbathing area in the cockpit. He then sails the large cruising yacht almost alone."

You want to believe it. Of course, all the fittings are of the finest quality, nothing snags, everything runs very smoothly, and the electric winch in the centre of the superstructure helps with the last few centimetres, which can be operated perfectly when standing in the companionway, including the best view of the sails. It's no surprise that the sails are also made of carbon fibre, are strong and weigh hardly anything. The perfectly tuned autopilot also helps when operating with a small crew.

The "Karma" is characterised by its sophisticated design

But the real highlight lies in the lightweight construction. Because if you have to move less weight, you can get by with a smaller fabric. The Agile has 100 square metres on the wind. By comparison, an XP-44 carries a good 10 square metres more. At 4.8 tonnes, the Agile cruising yacht weighs just under four tonnes less than the yacht from Denmark, which is also not suspected of being particularly slow on the water. These four tonnes make the difference, they make it easier for the cruising yacht to convert the pressure from the rig into propulsion. As a result, the forces on the fittings, halyards and sheets are reduced. And this, in turn, is clearly noticeable to the user.

Now four tonnes, which is pretty much exactly the ballast content of the Xp-44, is not just found anywhere in the ship, it is only achieved through consistent lightweight construction everywhere.

A few examples: The carbon fibre laminate of the outer and inner sandwich layers is just under one millimetre thick. It is laminated over a foam core that lies on CNC-milled moulds. This is initially done by hand lay-up and is then compacted in a vacuum. An insulated tent is then built over the hull in the hall and a temperature profile precisely specified by the manufacturer is run through with heaters. This takes several days, goes up to around 60 degrees Celsius and back down to room temperature. This process is closely monitored and ensures a homogeneous and firm structure.

The whole thing is then turned and the carbon fibre is applied from the inside using a vacuum injection process. The deck is also injected under vacuum. There is no inner shell. You can see the inside of the deck and hull in all its carbon fibre beauty and also the screws of the deck fittings in the sky.

On the Agile, this looks more like a stylistic element and less like careless boatbuilding. At best, a little varnish, as in the aft compartments, covers the laminate here and there. It is then grey to conceal the black of the carbon. Only the wet room is panelled on the inside and is a pretty light colour.

Carbon fibre is used everywhere on board the "Karma"

The furniture and other structural components are also made of foam and covered with a teak veneer. Of course, the mast and boom are also made of carbon. All halyards are only sheathed where absolutely necessary - for example in the area of the clamps and winches. The bosun pulls them into the mast after each use of the boat, fitted with care lines to protect the pure Dyneema core from UV light.

The keel fin, on which the 2.2 tonne lead bomb hangs, is made of duplex stainless steel. This is light and strong at the same time and does not break as quickly if it touches the ground as would be the case with carbon fibre. In addition, the fin is inserted into the hull about 25 centimetres inwards in a conical recess, for which the shipyard has specially removed a laminating mould from the fin. This ensures that the forces of the keel are optimally transferred to the hull structure, creating a very strong connection.

The drive is purely electric. The lithium batteries in combination with the electric motor weigh less than a diesel unit, which would then have to have additional service batteries and a tank. In addition, the eight-kilowatt battery bank provides sufficient power for the systems when sailing.

When the wind cracks ten knots, it's time for the 200 square metre gennaker. Drop it, raise the sheet, tighten the backstay and hoist it up again. Oh yes: and extend the gennaker pole. On the retractable half, the owner tells us in English that he thinks fate is a fickle mistress: "Karma" - as he has named his racy beauty - is a "bitch". Perhaps a hint to fellow travellers on one regatta or another.

The cruising yacht is very efficient - even under difficult conditions

A few gentle gusts build up to 12 to 13 knots. The wave immediately breaks off at the stern, the large Sailmon clock on the rear wall of the cabin shows a 10. This happens very casually, very calmly, almost provocatively equanimously; the ship radiates with every one of its carbon fibres that it is only at the very beginning of its possibilities.

The 21 knots achieved so far by the shipyard on the IJsselmeer in around 28 knots of wind are easy to believe. "And we didn't feel like we were riding on a razor's edge. Everything was still cool, even if it took a few more people," grins van Daal. Control is the key word. Steering without play, a large rudder blade that, thanks to the flat profile, is not overwhelmed when the water flows past a little faster and a deck layout that really works.

The owner also needs control. After all, his sailing experience comes from a Laser. "He puts it like this: it's like learning to drive a car in a Bugatti," says van Daal. The Agile does this without complaint. And when it's not in regatta mode with lots of people on or downwind, water ballast tanks help to find the right balance. Two are installed amidships on the outside for upwind courses, each with a capacity of 750 litres, and two aft on the outside for better planing, each with 250 litres.

Clever: Thanks to a pumping system, the tanks can be pumped over in a short time when tacking or jibing so that the new bow is immediately fully stable. The whole process takes about two minutes.

In the light conditions on the test day, the ballast remains neutral. Secretly, 10 knots more wind would be the tester's wish list, then the 17 to 18 knot speed in 22 knots of wind promised by both the shipyard manager and Polare could be tried out. If you're already driving a Bugatti on an empty motorway, then the foot wants to go down too. Never mind, maybe next time.

Despite its light weight, the interior is sophisticated

This leaves time to take care of the interior. You might not expect much from this on a carbon racer - but as I said, things turned out differently. Whilst the designer's mind was buzzing with tubular bunks and spirit cookers, the owner asked for a handsome interior from his own interior designer and some comfort. Lightweight? Sure. Do without? No, thank you. Successful entrepreneurs are a little more demanding, after all, they have squared the circle professionally themselves. So why not a shipyard and its designer?

And so suddenly things like a cooker with oven, an electric and therefore heavy toilet, teak surfaces and a heating system came into play. The latter is fuelled by diesel, which requires the installation of a tank on a cruising yacht with electric propulsion. And that, you guessed it, also weighs a few kilos. But the effort is worth it.

Below deck, the cruising yacht is downright cosy. If it were a flat, it would have exposed concrete, cable ducts and wooden floors. The interior is not cool or aloof, but invitingly practical. In addition to the open carbon fibre, there is fine leather in the best finish, two aft compartments with real beds, a foredeck that can be cleverly separated with a vertical roller blind and a wet room where you can even take a shower. The owner's family may also like to come on board.

The shipyard has worked its magic. The worktops in the kitchen are, no wonder, made of carbon fibre. The cooker is the lightest on the market and the batteries for the drive are positioned in the centre of gravity of the boat. It is this consistency down to the last detail that ensures the boat remains what the type designation promises: agile.

yacht/agile-42_1454b66ca058b625bc6da1de8a3c2dcc

Tell me I’ll forget... show me I'll remember... involve me and I'll understand!

An international family, we love our strange name, lots of talk and lots of action, grownups with crayons, all together now.

agile42, founded in Berlin in 2007, provides world-class expertise, training and coaching on Lean-Agile development methods including Scrum, Kanban, Systems thinking and Lean and Agile Leadership. We have a proven approach for managing the adoption of Lean-Agile methods and transforming organizations to achieve better business outcomes. Our customers confirm their ability to deliver measurable results:

  • Faster time-to-market and responsiveness
  • Accelerated ROI (Return on Investment)
  • Higher customer satisfaction
  • More engaged and motivated employees

The agile42 team enjoys a global presence, operating in Germany, the United States, Canada, Denmark, the Netherlands, Italy, Finland, Turkey and South Africa. Our coaches have proven expertise and top credentials in the industry; many of our coaches are Certified Enterprise Coaches and Certified Scrum Trainers: only a few dozen people worldwide can boast both credentials. In addition, we have staff certified as Kanban Coaching Professionals (KCP), an elite club with only a around 60 members worldwide.

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Agile 42: Coal Instead Of Cheese

Agile 42: Coal Instead Of Cheese

Video: Agile 42: Coal Instead Of Cheese

Video: Agile 42: Coal Instead Of Cheese

2024 Author : Allison Derrick | [email protected] . Last modified: 2023-12-17 05:04

The shipyard announces an "interior sufficient for touring". This can also be designed with your own interior designer, because of course there should be little lacking in terms of comfort over the 12.70 meter length. Nevertheless, the themed weight plays a significant role, because anyone who builds light hulls has more room for maneuver in terms of the interior and is still on the move quickly. The ship should weigh 4,800 kilograms with a rather simple interior design, an XP 44 weighs 8,700 kilograms. Hull number 1 of the Agile is a little heavier, the owner wants self-tacking jib, electric winches and wooden interiors.

Agile 42

The hull under construction. Smooth surfaces thanks to vacuum injection

46 percent ballast means a keel weight of 2.2 tons at a depth of 2.40 meters. Coupled with around 100 upwind square meters, which corresponds to a sail load rating of 5.9, power is therefore not an issue. The name Simonis / Voogd also ensures this - the office is responsible for the design. Further optional features: A water ballast system with four tanks, one on each side for up and down wind, based on the system in an Open 40 and a propulsion system from Oceanvolt, which collects energy from the water from around 5 knots on request. This makes the ship self-sufficient in terms of energy.

On lower courses, the long bowsprit, which partly retracts into the crash box, and a gennaker of 185 square meters ensure a lot of pressure. ThemBugspriet: The fixed part is about a meter long. Code Zero is used on it. If the gennaker is high, it can be extended a further 1.40 meters. Then the forestay hardly disturbs the jibe anymore.

The narrow foredeck, a slightly negative stem and the wide stern should make the numbers on the log display continue to rise even when the hull speed is reached. They are on the side of the off-center companionway. There are no mast instruments. “Agile is a fun machine, but the fun doesn't stop for us in the port. Of course it is difficult not to let the ship become too heavy, but no one wants tubular berths, says Tim van Daal, VMG shipyard manager. Depending on the customer's wishes, the interior is dominated by respectable simplicity. The Agile 42 is available from 595,000, - Euro excluding VAT.

VMG was founded only a few years ago and emerged from Zeeman Yachtbau. In addition to the construction of carbon and custom yachts, the Enkhuizer portfolio also includes the series of puffins, sturdy touring ships, often with variable drafts. But VMG is also blowing a new sail life into the puffins by turning away from steel construction to a modern composite construction method. The shipyard wants to make a name for itself as the address for the high-quality construction of composite yachts, regardless of whether they are made of glass or coal. And no matter whether 100 percent according to customer requirements or from one of the shipyard's own series.

www.agileyachts.nl

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Run The SailBoat Agile Exercise or Sailboat Retrospective

agile 42 sailboat

This exercise can be found in the book  Getting Value out of Agile Retrospectives . A book that was written by me and  Ben Linders  with a foreword by  Esther Derby .

Sailboat Exercise

What you can expect to get out of this technique.

From my experience, this technique is quite appreciated by teams because of its simplicity.

This exercise helps teams to define a vision of where they want to go; it helps them to identify risks during their path and allows them to identify what slows them down and what helps them to achieve their objectives.

When you would use this technique

I believe this method is quite simple and does not require any special occasion. Although, it might be interesting for situations when a retrospective is conducted with more than one team at the same time.

I had a situation, not long time ago that two teams worked together and because of their level of dependency on each other, they decided to conduct a common retrospective because of some ongoing issues.

Using the SailBoat exercise can be extremely interesting because we simply put the name of both teams on the SailBoat and we remind everyone that we are on the same SailBoat navigating in the same direction.

This technique reveals all the good things and less positive things performed by a team.

How to do it

This retrospective is quite simple. First, we draw a SailBoat, rocks, clouds, and a couple of islands like it is shown in the picture on a flip chart.

The islands represent the teams´ goals/vision. They work every day to achieve these islands. The rocks represent the risks they might encounter in their vision.

The anchor on the SailBoat is everything that is slowing them down on their journey. The clouds and the wind represent everything that is helping them to reach their goal.

Having the picture on the wall, write what the team vision is or what our goals are as a team. After that, start a brainstorming session with the team allowing them to dump their ideas within different areas.

Give them ten minutes to write their ideas. Afterward, give 5 minutes to each person to read out loud their ideas.

At this point discuss together with the team how can they continue to practice what was written on the "clouds" area. These are good ideas that help the team, and they need to continue with these ideas.

Then spend some time discussing how can the team mitigate the risks that were identified. Finally, together with the team chose the most important issue that is slowing the team down.

If you do not find an agreement within the team about the most important topic that should be tackled, you can use the vote dots.

In the end, you can define what steps can be done to fix the problem, and you can close the retrospective.

Like many other exercises, this exercise does not require a collocation of a team. You can use, for example, tools like Lino, to apply the exercise to non-collocated teams. This tool allows us to do everything that we need to run this exercise.

What do you think? Your feedback is always extremely important for me, so please leave me your comments.

An Agile Retrospective is an event that ́s held at the end of each iteration in Agile Development and it serves for the team to reflect on how to become more effective, so they can tune and adjusts its behavior accordingly.

I believe the SailBoat exercise is quite a simple Agile Retrospective Exercise and does not require any special occasion.

If you are interested in getting some extra Agile Retrospectives exercises, I created a blog post with dozens of  Agile Retrospectives Ideas , check them and see if you find something interesting.

Agile-Retrospective-Accelerator

"Starfish exercise" or "Starfish Retrospective"

The world cafe - agile retrospective technique, similar blog posts.

agile 42 sailboat

Find Out How To Use Kudo Cards in Agile Retrospectives

agile 42 sailboat

The Instant Retrospective

Tech Agilist

The Sailboat Retrospective is a fun and creative way for teams to reflect on the sprint and identify areas for improvement. It’s called “Sailboat” because the metaphor of a sailboat helps the team visualize their journey, the obstacles they faced, and the direction they want to sail towards in the future. The Sailboat or Speedboat Method for Sprint Retrospectives is an easy way to: adopt, reflect and map the team’s way forward easily, in a fun, tactile and visual way. It helps the team to reflect on what’s going well and what could be better, analyze their sails and anchors and identify opportunities for improvement or change.

The idea is that the team is on a sailboat, heading towards their goal while dealing with winds and icebergs along the way. Winds help propel the boat forward but obstacles such as pirates, rocks, and stubborn anchors represent the risks that the team might encounter that could slow them down or even stop them from getting to where they need to be.

  • Boat : The Scrum team
  • Sails : The things that helped us move forward (Wind, Cloud)
  • Anchors : The things that held us back (Pirates, Rocks, Sharks, Icebergs, and Anchors)
  • Island : The goals to be achieved
  • Sun : What the team liked, the actions or attitudes that deserve thanks
  • Reef : Represent future obstacles that have been identified, which the group is likely to encounter in the subsequent iterations.

Note : The original Sailboat technique doesn’t have a Sun – I added it to give them a feeling of accomplishment as most teams should understand that there are already things that work just fine. And it’s definitely worth the time to help the team to build on this base.

  • Fact-based Analysis for Sprint Retrospective
  • Start, Stop, and Continue Sprint Retrospective
  • Glad-Sad-Mad Sprint Retrospective
  • Starfish Sprint Retrospective
  • Sailboat Sprint Retrospective
  • Liked Learned Lacked Longed For (4Ls) Retrospective

Different Steps of Sailboat Sprint Retrospective

Step 1: set the stage – draw a sailboat.

Start by setting clear expectations for the meeting, including the purpose, goals, and agenda. Make sure everyone is aware of the retrospective’s purpose and that it is a safe space for open and honest communication.

Let the team draw a picture of a sailboat floating in the water, and fill half the space above and half below the water with the sun, anchors, wind, rocks, reef, and an island or you can simply print pictures and just attach them to the board or any available wall space. This visual representation can help the team better understand their progress.

Note : Team drawing the boat helps to act as an icebreaker and get the group participating and on the boat.

Step 2: Name the Sailboat

Decide the topic/theme of the retrospective and name the boat accordingly.

Step 3: Add mission

Ask the team to write what their mission is, what they want to achieve, and what their goal is, and add these post-it notes to the hull of the boat. The team can amend or clarify or replace as the game continues.

The boat can be saved and revisited as part of sprint reviews, where sails and anchors can be reviewed, rescored, removed, and new sails and anchors added.

Tips : Ask team members to share their successes and challenges during the sprint or project. This allows everyone to see what worked well and what didn’t, which can help identify areas for improvement.

Step 4: Add Sails and Anchors

Ask the team to add sails and anchors to their boat. Sails represent things going well, what’s good, and what is putting the wind into their sails. Anchors are the things that could be going better, the anchors holding them back and limiting progress.

Step 5: Scale your sails and anchors

Ask the teams to scale their sales and anchors, their sails from +1 to + 10, is it a +1 or 2, a nice but relatively small in-value sail, or a main sail that’s providing huge momentum, a +9 or +10?  The anchors from -1, a minor impediment, or -10 this anchor have stopped us from moving forward at all.

Now team should brainstorm and discuss each note, seek to clarify the meaning of the note, and then decide as a group where on the scale it should be. Teams can vote by Dot Voting. The team can compare Sails and Anchors. Is it a bigger or smaller sail/anchor than the previous one? The key here is engaging in group discussions, awareness, and consensus on what the sail/anchor is and how it impacts the team. Sticky notes may need to be clarified with extra information or split into multiple notes to score separately.

Step 6: Add ideas for +1 raising sails and/or anchors

Once all sails and anchors have been discussed and scored ask the team to capture activities and improvements to help raise sails further and raise up anchors. Ask the team to think of small actions that would raise one of the sails, or anchors on the boat by just one point, raise an anchor from a -6 to a -5, or raise a sail from a 2 to a 3. Capture ideas for improvements on post-it notes and place them beside the relevant anchor or sail.

Step 7: Discuss Reef, and Sun and Plan the next steps

Remember to celebrate success and plan action items for current as well as future obstacles that have been identified during the above brainstorming.

If there are numerous suggestions for raising sails and anchors then team activities like estimation games, MoSCoW prioritization, and Dot Voting to help discuss, rank, and decide upon which improvements to take forward. Map the improvements/actions into the team backlog/future work or on a dedicated change and improvement board to help track and measure progress.

Sailboat Retrospective Example

Let’s take an example of a team that developed a mobile app during the sprint. The team was able to deliver the features on time but faced some challenges during the sprint. Here’s how they conducted the Sailboat Retrospective:

  • Draw a Sailboat: The team drew a sailboat with a sail, a mast, a keel, a waterline, wind, rocks, and a shore.
  • Write the Sprint Goal: The team wrote the sprint goal at the top of the sailboat: “Develop a mobile app with login, registration, and dashboard features.”
  • List the Positive Factors: The team listed the positive factors that helped them during the sprint, such as good communication, pair programming, and code reviews. They wrote these on the sail and the mast, as the wind filled the sail and propelled the sailboat forward.
  • List the Negative Factors: The team listed the negative factors that hindered their progress during the sprint, such as a lack of automated testing, dependency on external APIs, and unclear requirements. They wrote these on the keel and the rocks, as the obstacles that slowed down the sailboat or could cause it to crash.
  • Identify the Improvement Areas: The team discussed the negative factors and identified areas for improvement.

Open-ended Questions for Sailboat Retrospective

  • What makes them happy?
  • What’s slowing them down?
  • What’s propelling them forward? What are the gusts of wind that help our sailboat to move forward?
  • Is this bigger or smaller than the last item we scaled?
  • If you could cut away one anchor which would it be? How could you do that?
  • If you could raise one sail to 10 which would it be? How could you do that?
  • What would happen if all anchors were cut away?  what would change?
  • If you could add an ‘iron sail’ (an engine!) to your sailboat what would it be?
  • How can we raise this sail from a 5 to a 6?
  • How can we raise this anchor from a -7 to a -6?

Sailboat or Speedboat Facilitation Tips

  • First collect all the anchors, as it’s easier for most teams to organize their current problems.
  • Ask the team to turn each anchor into goals, desires, or wishes and put them before the cloud to represent the gusts of wind pushing the boat forward.
  • Use these “winds” to define a desirable goal you will use as a true north for the rest of the retrospective.
  • Use data to help guide the retrospective discussion, such as team velocity or user feedback. Data can help provide a more objective view of the team’s performance.
  • Based on the discussion, identify specific action items that the team can work on to improve. Make sure to assign ownership of these items and set clear deadlines.
  • Follow up on the action items from the retrospective in the next meeting to ensure progress is being made.
  • Keep the retrospective focused on finding solutions, not blaming individuals or criticizing past decisions. Maintain a positive and constructive atmosphere to encourage open communication and a sense of teamwork.

Sailboat or Speedboat Challenges & Strategies to Overcome

Sailboat Sprint Retrospectives are an important part of the Agile development process, as they allow teams to reflect on their progress and identify areas for improvement. However, there are several common challenges that teams may face during these retrospectives. Here are some of the most common challenges and tips on how to overcome them:

  • Lack of Participation: In some cases, team members may be hesitant to speak up during a retrospective, which can hinder the effectiveness of the session. To overcome this, the facilitator can encourage participation by creating a safe and open environment where all team members feel comfortable sharing their thoughts and ideas. They can also try using interactive activities or icebreakers to get everyone engaged.
  • Blaming and Finger-Pointing: Retrospectives can sometimes turn into a blame game, with team members pointing fingers at each other for mistakes or issues. This can lead to a negative atmosphere and prevent constructive feedback. To avoid this, the facilitator should set ground rules at the session’s beginning that encourage constructive criticism and discourage personal attacks.
  • Lack of Actionable Insights: In some cases, retrospectives can feel like a waste of time if the team does not develop actionable insights they can implement in future sprints. To prevent this, the facilitator can ensure that the team focuses on identifying specific actions that they can take to improve in the next sprint. They can also assign action items to team members and set deadlines for completion.
  • Dominant Voices: Sometimes, one or two team members may dominate the conversation during a retrospective, preventing others from sharing their thoughts and ideas. To prevent this, the facilitator can use round-robin or anonymous feedback to ensure that everyone has an equal opportunity to speak.
  • Lack of Follow-Through: Even if the team comes up with actionable insights during the retrospective, there is a risk that they may not be implemented in future sprints. To prevent this, the facilitator can assign ownership of action items to specific team members and follow up on their progress in subsequent retrospectives.

Scrum Master Role in Facilitating Sailboat Sprint Retrospective

The Scrum Master plays a critical role in facilitating a successful Sailboat Sprint Retrospective. Here are some key responsibilities of the Scrum Master in this process:

  • Creating a Safe and Open Environment: The Scrum Master needs to create a safe and open environment where team members feel comfortable sharing their thoughts and feedback. The Scrum Master should encourage open and honest communication, actively listen to the team members, and ensure that everyone has an opportunity to share their perspectives.
  • Guiding the Retrospective Process: The Scrum Master should guide the retrospective process, ensuring that it stays on track and that the team is making progress towards actionable improvements. The Scrum Master should use the Sailboat metaphor to help the team identify areas of strength and improvement, and facilitate a discussion that leads to actionable items.
  • Encouraging Collaborative Problem Solving: The Scrum Master should encourage the team to work collaboratively to solve problems and address issues identified during the retrospective. The Scrum Master should facilitate a discussion where the team can brainstorm potential solutions and identify concrete action items.
  • Facilitating Continuous Improvement: The Scrum Master should ensure that the team is focused on continuous improvement and that the actionable items identified during the retrospective are implemented. The Scrum Master should work with the team to develop a plan to implement the changes and monitor progress towards the goals identified.
  • Monitoring Team Dynamics: The Scrum Master should also monitor team dynamics during the retrospective to identify any issues that may be hindering team performance. The Scrum Master should work with the team to address these issues and promote a positive team culture.

Sprint Retrospective – Tools and Techniques: Click Here

The guide to retrospectives – remote, in person, or hybrid

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Master the sailboat retrospective in 4 steps

You want your agile retrospectives to be as valuable as possible, right? Of course you do. We have good news for you: the sailboat retrospective is an engaging way for your team to honestly evaluate your previous sprint and figure out the best way forward. Here’s everything you need to know about this helpful retrospective technique. 

What is the sailboat retrospective?

The sailboat retrospective is a retrospective technique where you and your agile team members will envision the last sprint as a sailboat. It’s a visual way for your team to identify what pushed the project forward, as well as what held it back. 

The 4 steps to a sailboat retrospective

This sailboat metaphor makes for an enlightening sprint retrospective. But how can you implement the sailboat technique on your own team? Start by opening a  sailboat retrospective template  on your Miro board. You'll see a sailboat image, a patch of land, a waterline, rocks, and an anchor below the boat. Here's one we love by Miro user Johanna Tortensson. Next, gather your team and equip them with some  digital sticky notes  in Miro to use during the retro. You can even add their names as tags to the stickies so they know which ones are designated for them. With everything in place, it’s time for your team to brainstorm their answers to the following questions with regard to your last sprint:

What risks did the sprint face?

What delayed the sprint?

What propelled the sprint forward?

Team members will jot their answers to those questions down on individual sticky notes and place them on the appropriate spot on your picture of a sailboat. Then, similar themes can be grouped together, and your team can discuss their findings and vote on what action items they’ll use to improve the next sprint. Make sense? Good. Now, let’s talk a little bit more about the individual elements of the sailboat exercise.  

1. Rocks (risks)

What happens if a boat hits a rock? It gets hung up and damaged. The same is true for your sprint. The rocks represent a potential risk or obstacle for your sprint. These can persist for a long time if your team doesn’t come up with a way to address them. 

2. Anchors (delaying issues)

An anchor keeps a boat in one spot, and that’s why they’re the perfect representation of the things that held your sprint back. What caused major bottlenecks or challenges? What inhibited your agile team from making as much progress as possible? 

3. Wind (helping teams)

Wind propels a sailboat forward, and that’s why it represents what went well with your previous sprint. You’ll identify what was quite literally putting wind in your sails. You might also hear this referred to as the helping team. 

4. Land (the goal)

Finally, the land is where your boat is headed. Using the sailboat metaphor it represents your goal or vision for the sprint. It can include both long and short-term objectives for the agile team. 

Why the sailboat is such a useful retrospective 

The sailboat is a popular retrospective format for a number of reasons. First of all, it’s a fun, visual way to reflect on your past sprint and capture ideas. The use of the sailboat metaphor makes it far more approachable and digestible. A team doesn’t need to be well-versed in agile concepts and terminology to understand how to make this technique work for them. Additionally, many retrospective techniques look mostly at what went well and what didn’t during a sprint. This format digs deeper and challenges teams to identify what is helping and hurting their project, timeline, and their collaboration. This leads to even more continuous improvement. 

Keeping collaboration and confidentiality high with sailboat retrospectives

With a sailboat retrospective, your team is bound to uncover a lot of valuable information – some of which might not be meant for everybody’s eyes. If you complete this sailboat exercise on a traditional whiteboard, you’ll need to remove all of your findings at the end of the retrospective meeting or store your board somewhere safe. And, even further, if some of your team members are remote, there’s no way for them to access that information if and when they need it.That’s why it’s better to use a virtual, collaborative whiteboard like  Miro . You can use all of your favorite retrospective games and techniques, and your team (no matter where they are!) will be able to actively participate and easily refer back to that information later.  Learn more about Miro's online whiteboard tool>>

3 FAQs about the sailboat retrospective

Ask any Scrum master, agile coach, product owner, or team leader, and they’ll be quick to tell you that the sailboat retrospective is a fun way for your team to evaluate your latest sprint. Have more questions about how it could work on your own agile team? We have your answers right here. 

1. Why is the sailboat retrospective so widely used?

Here’s our short answer: because it’s simple. The metaphor makes it highly engaging, and it also makes it incredibly straightforward. Everybody understands a sailboat, so teams can use this technique to generate ideas and brainstorm action items without a lot of training or technical expertise. 

2. Is a sailboat and speedboat retrospective the same?

They’re very similar in that they both use a metaphor as a good starting point for your sprint reviews. There are a number of different retrospective techniques that use a similar system and metaphor, like the sailboat, speedboat, and even the pirate ship. 

3. What do anchors represent in the sailboat retrospective? 

Anchors represent the things that held your sprint or project back. What kept it from moving forward as efficiently as possible? Perhaps you had a lot of siloed communication. Or maybe getting the right feedback and approvals was a bottleneck. Those delays are represented as anchors on your picture of a sailboat.

Ready to get started? Try this sailboat retrospective template for free when you sign up for Miro.

Michael de le Maza, Agile Coach Michael is an industry-recognized Agile & Scrum Coach and consultant who helps companies succeed by supporting company-wide agile transformations.

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Webinar | The Top Challenges Facing Modern Leaders 

Resilient leadership is about adaptability, open communication, and creating a positive culture. Leaders need to build strong relationships, set attainable goals, and foster collaboration within their teams. By embracing these insights & watching our leadership webinar, you can navigate uncertainty with greater confidence and resilience.

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Mastering Soft Skills for Effective Work: Your Path to Professional Excellence

Today’s economic markets are dynamic, and this means the workplace also needs to be. Fast problem solving, decision making and collaboration with colleagues and customers play an important role. To be successful, employees need to bring more than just technical expertise alone. The ability to effectively navigate complex interactions, communicate with clarity, and collaborate effectively with others is essential. These abilities, often referred to as soft skills are critical to boost collaboration and to develop workplaces that enable people to work effectively and with ease.

In this comprehensive guide, we will examine ten essential soft skills that can transform your professional journey more closely. Whether you’re an HR professional looking to enhance your company’s capabilities or an individual eager to boost your career, this article offers insights and actionable steps to work on your soft skills. 

agile 42 sailboat

How To Become A Scrum Master

Scrum has been proven to be a powerful framework for managing complex projects and delivering valuable products. As companies have become more Agile, the role of the Scrum Master has also become more important. If you’re intrigued by the idea of leading teams, fostering collaboration, and enabling seamless project delivery, becoming a Scrum Master could be the perfect path for you. In this complete guide, we’ll break down the steps on the path to becoming a Scrum Master and give you valuable insights to help you make an informed decision.

agile 42 sailboat

How to Become a Product Owner

Product Owners bridge the gap between customers, stakeholders, and the development team, playing a crucial role in delivering competitive products to market as quickly as possible. A good product that delights customers is the core of any successful business, so it’s no wonder that people who are in charge of developing good products are in high demand. This article will provide you with an overview of how to become a Product Owner, listing the skills, traits, certifications, and steps to take on this journey. 

agile42 enables leaders and their teams to create a resilient organization and a sustainable change process. We equip them with the tools they need daily to grow the business and foster the right organizational culture.

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  • Types of Sailboats
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  • Bavaria Match 42

The Bavaria Match 42 Sailboat Specs & Key Performance Indicators

The Bavaria Match 42, a light-displacement aft-cockpit sloop, was designed by Doug Peterson and built in Germany by Bavaria Yachts.

A Bavaria Match 42 sailboat prepares to weigh anchor

Published Specification for the Bavaria Match 42

Underwater Profile:  Bulb fin keel & spade rudder

Hull Material:  GRP (Fibreglass)

Length Overall:  41'2" (12.6m)

Waterline Length: 36 '1" (11.0m)

Beam:  12'3" (3.7m)

Draft:  7'1" (2.2m) *

Rig Type:  Fractional sloop

Displacement:  16,280lb (7,384kg)

Designer:  Doug Peterson

Builder:  Bavaria Yachts (Germany)

Year First Built:  2004

Year Last Built:  2006

*  A shallow draft version is available with a draft of 6'1" (1.85m).

Published Design Ratios for the Bavaria Match 42

1. Sail Area/Displacement Ratio:  30.7

2. Ballast/Displacement Ratio:  34.5

3. Displacement/Length Ratio:  155

4. Comfort Ratio:  23.8

5. Capsize Screening Formula:   1.9

read more about these Key Performance Indicators...

Summary Analysis of the Design Ratios for the Bavaria Match 42

eBook: How to Avoid Buying the Wrong Sailboat

1. A Sail Area/Displacement Ratio of 30.7 suggests that, in the right hands, the Bavaria Match 42 will have enough performance to leave most other sailboats of similar waterline length well astern. 

2. A Ballast/Displacement Ratio of 34.5 would usually mean that the Bavaria Match 42 would have a tendency to heel uncomfortably in a gust, and need to be reefed early to keep her sailing upright in a moderate breeze.

However, as she has much of her ballast concentrated in a bulb at the foot of her fin keel, she's likely to be considerably stiffer than her published Ballast/Displacement Ratio might suggest.

3. A Displacement/Length Ratio of 155, tells us the Bavaria Match 42 is clearly a light displacement sailboat. If she's loaded with too much heavy cruising gear her performance will suffer to a degree.

4. Ted Brewer's Comfort Ratio of 23.8 suggests that crew comfort of a Bavaria Match 42 in a seaway is similar to what you would associate with the motion of a coastal cruiser with moderate stability, which is not encouraging news for anyone prone to seasickness. 

5. The Capsize Screening Formula (CSF) of 1.9 indicates that a Bavaria Match 42 would be a safer choice of sailboat for an ocean passage than one with a CSF of more than 2.0. 

More about the Bavaria 42 Match...

The Bavaria Match 42 is a fast and agile sailboat designed by Doug Peterson and J&J Design and built by Bavaria Yachts between 2004 and 2006. It is a light-displacement fractional sloop that combines performance, comfort and style.

Bavaria Match 42 accommodation plan

Accommodation

The Bavaria Match 42 has a bright and cozy interior that offers ample living space and storage. It has a three-cabin layout that includes:

  • A forward cabin with a double berth, a hanging locker, shelves and an opening hatch;
  • Two aft cabins with double berths, hanging lockers, shelves and opening portlights;
  • A head compartment with a marine toilet, a sink, a shower, cabinets and an opening portlight at the foot of the companionway on the starboard side.

The Bavaria Match 42 also has a functional and stylish saloon that features:

  • A U-shaped dinette with a folding table on the starboard side that can seat up to six people;
  • A navigation station on the starboard side aft of the settee that has a chart table, an instrument panel, a seat and drawers;
  • A galley on the starboard side aft of the dinette that has a two-burner stove, an oven, a sink, a refrigerator, cabinets and countertops.

The Bavaria Match 42 has an attractive and modern design that features mahogany woodwork, white upholstery, blue curtains and cushions, stainless steel fittings and halogen lights.

Hull and Deck The Bavaria Match 42 has a strong and durable hull and deck that are made of fiberglass reinforced plastic (GRP) with sandwich construction. 

The Bavaria Match 42 has a high-quality finish that includes:

  • A white gelcoat on the hull and deck with blue stripes;
  • A non-slip surface on the deck;
  • A teak veneer on the cockpit seats, floor and swim platform;
  • An aluminum toe rail on the deck edge;
  • A stainless steel bow pulpit, stern pushpit, stanchions, lifelines, cleats, handrails, winches, fairleads and chainplates.

The Bavaria Match 42 has an efficient and versatile sail plan that includes:

  • A mainsail with two reefs, full battens and lazy jacks;
  • A furling genoa with UV protection;
  • A spinnaker with pole and gear;
  • An adjustable backstay
  • A rigid boom vang;
  • A roller furling system on the forestay;
  • A traveler on the coachroof;
  • Four self-tailing winches on the cockpit coaming;
  • Eight rope clutches on the cabin top.

The Bavaria Match 42 has a reliable and powerful engine that provides:

  • A Volvo Penta D2-55 diesel engine with 55 hp and saildrive;
  • A folding propeller;
  • A 150 L (40 gal) fuel tank;
  • A 300 L (79 gal) water tank;
  • A 40 L (11 gal) holding tank;
  • A 12 V electrical system with a battery charger, a shore power connection and an inverter;
  • A hot water system with a calorifier and an immersion heater;
  • A bilge pump, a fire extinguisher, a gas detector and a horn.

Other sailboats in the Bavaria product range include:

A Bavaria 44 sailboat at anchor

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The All-New Aquila 42 Yacht Power Catamaran is Here

CLEARWATER, FL (February 10, 2023) – The all-new Aquila 42 Yacht Power Catamaran  is here to redefine what it means to have fun on the water.

Jean Raas, Managing Director of Sino Eagle USA, comments, “The all-new Aquila 42 Yacht ticks off all boxes Aquila and our designers VPLP Design were looking to achieve on a smaller model.  The aft cockpit area provides you with an exceptional entertainment area with best-in-class water and dock access. Our expansive flybridge provides you with plenty of seating for everyone to take in the view while underway or when sitting at your favorite anchorage spot. The interior amenities have endless storage options while at the same time providing you with spectacular views when you are in your cabin or when sitting at the salon table. It is a true offshore cruising yacht that has been built to the strictest CE Category A regulations while at the same time providing you with exceptional performance in all conditions.”  The Aquila 42 Yacht offers two spacious staterooms with multiple configurations, a utility cabin, engine options from Volvo Penta, loads of storage, and comfortable spaces in the cockpit, flybridge, and foredeck. Whether you plan on long-distance cruising or entertaining at your favorite local destination, the 42 Yacht has you covered. The boat’s vinylester resin-infused hulls mean she is strong and light, while three sizable outdoor entertainment spaces leave plenty of room for guests. The 42 Yacht was designed by world-renowned power catamaran design firm VPLP Design.  Lex Raas, President of Aquila Power Catamarans, comments, “Our International Aquila team worked with the famous French VPLP designers to bring this amazing power catamaran to the market, using CFD (Computer Fluid Dynamics) and FEA (Finite Element Analysis) to enhance the performance and comfort at sea. As well as partnering with European Chendal Anglay for a modern interior design. Incorporating our Aquila Yachts DNA of bulbs, walkway from the flybridge, opening aft bar, patented dinghy crane, patented swim ladder, largest panoramic cabin windows in class, and our standard CE Category A certification  all culminating in a 42 ft power catamaran unrivaled in the world.” Alain Raas, Brand Manager, comments, “Dedicated design teams at VPLP Design and Sino Eagle Group have launched the all-new Aquila 42 Yacht.  The amazing configurations available from a 2+ cabin base boat up to a 4-cabin version are sure to accommodate the robust needs of our clients searching for a layout that meets their requirements for their boating style whether it be private ownership or charter ownership.  The stance and fluidity of the design have resulted in a boat that consists of sporty, clean & timeless lines.  Underneath the water her hull design results in a great running boat that is extremely efficient.  We are pleased to introduce the Aquila 42 Yacht to the world as we believe she will provide an amazing option for new boaters in the Yacht class range or those looking to downsize to a smaller functional boat that meets their boating needs.  Be sure to learn more about the all-new Aquila 42 Yacht at any of our MarineMax stores in the USA or any of our international dealers throughout the world.” There will be no competition for a boat that is so incredibly versatile and thoughtfully designed. Tune into our digital launch for a full walk-through of the 42 Yacht and much more. You can also stop by the Miami International Boat Show  to see this beauty make her global premiere, February 15 – 19. Learn more about the Aquila 42 Yacht .

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Discover the Aquila for You

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Find Your Aquila Dealer

You can read more about the Sailboat technique from Luke Hohmann's book Innovation Games. Luke also provides a free online tool to do these with distributed teams at www.innovationgames.com (choose Visual Collaboration Games).

Length of time:

Usually about 45 minutes to get through data gathering and insight generation.

Short Description:

This retrospective technique uses a sailboat as a metaphor for the team. The team identifies anchors (impediments) and wind (positive forces) and chooses an area to improve.

Either a large white board or a large piece of poster paper. Flip charts can be used, but in my experience are not quite big enough for most teams. They'll work in a pinch. Lots of sticky notes Thick markers

Preparation

Not much required, other than having the materials in place. You may wish to pre-draw the sailboat.

Introduction

The facilitator draws a large picture of a sailboat floating in the water, with about half of the space above and half below the water/boat. He/she then explains that we're going to use the sailboat as a visual metaphor for the team. On a sailboat, there are things that slow it down (anchors), and things that propel it forward (wind). Just like the sailboat, there are things that slow our team down, and things that propel it forward. The facilitator then asks the team to think of what is anchoring the team down and what is propelling it forward, and to start writing one anchor/wind per sticky note.

Gathering Data

Sometimes people will be unsure if they should gather a bunch of stickies and then come up, or just bring them up as soon as they have one. I encourage the latter. As a facilitator, just keep an eye out for the energy in the room - you may need to prompt someone to go ahead and put their items on the board. When the energy starts to die down a bit, give people a fair warning that we'll wrap this part up in a moment. Once you see that everyone is done, get ready for the next step.

Generating Insights

Ask the team to come up to the board and group sticky notes that seem related somehow. As they do it, ask them to read the sticky notes out loud. This part is a bit of a self-organizing activity, it may need a bit of facilitation to make sure that people are getting some value out of the grouping and that one person's opinion isn't dominating when creating the groups. Once the stickies are grouped, ask someone to label the groups. Typically this will result in one or a few large groups of sticky notes, which point out that there maybe a good amount of energy around addressing those items. You may ask someone to read all of the stickies at this point too, just to ensure nothing was overlooked.

Choosing what to do

Finally, you can ask team members to "dot vote" for the group or individual sticky they think should be worked on. I typically give everyone three votes, and they are allowed to use them however they please: place all votes on one sticky/group, distribute them around, or even don't use one. You can do this with drafting dots are simply everyone gets a marker and is on their honor to only place three dots. Total up the sticky/group with the most dots, and move into some root cause analysis and proposed changes to make!

The idea started from Luke Hohmann, and over the years has been modified a few times by many in the community.

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Sailboating: How This Agile Activity Can Help You Spark Innovation

UI/UX Design

An illustration of a sailboat surrounded by written notes and sketched wireframes

Working Agile

When developing a digital product, the classic process involved documenting requirements, designing solutions, and building and testing in a waterfall approach. Then Agile came around and changed everything, decreasing the time it took to deliver working software and reducing the need for front-loaded documentation.

By working in ‘sprints’, development teams can focus on core requirements to build a product, while allowing for the ups and downs that come with developing complex technology. An added bonus is that clients can deliver feedback after sprints rather than at the end of the ‘completed’ project.

Agile is a system of working, but it’s also a mindset based on promoting better interaction between the people involved in the project, the flexibility to change things when required, and focusing on working, functional product over bureaucracy. It’s a flexible way of working - hence the name ‘agile’, but it also encourages the concept of taking stock after a sprint to see what worked and what didn’t.

This is often called an Agile retrospective. These are exercises performed after a sprint or project to determine efficiency and spot problems or issues so a team can avoid them in the future. It also ties into a Lean methodology in that a retrospective helps cut future waste.

One of the most powerful forms of retrospectives comes in the form of the ‘sailboat exercise’.

What is the Agile Sailboat?

If you’re planning to work in an Agile system, or working with an agency that utilises Agile methodology (hint hint, it’s us), then you’ll probably encounter the term sailboating.

Even if you’re NOT an agile organisation, the sailboating exercise can still be a great way to help rethink your projects and prioritise the production journey. It’s a visual metaphor and an exercise that focuses on the team and future direction.

A sailboat workshop involves two main processes: the team writing down answers to a few questions and then mapping these answers against the ‘sailboat’ metaphor.

You can use a digital board such as Miro for this, or Sticky notes will do the trick if you’re doing it in person. Ask your team the following questions (adjusting based on whether you’re running this as a sprint exercise or at an operational level.)

At operational level:

What’s moving us forward?

What are our goals?

What’s holding us back?

What’s not gone so well?

For sprint exercises:

What risks did the sprint/project face?

What delayed the sprint?

What propelled the sprint forward?

agile 42 sailboat

The Sailboat in action at a KOMODO Innovation Workshop.

Once your team have created their answers as Sticky Notes, ask them to stick them to a graphic you’ve drawn or printed that includes the following elements:

A boat - this is your team/project.

An island - this is the goal you’re working towards. It can be the specific features designed in a sprint or a more operational-level goal.

Wind in your sails : what propels your team/project forward.

Rocks : the risks your project faces in the future as it reaches the goal.

Anchor : the problems and challenges which delayed the sprint/project.

Once the team has had a chance to place their sticky notes, go through as a group and see if you agree on the placements. Then see if there’s a common theme being suggested by multiple people as a delay.

Just like you would in an Agile sprint, you can use this information to pivot and enact change. For example, if there’s an anchor problem holding your team back, prioritise a way to remove it. Outlining the ‘rock’ or future risk also helps you spot potential obstacles that should be dealt with before they become a problem and ‘sink’ the ship.

The sailboat exercise is great because it’s a visual metaphor that is easy to understand. It aligns the team and quite literally puts everyone in the same boat. For an agency/client relationship, sailboating also helps both sides of the relationship feel they are aligned and heading in the right direction.

While the Sailboat method is so often used in a retrospective fashion, we believe it has great value as an onboarding process for new projects and why it features as the first activity in our innovation workshop process.

Sailboat as a prospective tool

The sailboat system can also be used at the beginning of a project to help map out your strengths and weaknesses.

Demand for your product.

What your user’s needs are.

What solutions are most important in terms of priority.

We’ve written about this sort of thinking many times - but it’s so important we thought we’d mention it again here in the context of the Sailboat exercise. You can’t, for example, just go into a planning session with ‘general ideas’ of what your customers want. Instead, you need to do research and ensure that your product can solve a genuine need . Otherwise, it’s all based on guesswork.

agile 42 sailboat

Once you know enough about your users, you can use Sailboat to plan the overall product or project. This time, you’d define the elements as:

Rocks : what risks does the product face in terms of competitors, technical issues, user error?

Island : what functional requirements are most important - they should be positioned closer to the ‘shore’ to create priorities.

Anchor : what issues could delay the project. Think of factors like stakeholder intervention, poor client/agency communication etc.

Wind/sail: what can contribute towards the product being completed to the right timeframe?

While you might not have the same retrospective analysis to assign actual, tangible things that went wrong for your rocks etc. The sailboat is still a good way to map out a project at the beginning to get your team on the same page.

Remember that the sailboat as a concept is not really that important. It could be many different visual metaphors - all of them just have to share a way to map goals, threats and success factors.

By completing these exercises either at the start of a project or as a retroactive after a sprint as intended, you’ll be putting your team on the right track and creating a more collaborative process both internally and, if working with an agency, externally too.

The sailboat is just one Agile exercise we love. If you choose to work with KOMODO for your digital product development, we’ll lend our workshopping expertise to your project journey to help ensure the product is as functional and successful as it can be. Get in touch if you’d like to know more .

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IMAGES

  1. Agile 42 carbon sailing yacht test-sail

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  2. Agile 42 Karma

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  3. Electric Agile 42 Sailing Yacht by VMG Yachtbuilder

    agile 42 sailboat

  4. Agile 42 „Karma”: Fahrtenyacht aus Carbon

    agile 42 sailboat

  5. Agile 42 Karma

    agile 42 sailboat

  6. Agile 42 Karma

    agile 42 sailboat

VIDEO

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COMMENTS

  1. Agile Yachts

    Agile Yachts® is our semi-custom line of full carbon high performance cruisers built in 42, 62 and 82 feet. In short: a thoroughbred racing machine with sufficient and stylish comfort for cruising with family and friends, totally customized. An Agile Yacht is characterized by its ultra modern design based on the latest insights in naval architecture.

  2. Electric Agile 42 Sailing Yacht by VMG Yachtbuilder

    Built by VMG Yachtbuilders and launched in September 2017 the Agile 42 (Karma) has been designed for discerning yachties who want to combine speed and comfort. The Agile 42 is built entirely of carbon fibre to create a lightweight yacht. However this yacht is equipped with a full on interior with enough space and all the necessities as well as ...

  3. Agile 42

    A full carbon high performance cruiser In short the Agile Yacht 42 is a thoroughbred racing machine with sufficient and stylish comfort for cruising with family and friends, totally customized. The yacht is characterized by its ultra modern design based on the latest insights in naval architecture. All designs are SimonisVoogd's. Agile Yachts® are hand-built […]

  4. Interesting Sailboats: AGILE 42: A DREAM BOAT

    AGILE 42: A DREAM BOAT Some years ago, when I saw the drawings of this boat, designed by Maarten Voogd and proposed by a Dutch shipyard, one specialized on old school classic sailingboats, I thought: Wow! Beautiful…but one of those boats that are never going to reach the water.

  5. Agile 42 Exterior

    Agile 42 Exterior. Designed by SimonisVoogd Design, Agile Yachts are highly recognizable from a distance by their distinctive negative bow and hull shape. The retractable bowsprit of 3 meters allows the deployment of a large genaker (180m²). The extremely clean deck and huge cockpit offer the crew a lot of space and freedom of movement.

  6. Agile 42 Karma

    LOA: 12.55m. Manufacturer: Agile Yachts. Designed by: Simonis Voogd Design. Built: 2017. Built by VMG Yachtbuilders and launched in September 2017 the Agile 42 (Karma) has been designed for discerning yachties who want to combine speed and comfort. The Agile 42 is built entirely of carbon fibre to create a lightweight yacht.

  7. Agile 42

    Agile 42. Already a few weeks ago we had a test sail together with the owner of the Agile, the designer (Simonis Voogd design) and some of the suppliers and builders of the yacht. It was blowing around 20kts and that was also the speed we reached downwind. The Agile42 shows that you can really have a full interior yacht (HPLC High Performance ...

  8. Agile 42

    The hull shape for the Agile 42 is an evolution of that work - full-size tanktesting, you might call it. "It is a low resistance hull shape with a very flat run aft, but minimal wetted surface," adds Voogd. "This makes the boat very slippery in all conditions.

  9. Hybrid agility

    The goal with the Dutch-built Agile 42 was to identify and then deliver a very different type of offer in terms of high performance and quality… A designer's dream and a builder's vision seem to have recently coalesced rather nicely to create the Agile 42, a brand new high-performance, all-carbon luxury cruiser from the Netherlands.

  10. Agile 42 carbon sailing yacht test-sail

    Test sailing with the Agile 42 with English Braids ropes, VMG yachtbuilders and Tuned rigs and More Marine.Used ropes: DM20 dynastay, Technora covers, Dyneem...

  11. Agile 42 Featured in Yachting World

    Agile yachts is featured in #YachtingWorld this month in the 'new boat' section. Next to that we can now announce that there will be a full article about the Agile 42 in the next Seahorse magazine. So everybody run to the store and get the April edition of Seahorse magazine!

  12. Agile 42 sailing: 2 boats, 1 wind.... #agileyachts

    1.3K views, 34 likes, 3 loves, 2 comments, 10 shares, Facebook Watch Videos from VMG Yachtbuilders: Agile 42 sailing: 2 boats, 1 wind.... #agileyachts

  13. agile42

    Transform your Organization Through. Leadership. , Culture. and. Resilience. agile42 enables leaders and their teams to create a resilient organization and a sustainable process of change. We equip you with the tools you'll need every day to successfully grow your business, embrace agile frameworks, and foster a great organizational culture.

  14. Agile 42 "Karma": Carbon cruising yacht

    A cruising yacht made entirely of carbon, super-fast and cosy to boot. The "Karma" is being built in Enkhuizen on the Ijsselmeer in a collaborative effort.

  15. About us

    agile42, founded in Berlin in 2007, provides world-class expertise, training and coaching on Lean-Agile development methods including Scrum, Kanban, Systems thinking and Lean and Agile Leadership. We have a proven approach for managing the adoption of Lean-Agile methods and transforming organizations to achieve better business outcomes.

  16. Agile 42: Coal Instead Of Cheese

    Agile 42. The hull under construction. Smooth surfaces thanks to vacuum injection. 46 percent ballast means a keel weight of 2.2 tons at a depth of 2.40 meters. Coupled with around 100 upwind square meters, which corresponds to a sail load rating of 5.9, power is therefore not an issue. The name Simonis / Voogd also ensures this - the office is ...

  17. Run The SailBoat Agile Exercise or Sailboat Retrospective

    Run The SailBoat Agile Exercise or Sailboat Retrospective. Luis Gonçalves Mar 17, 2023 5:26:45 PM. In this post, I will explain the method known as SailBoat Exercise or Sailboat Retrospective. This exercise can be found in the book Getting Value out of Agile Retrospectives. A book that was written by me and Ben Linders with a foreword by ...

  18. Sailboat or Speedboat

    Step 1: Set the Stage - Draw a Sailboat. Start by setting clear expectations for the meeting, including the purpose, goals, and agenda. Make sure everyone is aware of the retrospective's purpose and that it is a safe space for open and honest communication. Let the team draw a picture of a sailboat floating in the water, and fill half the ...

  19. Sailboat Retrospective: How to Make One in 4 Steps

    Start by opening a sailboat retrospective template on your Miro board. You'll see a sailboat image, a patch of land, a waterline, rocks, and an anchor below the boat. Here's one we love by Miro user Johanna Tortensson. Next, gather your team and equip them with some digital sticky notes in Miro to use during the retro.

  20. Blog

    September 19, 2023 / by agile42. Resilient leadership is about adaptability, open communication, and creating a positive culture. Leaders need to build strong relationships, set attainable goals, and foster collaboration within their teams. By embracing these insights & watching our leadership webinar, you can navigate uncertainty with greater ...

  21. The Bavaria Match 42 Sailboat

    The Bavaria Match 42 is a fast and agile sailboat designed by Doug Peterson and J&J Design and built by Bavaria Yachts between 2004 and 2006. It is a light-displacement fractional sloop that combines performance, comfort and style. Accommodation plan.

  22. The All-New Aquila 42 Yacht Power Catamaran is Here

    CLEARWATER, FL (February 10, 2023) - The all-new Aquila 42 Yacht Power Catamaran is here to redefine what it means to have fun on the water. Jean Raas, Managing Director of Sino Eagle USA, comments, "The all-new Aquila 42 Yacht ticks off all boxes Aquila and our designers VPLP Design were looking to achieve on a smaller model.

  23. Sailboat

    Introduction. The facilitator draws a large picture of a sailboat floating in the water, with about half of the space above and half below the water/boat. He/she then explains that we're going to use the sailboat as a visual metaphor for the team. On a sailboat, there are things that slow it down (anchors), and things that propel it forward (wind).

  24. Sailboating: How This Agile Activity Can Help You Spark Innovation

    A sailboat workshop involves two main processes: the team writing down answers to a few questions and then mapping these answers against the 'sailboat' metaphor'. You can use a digital board such as Miro for this, or Sticky notes will do the trick if you're doing it in person. Ask your team the following questions (adjusting based on whether you're running this as a sprint exercise ...